#1
Up until this point, I've been playing with random settings on Garageband (10.1.4) connected to my guitar via an iRig2
Hadn't realized it until this point, my tone sounds really scratchy maybe sometimes "squeaky" on the higher pitched strings.. I tried putting a "chorus" pedal to it, didn't seem to help.

What I'm trying to get is a tone like Within Temptation's guitars. (Like from "Sinéad" and "Shot in the dark")
I'm not trying to get the exact tone, but I want something similar or something distorted (but not 100% clean) yet not so crunchy or scratchy
And no, I'm too poor to spend money for new pickups (I'm still using the stock LH150 pickups on my MH50).

Thanks
Gear:
- ESP LTD MH-50
- Strandberg OS 7
- A cheap fender strat knock-off not worth naming
- Garageband
- Boss GT-1
- Potato
#2
Describing tone is difficult because when you say "scratchy" you don't necessarily mean the same thing that I think of when I hear "scratchy". Uploading a short clip would help.

A pickup upgrade isn't going to make a difference if you are playing solely through Garageband.

Also chorus pedals aren't really designed for that. A chorus effect will basically duplicate the signal, knock it out of tune slightly and then play both signals back together. That isn't going to affect the "scratchiness".
#3
Quote by Random3
Describing tone is difficult because when you say "scratchy" you don't necessarily mean the same thing that I think of when I hear "scratchy".


Yep.

Parac also, just an extra note here. As a guitarist AND a recording artist you are subject to a whole lot of destructive subjectivity based on your feel for guitar playing. I always recommend that guitarists who are stuggling with the sound of their guitars on a recording to complete a recorded mix before deciding on guitar tone. Mixing your guitars against a band and trying to stay pragmatic will inevitably lead to different recording choices.
#4
Quote by Parac
Up until this point, I've been playing with random settings on Garageband (10.1.4) connected to my guitar via an iRig2
Hadn't realized it until this point, my tone sounds really scratchy maybe sometimes "squeaky" on the higher pitched strings.. I tried putting a "chorus" pedal to it, didn't seem to help.

What I'm trying to get is a tone like Within Temptation's guitars. (Like from "Sinéad" and "Shot in the dark")
I'm not trying to get the exact tone, but I want something similar or something distorted (but not 100% clean) yet not so crunchy or scratchy
And no, I'm too poor to spend money for new pickups (I'm still using the stock LH150 pickups on my MH50).

Thanks
Presuming you are just talking about the harmonics that are created with distortion, there is no real way to get around it. I typically try to use tones that are cleaner than I think I need to help in that regard. You may also just be growing out of your software. Pickups will not really help. Pickup SELECTION may help though. Try neck and middle settings if you have not yet.

Now as I said with typical guitar distortion you will get harmonics caused by the compression, which can cause the aggressive, scratchy sound. And when the guitar is by itself, isolated outside of a mix, it is usually pretty apparent. But typically modern mixes will EQ the guitar to be primarily a midrange instrument. That means the high harmonics are not as apparent, and underneath cymbals and other high-frequency sources, you do not notice them.
#5
GB actually has some pretty good amp sims that can be widely tuned to taste. I must first assume that you understand gain levels and you are not ever driving your guitar input into the red zone. Check your input levels first. About a dozen possible reasons for "scratchy" tone so you are going to have to be more specific or post some samples.

Here is a collaborative work in progress with a few friends around the country. All the guitar tracks are Strat > interface > stock GB amp sims.
https://soundcloud.com/dave-hockett/rgmix
"Your sound is in your hands as much as anything. It's the way you pick, and the way you hold the guitar, more than it is the amp or the guitar you use." -- Stevie Ray Vaughan

"Anybody can play. The note is only 20 percent. The attitude of the motherfucker who plays it is 80 percent." -- Miles Davis

Guthrie on tone: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zmohdG9lLqY
Last edited by Cajundaddy at Dec 12, 2016,
#6
Quote by Cajundaddy
GB actually has some pretty good amp sims that can be widely tuned to taste. I must first assume that you understand gain levels and you are not ever driving your guitar input into the red zone. Check your input levels first. About a dozen possible reasons for "scratchy" tone so you are going to have to be more specific or post some samples.

Here is a collaborative work in progress with a few friends around the country. All the guitar tracks are Strat > interface > stock GB amp sims.
https://soundcloud.com/dave-hockett/rgmix


GB has so many amps true, but whats all these "Model", "amp", "Cabinet", "Mic"
what is all that supposed to mean? Up until now, I've used just the "brown tweed stack" or something like that..
Gear:
- ESP LTD MH-50
- Strandberg OS 7
- A cheap fender strat knock-off not worth naming
- Garageband
- Boss GT-1
- Potato
#7
Quote by Parac
GB has so many amps true, but whats all these "Model", "amp", "Cabinet", "Mic"
what is all that supposed to mean? Up until now, I've used just the "brown tweed stack" or something like that..


Just get all connected and start tweaking the amp sims to taste and you can hear the changes in real time. Once you have a sound you like, hit the rec button.
"Your sound is in your hands as much as anything. It's the way you pick, and the way you hold the guitar, more than it is the amp or the guitar you use." -- Stevie Ray Vaughan

"Anybody can play. The note is only 20 percent. The attitude of the motherfucker who plays it is 80 percent." -- Miles Davis

Guthrie on tone: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zmohdG9lLqY
#8
Quote by Parac
GB has so many amps true, but whats all these "Model", "amp", "Cabinet", "Mic"
what is all that supposed to mean? Up until now, I've used just the "brown tweed stack" or something like that..
Without looking at the software, I don't know why they broke up "Model" and "Amp", I would think they would do the same thing- choose which amp you are emulating. Cabinet should be a speaker/cabinet sim, which is REALLY important as guitar speaker frequency responses do A LOT for the sound. If you have not been using cabinet simulations I can see where you would get a scratchy sound. Mic should emulate as if you are recording the amp with a mic on the speaker cabinet.
Last edited by Will Lane at Dec 13, 2016,
#9
Quote by Will Lane
Without looking at the software, I don't know why they broke up "Model" and "Amp", I would think they would do the same thing- choose which amp you are emulating. Cabinet should be a speaker/cabinet sim, which is REALLY important as guitar speaker frequency responses do A LOT for the sound. If you have not been using cabinet simulations I can see where you would get a scratchy sound. Mic should emulate as if you are recording the amp with a mic on the speaker cabinet.


This is just what i somehow got to, I remember messing around with a few things, but this is what it looks like currently
Gear:
- ESP LTD MH-50
- Strandberg OS 7
- A cheap fender strat knock-off not worth naming
- Garageband
- Boss GT-1
- Potato
#10
Quote by Will Lane
Without looking at the software, I don't know why they broke up "Model" and "Amp", I would think they would do the same thing- choose which amp you are emulating. Cabinet should be a speaker/cabinet sim, which is REALLY important as guitar speaker frequency responses do A LOT for the sound. If you have not been using cabinet simulations I can see where you would get a scratchy sound. Mic should emulate as if you are recording the amp with a mic on the speaker cabinet.


I can't seem to upload a screenshot.. so here's the text version:

Model: brown stack
Amp: Brown head
Cabinet: Brown 4x12
Mic: Condenser 87
Gain: 8
Bass: 6.5
Mid: 8
Treble: 6
Reverb (off)
Depth (off)
Sync/Free: free
Speed: 6
Trem/Vib: trem
Presence: 5
Master: 7

Not sure what most of that is, but that's what came with the track
Gear:
- ESP LTD MH-50
- Strandberg OS 7
- A cheap fender strat knock-off not worth naming
- Garageband
- Boss GT-1
- Potato
#11
Quote by Parac
I can't seem to upload a screenshot.. so here's the text version:

Model: brown stack
Amp: Brown head
Cabinet: Brown 4x12
Mic: Condenser 87
Gain: 8
Bass: 6.5
Mid: 8
Treble: 6
Reverb (off)
Depth (off)
Sync/Free: free
Speed: 6
Trem/Vib: trem
Presence: 5
Master: 7

Not sure what most of that is, but that's what came with the track
I guess by "Model" it is a preset for the sound. The amp is, well the amp, the cabinet is the speaker set and orientation. What it means by "brown" is it is emulating a Brownface Fender amp, and the speakers that normally came with them. The mic selection will allow you to choose various mic models as if you were micing the amp's speaker, which mics have a frequency response and sound of their own.

Gain is how much "distortion" is applied to the signal. Bass is "thump", midrange is the "meat" of the guitar signal, treble is the brightness. Reverb simulates if you were listening to the amp in a large room with a lot of reverberation. Depth presumably matches with the Trem/Vib, which will vary how apparent the effect is. Dunno what Sync/Free is. Speed is how fast the Trem/Vib will modulacte. Presence adjusts the amps really high frequencies. Master is the overall volume of the amp. Play around with settings and see what they do.
#12
Quote by Will Lane
I guess by "Model" it is a preset for the sound. The amp is, well the amp, the cabinet is the speaker set and orientation. What it means by "brown" is it is emulating a Brownface Fender amp, and the speakers that normally came with them. The mic selection will allow you to choose various mic models as if you were micing the amp's speaker, which mics have a frequency response and sound of their own.

Gain is how much "distortion" is applied to the signal. Bass is "thump", midrange is the "meat" of the guitar signal, treble is the brightness. Reverb simulates if you were listening to the amp in a large room with a lot of reverberation. Depth presumably matches with the Trem/Vib, which will vary how apparent the effect is. Dunno what Sync/Free is. Speed is how fast the Trem/Vib will modulacte. Presence adjusts the amps really high frequencies. Master is the overall volume of the amp. Play around with settings and see what they do.


I'll mess around more with the settings now that I have a better understanding and see what I can do with it
Thanks very much for explaining it
Gear:
- ESP LTD MH-50
- Strandberg OS 7
- A cheap fender strat knock-off not worth naming
- Garageband
- Boss GT-1
- Potato
#13
Quote by Will Lane
. Dunno what Sync/Free is


Educated guess would be for Trem to synch it to tempo based on note value, or determine rate based on MS or 1-10 value.

Big cause of 'scratchy' guitars (especially working with modelers) is too much gain. Digital gain is scratchy to begin with, and having too much acerbates the issue. One of the tricks behind a good heavy distorted sound is less gain, more subtle amp EQ, and optimal picking style. Once you have that down, mixing plays a big part in the guitar sound you hear in a recording. Guitars can sound weak and piddly on their own, but massive in a mix, and vise versa.
Quote by Watterboy
Do you have any dilithium crystals or fresh warm dumps for sale
Last edited by the chemist at Dec 15, 2016,