#1
Hello, so today i was fumbling around with different chords and came up with these 2 chords (sorry for lack of names im not very adept in that category)
E D F# A C# and the second chord is E A E G# D# i assume the first one is some long extension and the 2nd is a split chord(?) again im not very adept in those skills. each of these chords when played seems to point towards A major scale, Sometimes the a Locrian, and then obviously the relative minor. What i wanted to know was which scales would work with either chord, or both chords together. if you point me towards a lesson somewhere that teaches how to identify which scales would work over them it would help a lot. or tell me why other scales wouldnt work over the progression it would help a lot thanks!
"Hey "man" chill"
#2
without more info on how the chords are used-they could be several-though your hint at A major helps a bit but does not mean it is in the key of A ..

the first could be D maj 9 with E in the bass if that is how it is voiced..again with out context is just a guess..could also be F# mi7/6

the other chord could be E Ma11 (no 5th)

Your ear will tell you what works against stuff like this...as far as lessons..some theory/harmony will help..your reference to "a Locrian" seems to support my suggestion

as for scales to play over these..much of that is up to you..but begin with A major F# minor and E major .. if you have the entire progression of the tune so we can see the chords in context that would help alot
play well

wolf
Last edited by wolflen at Dec 15, 2016,
#3
If the first one has E in bass, then that's the root. Calling it Dmaj7/E could make it easier to read, though. But yeah, it's E13sus4. That's what it will most likely sound like. The second one is pretty ambiguous. The lowest notes (E, A, E) kind of make A sound like the root, so it could be Amaj7#11/E (lacks the third but in context it would be implied). It could also be Emaj7add11 but natural 11th is usually not used in maj7 chords. I think the E in the bass makes the chord sound pretty ambiguous and you may want to try it with A as the lowest note. Or maybe get rid of that A completely. Then again, if you like the sound of the chord the way it is, do whatever you want.
Quote by AlanHB
Just remember that there are no boring scales, just boring players.

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#4
Quote by Zoomer428
Hello, so today i was fumbling around with different chords and came up with these 2 chords (sorry for lack of names im not very adept in that category)
E D F# A C# and the second chord is E A E G# D# i assume the first one is some long extension and the 2nd is a split chord(?) again im not very adept in those skills. each of these chords when played seems to point towards A major scale, Sometimes the a Locrian, and then obviously the relative minor. What i wanted to know was which scales would work with either chord, or both chords together. if you point me towards a lesson somewhere that teaches how to identify which scales would work over them it would help a lot. or tell me why other scales wouldnt work over the progression it would help a lot thanks!
No one scale works on both chords, because one has a D and the other a D#.
A couple of scales will fit the first one: D or A major. Only E major will fit the second.

How would you know that? By knowing your major scales!

D major = D E F# G A B C#
A major = A B C# D E F# G#

E major = E F# G# A B C# D#

- so you can see each of your chords takes all its notes from one of those scales. Even though the 2nd one only has 4 different notes, the notes chosen limit it to one scale - there's only really 3 choices for the missing 3 notes (F#, B, C#). The other reason is that every common scale has two half-steps in it - and your chord contains both (D#-E and G#-A), so there's only one scale it can be.

The first chord has 5 different notes, but one of the missing ones is variable - the missing G could be G or G# (the missing B could not really be Bb... unless you want to dig out D harmonic major and blow the dust off it ).

Come to think of it E harmonic major could also fit chord 2. E F# G# A B C D#.

Then again assuming you want these chords to sound good together, you should maximise the shared notes, which means using A major for the first one and E major for the second - the only difference being D/D#.

Oh yes - why does it work? Because you like the sound! Personally I find the second chord sounds a bit too odd, so for me it doesn't "work". Theory doesn't tell you why things work. It only names the sounds, and outlines common practices. It doesn't ask why those practices are common.
Last edited by jongtr at Dec 16, 2016,
#6
Quote by cdgraves
Does it work?
The OP clearly thinks so. Which means it does.

I guess the question remains, how many other listeners would it work for?