#1
Hey guys I was just thinking and wondering if anyone has ever worn down a poly finish like nitro instead of the poly just chipping. Also does poly age? It may be a stupid question XD, but it is my question.
#2
Everything ages on a long enough timeline, but poly doesn't age in the way that old nitro aged. New nitro doesn't even age the way that old nitro did. The properties that made the old stuff age fairly quickly also meant that it was volatile and pretty nasty stuff, environmentally. The new formulations are required to be more stable, which means aging is slower and less pronounced. Poly is even more stable, and in a lot of cases will look factory-fresh after 30 years with just a bit of polish.

I haven't ever seen poly wear naturally by thinning out. I'm sure it's possible under some circumstances, but it's very unlikely. The old nitro guitars you see with the "relic" look were generally played hard for 30+ years with that original recipe nitro which was fragile and thin. My Les Paul has a newer formula nitro finish, and it's almost 25 years old with a ton of play time on it. It has a lot of dings and dents, but the finish hasn't even begun to wear through in the way that you see on those old "heavy relic" type instruments, around the forearm and picking areas, or on the back of the neck. I'm sure the finish is thinner in some spots, but you can't see down to the wood anywhere except where it has gotten chipped or dented. Besides a few more dents and a bit of clouding in the finish, it doesn't look appreciably different than it did 10 years ago.

Poly is even more resilient than that, by a fair margin, so I really don't think you'd be likely to wear through it naturally within a single lifetime. A belt sander might do it.
#3
Quote by Roc8995
Everything ages on a long enough timeline, but poly doesn't age in the way that old nitro aged. New nitro doesn't even age the way that old nitro did. The properties that made the old stuff age fairly quickly also meant that it was volatile and pretty nasty stuff, environmentally. The new formulations are required to be more stable, which means aging is slower and less pronounced. Poly is even more stable, and in a lot of cases will look factory-fresh after 30 years with just a bit of polish.

I haven't ever seen poly wear naturally by thinning out. I'm sure it's possible under some circumstances, but it's very unlikely. The old nitro guitars you see with the "relic" look were generally played hard for 30+ years with that original recipe nitro which was fragile and thin. My Les Paul has a newer formula nitro finish, and it's almost 25 years old with a ton of play time on it. It has a lot of dings and dents, but the finish hasn't even begun to wear through in the way that you see on those old "heavy relic" type instruments, around the forearm and picking areas, or on the back of the neck. I'm sure the finish is thinner in some spots, but you can't see down to the wood anywhere except where it has gotten chipped or dented. Besides a few more dents and a bit of clouding in the finish, it doesn't look appreciably different than it did 10 years ago.

Poly is even more resilient than that, by a fair margin, so I really don't think you'd be likely to wear through it naturally within a single lifetime. A belt sander might do it.

Sweet I like my guitars looking new, especially if it's been finished really well, thanks for the reply!