#1
Hey guys, I rock a Telecaster Modern Player Plus, and many moons ago I painted the pick guard, yellow blue and red, 3 stripes done equally. With the stickers I have on here, I think the shit looks tite. The problem is I painted it with like, interior wall paint (the paint that was used for the walls in my house, incidentally). The problem with this paint is that it just sorta chips off cuz it wasn't really made to take abuse. It also got some dust and dirt and stuff stuck in it while drying , so I'm ready to repaint it. Is there a site where I can order custom painted pick guards? Or if not is there a certain type of paint/finish I should use that'd work better for this?
So far I've only found one site that stocks replacement pickguards for this style of guitar, so I imagine getting a custom one would be expensive, if not nearly impossible to find
Pic Related; I just wanted to show off my baby girl
#3
Quote by Tony Done
Could you make your own? I use clear acrylic from the hardware store and paint it from the back.

I remember years ago me and my grandpa tried making a wooden one but we couldn't get it to work. Neither of us had steady enough hands to cut it right, and we didn't have great tools either (we did the bulk of the work with a router). WDMusic has precut ones but then theres still the question of what kind of paint I should be using
#4
Painting the top of the pickguard is a problem, because the paint is thin, soft and might not stick very well. - After all, the whole point of plastic pickguards is to protect the more fragile paint finish.

Can you get a transparent pickguard anywhere? That would solve the problem, because you can paint it from the back. I cover mine with carpet tape and aluminium foil when the paint is dry to act as shielding, though that isn't really necessary on a tele. If you try this, don't used acrylic unless you want a marbled finish, use poly.
#5
Quote by Tony Done
Painting the top of the pickguard is a problem, because the paint is thin, soft and might not stick very well. - After all, the whole point of plastic pickguards is to protect the more fragile paint finish.

Can you get a transparent pickguard anywhere? That would solve the problem, because you can paint it from the back. I cover mine with carpet tape and aluminium foil when the paint is dry to act as shielding, though that isn't really necessary on a tele. If you try this, don't used acrylic unless you want a marbled finish, use poly.

Precut clear acrylics are about 20$ extra :/. Would some kind of varnish or shellac work? I think I have some old cans lying around. And I actually did shield my pick guard when I first painted it with spray adhesive and aluminum foil
#8
Expensive eh? Still a reasonable option if you want classy home-made pickguard though. One good thing about painting clear acrylic from the back is that you can clean it off and start again if you don't like it. I haven't done anything fancy on pickguards, but I've made lap steel fretboards in the old Supro style by the same method, and had to start over a few times.
#10
Quote by Tony Done
Could you make your own? I use clear acrylic from the hardware store and paint it from the back.


Thats really the only way to paint your own pickguard.

This was all done on the back:

#11
The plastic paint sounds good. I was going to suggest enamel paint. One should always scratchpad the part before painting. That helps the paint to not flake off later. Scratch pads are like scouring pads but are rated like sand paper.
Last edited by geo-rage at Dec 23, 2016,
#13
Quote by Tony Done
CodeMonk

Is that decals? I've only ever done simple patterns, using masking techniques.


Not decals.
Read the link in my sig about making your own PCBs.
I used the same technique to apply the design to the plastic (actually I used Lexan which I prefer over anything else since its pretty much impossible to break Lexan).
Then I soaked the pickguard in water for about an hour or so I guess, then I spray painted the back of the pickguard with some shade of white paint.
Took me like 6 or 7 different shades of white to get it right (I wanted to try to match the pickup rings) as the Lexan changed the shade of the color a little bit when viewed from the other side.

I used bits from MC Escher's Study For Stars ( http://www.mcescher.com/gallery/back-in-holland/study-for-stars/ ) for the images.
Then I ran Paint Shop Pro's Negative filter to get the final image.
Last edited by CodeMonk at Dec 24, 2016,