#1
Is there any reason to change strings if they are not broken? If so how and when do you know when to do it
#2
if they start to feel a bit rusty, scratchy or just not as nice under your fingers. they might not stay in tune as well either.
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Quote by K33nbl4d3
I'll have to put the Classic T models on my to-try list. Shame the finish options there are Anachronism Gold, Nuclear Waste and Aged Clown, because in principle the plaintop is right up my alley.

Quote by K33nbl4d3
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Quote by T00DEEPBLUE
Et tu, br00tz?
#3
Quote by drmgchiro
Is there any reason to change strings if they are not broken? If so how and when do you know when to do it
Yes, after a period of time they will loose their luster due to oxidation, hand sweat, etc. They may also start to have trouble holding their pitch. However, defining the period of time is dependent upon the person. I change the strings on my main use guitar every month and a half.
#4
i do it as rarely as i can get away with
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Quote by K33nbl4d3
I'll have to put the Classic T models on my to-try list. Shame the finish options there are Anachronism Gold, Nuclear Waste and Aged Clown, because in principle the plaintop is right up my alley.

Quote by K33nbl4d3
Presumably because the CCF (Combined Corksniffing Forces) of MLP and Gibson forums would rise up against them, plunging the land into war.

Quote by T00DEEPBLUE
Et tu, br00tz?
#5
I change acoustic strings when I get really tired of their dull sound or they break. I change electric strings when they go rusty or break. If acoustic or electric strings break at the tuner post, I often repair them by tying on an extension. I've been asked about this at gigs, and have claimed it is essential for the authentic blues tone.
#6
As soon as the intonation drifts a bit I change them
Gilchrist custom
Yamaha SBG500
Telecasters
Randall RM100 & RM20
Marshall JTM45 clone
Marshall JCM900 4102 (modded)
Marshall 18W clone
Fender 5F1 Champ clone
Atomic Amplifire
Marshall 1960A
Boss GT-100


Cathbard Amplification
My band
#7
Really depends on the person and what they want. Some people really like the sound of new strings (very crisp and bright sounding) so they change them very frequently - a couple of weeks to a month. Other people don't mind the strings going a little dull sounding, but eventually it gets too dull for them so they change every 2 or 3 months. Other people don't care or else they prefer a duller sound so they wait til the strings start feeling nasty, not holding tuning, or break. If you buy coated strings they tend to last longer before sounding completely dead, but they don't have such a bright crisp sound that regular strings have when they're new.

I used to always change mine every couple of months or so when I was playing with my band and gigging a little. Enough to keep them sounding decent, but not often enough to be spending a ton of money on strings. Now I don't play as much, plus I started getting the coated strings, so I've been going like 6 months and longer.
#10
Look under the strings where they hit the frets. You'll know when.
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#12
Depends on the strings and my usage, not on how they look.
I usually use cheap strings ($2 and $3 a set in bulk) and change often on guitars that I'm using a lot. And by often, I'm talking a week to a month.
Guitars that are sitting a lot will get changed every six months or so, and if they're just sort of stored, I'll put Elixirs on them and change them when they feel or look bad.

I *do* like the sound of fresh new strings (some think they're too trebly), and if there's an important gig, they'll get Dean Markley Blue Steels (whatever they are) as a sort of treat. They're bright and crisp and last a bit longer than the cheap GHS Boomers (and the like) that I'll ordinarily toss on there.

I have friends whose strings are virtually black with corrosion (sometimes within a day or two, thanks to their body chemistry), and that have rusticles hanging off the underside of the string. They're hard to bend and they chew up your fingers like hacksaw blades, and inevitably they break. In that condition, they also chew up your frets, so the false economy of NOT changing them makes no sense to me.
#13
Every few years. And if one breaks, i saved the strings from the last change so find one of those that fits.