#2
D112 in the very middle of the kick, flat-facing onto the batter.

4050 on Reso head, 6 inches back from the very middle.

Mix and EQ to taste
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#3
D112 in, quite a bit inside the drum, pointing at the batter head.

Beta 52 out, a few inches out from the hole in the head.

EQ and compress to taste. Check phase.
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#4
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Check phase.


Whoops, I forgot a step
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#6
Depends on genre, but generally (when I can get my hands on it) a Beta 91A placed inside the kick combined with a kick-out (Beta 52 or similar) and/or subkick mic.
#7
I am an outlier. I use a D112 outside the drum, right next to the beater to capture the head strike without all the internal resonance. It is a tighter kick sound that is easier for me to work with in the mix. Minimal EQ and no f***ing gates ever. Good results.
"Your sound is in your hands as much as anything. It's the way you pick, and the way you hold the guitar, more than it is the amp or the guitar you use." -- Stevie Ray Vaughan

"Anybody can play. The note is only 20 percent. The attitude of the motherfucker who plays it is 80 percent." -- Miles Davis

Guthrie on tone: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zmohdG9lLqY
#8
Quote by Keskimaki
Throw a Beta 52 in through the sound hole, replace with a sample, done.


I have a tendency to think that people who do this all the time are hacks.
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#9
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I have a tendency to think that people who do this all the time are hacks.
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I have a tendency to think that people who do this all the time are hacks.

Well I think 'whatever works works'

Of course it depends a bit on genre/the sound you're going for/quality of the drummer etc, but if it sounds better than

Pretty much all the advice in this thread is decent. Generally I try to get the majority of my kick sound from the inside mic, the second is mainly to fill out the low end and sometimes to provide a bit of midrange.
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#11
Cajundaddy how do you get the D112 all the way in there AND pointed at the batter head? The sideways-aiming jack/mount on those things is a bit weird. Have one of those newer ones with the swivel head?

Anyone ever have trouble with the air pressure coming out of the hole in the resonant head, if you have your mic positioned there?

Also, has anyone had trouble dealing with the kick bleed in a bottom snare mic? I find that it's troublesome in a mix the moment I have to do any real work on the kick sound, and especially if I have to actually edit the kick drum strike position.
#12
Beta 52 and SM57 inside at batter head (or Audio Technica AE2500 mic which is dynamic and condenser in one), AT4040 or U87 if you have it at outer skin level facing drummer to capture ambinence at batter level (optional), phase adjusted.

I've also done kick side SM57 to capture pedal click (phase flipped) and batter side big condenser, say AT4040 - that's pretty much Vinnie Paul's sound.
#13
Quote by Maromasqu
Cajundaddy how do you get the D112 all the way in there AND pointed at the batter head? The sideways-aiming jack/mount on those things is a bit weird. Have one of those newer ones with the swivel head?

I have a small floor swivel stand that I use for kick drum and guitar amp mics. Remember though that the D112 is a cardioid with a polar pattern like this. It doesn't have to be directly on-axis with the beater but more importantly off-axis with the loudazz snare to mute it and avoid too much bleed. Done correctly, you don't need to filter too much snare later.
"Your sound is in your hands as much as anything. It's the way you pick, and the way you hold the guitar, more than it is the amp or the guitar you use." -- Stevie Ray Vaughan

"Anybody can play. The note is only 20 percent. The attitude of the motherfucker who plays it is 80 percent." -- Miles Davis

Guthrie on tone: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zmohdG9lLqY
Last edited by Cajundaddy at Dec 19, 2016,
#15
Cajundaddy Good info there.

diabolical Yeah the double kick always ends up being interesting. The few drummers I've worked with who use it are typically confounded at how different the drum sounds between the two different beaters, when they're listening to the recording. Thankfully, fans of the double kick tend to want sample replacement or strong augmentation, and so do I when I listen to their reference choices.

Anyone have any experience with a Sennheiser e602?
#16
e602 is a nice mic too. Kick mics are pretty much boring subject to me, it is either / or of the B52 or e602, for metal the e602 is a bit crispier sounding. You can coax the right sound out of both though, since we eq and compress kicks heavily, IMO it is not a problem. If we're talking the AE2500 which is a fantastic 2 in 1 (dynamic & condenser) which would be my choice but studios I've worked with wouldn't shell that much for kick mic.

When we're talking double kick - I actually go for more organic sounds, but the drummer must know how to tune both kicks to the same pitch, the skins have to be the same brand and age as well as the beaters. Then the drummer has to be able to play both kicks with the same authority, the better the drummer the less you'll have to do. Usually newbs stink so bad on the second kick that the volume differs, the feel differs and sound replacement is in store.

I usually like the kicks to be a little different either in real audio recording or sound augmentation, so that way you can feel that there are two different drums.

For the most part, metal production has become this inorganic, tepid, overproduced mess that I find akin to pop music nowadays, and I tend not to be the producer of choice as my recording values are more in tune with 70s and early 80s metal albums.
#17
Quote by diabolical

For the most part, metal production has become this inorganic, tepid, overproduced mess that I find akin to pop music nowadays, and I tend not to be the producer of choice as my recording values are more in tune with 70s and early 80s metal albums.


I would agree with this 110%. The modern metal all sounds the same. The same sampled/replaced drums, the same farty and hollow guitars, the same over produced vocals.

While I'm no major fan of early 80's metal, at least you could easily identify the bands by their sound. All these new DJENT BROOTZ bands all sound exactly the same. They even play the same riffs/drum lines.

I'd image that would be boring as hell to record. Metal has gone down the shitter in terms of production (and content) and the few bands that actually push the envelope basically went BACK in time and now are considered AVANT GUARD or some shit like that, because people are dumb.
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#19
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I would agree with this 110%. The modern metal all sounds the same. The same sampled/replaced drums, the same farty and hollow guitars, the same over produced vocals.

While I'm no major fan of early 80's metal, at least you could easily identify the bands by their sound. All these new DJENT BROOTZ bands all sound exactly the same. They even play the same riffs/drum lines.

I'd image that would be boring as hell to record. Metal has gone down the shitter in terms of production (and content) and the few bands that actually push the envelope basically went BACK in time and now are considered AVANT GUARD or some shit like that, because people are dumb.
Problem here is (speaking from experience), if you DON'T make your modern-metal mix sound like everyone else with that same over-hashed Sturgis-inspired sound where everything is processed to death, you're passed off as either an amateur or hack. Whether it's artistic choice or not.

People in metal have a tendency to regard to a "professional" mix simply as one that sounds like everyone else.
#20
Hi I use a D112 inside pointing at the beater at a 45 degree angle to get rid of some of the rushing air and then a 57 pointing at beater outside on drummers side to get some click


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#21
Quote by Cherry Vulpine
Problem here is (speaking from experience), if you DON'T make your modern-metal mix sound like everyone else with that same over-hashed Sturgis-inspired sound where everything is processed to death, you're passed off as either an amateur or hack. Whether it's artistic choice or not.

People in metal have a tendency to regard to a "professional" mix simply as one that sounds like everyone else.


Yeah, totally true! Lately that trend has seen some bucking thanks to the stoner/doom/jam bands out there. There are some awfully fuzzed out farted out productions out there, like say Bongripper that are breaking molds and putting things back to where they should rest, on the artist's vision. I think a sonic imprint says as much as the songwriting, in some instances even more. What would Bathory's "Under The Sign of the Black Mark" or Venom's "Welcome to Hell" be with a proper Sturgis production? Probably power metal at best