#1
I have bought a new electric guitar from Thomann.de:

Ibanez AS93-VLS[/https://www.thomann.de/se/ibanez_as93vls.htm?ref=search_rslt_AS93_167597_0]

I'm having trouble getting it to sound right with some chords.

Instead of getting a clean chord, it almost sounds as if I apply vibrato. The strings are very sensitive, slightest movement up or down increases the strange sound.

The chords are ones that primarily use the upper (thinner) 3-4 strings: A, Am, D, Dm, F, C

Neck seems straight. Strings are in tune.

Could anyone please help with a remedy?
wiciman
Last edited by oscar.heimburg at Dec 16, 2016,
#2
Chances are good that you're pressing too hard on the strings. You need a light touch; just enough to fret the string. If you're pulling the strings all the way down to the fretboard, you're pulling them sharp, and they'll be off compared tot he other strings. If you haven't played an electric guitar before, you have to get used to letting the pickups do the work. The thin strings make it easier for you to bend and apply vibrato, but they also make it easy for you to Gorilla Grip (Trandmark Applied For) your chords.
#4
The vibrato sound, to me, sounds like the guitar is very slightly out of tune. Before you intonate the guitar(which is very very slightly tuning the guitar) try tuning again a few times and even tuning the guitar so that an individual chord sounds good and then see if the open strings are still in tune. A new guitar has to be broken in and guitars often need to be tuned to themselves instead of a tuner.
#5
I'd check the intonation.
Give your self the time to be a Beginner... because no one started as a Professional.
#6
Have you changed the strings since you acquired the guitar? There's no telling how old those strings are - sitting in shipping containers, warehouses, etc.

Start simple and see if you have the same issues with fresh strings of the same gauge.
Guitars:
Jackson Kelly KE3 - MIJ (Distortion/Jazz)
Jackson DKMGT Dinky (EMG 81/85)
ESP E-II Eclipse Custom (JB/'59)
ESP LTD EC-1001FR (EMG 81/60)
Fender MIM Strat

Amps:
Mesa/Boogie Dual Rectifier Roadster 212
Laney IronHeart IRT-Studio
Peavey Vypyr 30
Peavey ReValver Amp Sims
TOOOO many T.C. Electronic Pedals. . .
#7
did you have the guitar "set up" by an experienced person/shop..if not there are several reasons, intonation, neck adjustment and string gauge can be major factors

A pro set up is worth every penny..
play well

wolf
#8
wolflen

No funds yet to have a luthier check all those parameters. Will however try new strings. Somebody suggested a heavier gauge to those that Ibanez puts on as standard?
wiciman
#9
oscar.heimburg

If start with the same guage as factory stock. Check their website and put on a set of Ernie Ball or D'Addario.

You can have the shop but them on and most will do a very basic setup with the cost of a string change. Just go talk to the local shop. Most will treat you right so you will come back and spend more money with them.
Guitars:
Jackson Kelly KE3 - MIJ (Distortion/Jazz)
Jackson DKMGT Dinky (EMG 81/85)
ESP E-II Eclipse Custom (JB/'59)
ESP LTD EC-1001FR (EMG 81/60)
Fender MIM Strat

Amps:
Mesa/Boogie Dual Rectifier Roadster 212
Laney IronHeart IRT-Studio
Peavey Vypyr 30
Peavey ReValver Amp Sims
TOOOO many T.C. Electronic Pedals. . .
#11
I guess I have Gorilla Grip :-)

Another, perhaps joined matter; the string height seem pretty high. What is the best way of lowering the action? Should I lower the entire bridge via the two fingertwisting adjustment screws, or is it better to adjust each string individually?

The guitar use this kind of bridge.
wiciman
Last edited by oscar.heimburg at Jan 18, 2017,
#12
You can use either the bridge mounting studs or the individual saddles to lower the action.

If you're adjusting the action with the mounting studs, you'll want to detune all the strings before doing so, as rotating the studs while the strings are under full tension, can damage the contact points between the studs and the baseplate. For the bridge to work effectively, those contact points (called knife edges) need to be sharp. By rotating the stud you grind away that sharp edge of the knife edges and the bridge will not stay in tune as well. Once you;ve ground the knife edges away, there's no way to undo the damage without buying a new bridge. So bear this in mind before adjusting it.


If you're adjusting the action with the individual saddles, you're likely to mess up the bridge's string radius. The radius of the strings is intended to match that of the fretboard curvature so the ease of play of each string is consistent from one string to the next. This is adjusted by raising/lowering the height of the individual saddles.

If you adjust the height of one saddle, you need to also adjust the height of all the others to maintain consistent playability between strings. There's no easy way to measure how much you need to adjust the saddles without a set of special string radius gauges like these.

http://www.stewmac.com/Luthier_Tools/Tools_by_Job/Tools_for_Necks_and_Fingerboards/Understring_Radius_Gauges.html?gclid=CMrD07G3y9ECFY-ZGwod9fkEhQ

The idea is you set the action of the low and high E strings to what you want, and then use the gauge with the radius that matches the guitar's fretboard radius to help guide you as to how much you need to adjust the height of all the other saddles to suit.

It sounds really complicated but in reality its very simple. The video in that link shows you what to do a lot better than it can be explained over text.

Once the action is set how you like it, it is also suggested to check the accuracy of the guitar's intonation, as action adjustments can make the intonation point of the guitar change.
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#14
The exact action height is subjective to a degree as everyone plays their guitar differently. Some people like the action to the deck, others like the action slightly higher. Some people are totally intolerant to any fret buzz while others are willing to live with a little buzz if it'll give them the playability they want. With that said, there are settings that aren't optimally suited to some people, but at least they get the guitar in a decently playing condition.

I'd start with 2mm on the 6th string and 1.8mm on the 1st at the 12th fret and find the string height that is optimal for playability and no fret buzz (or however little buzz you're willing accept) from there.
Quote by Axelfox
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