#1
I'm awful at theory. I'm trying to notate one of my first songs, and I'm having difficulty finding the correct rhythm notation for this particular riff. The main riff starts at 1:06 ends at 1:18. I use two chords, C7M and Em7. I've updated my awful recording of the song, and again I'm not even sure what tempo or time signature I'm using. But can anyone give me a rough idea of what the notation would be for this riff?

Here's the link to download the song for free.

https://www.mediafire.com/?a78m25ci41c5c02

Thank you!
Dylan
Last edited by HomoSum at Dec 19, 2016,
#2
4/4 time signature (you can figure this out by first finding the pulse and finding where the "one" - the beat that gets emphasis - is, then count how many beats there are between the first beat of one bar and the first beat of the next bar).

Once you have found the pulse and the time signature, just subdivide the beats and figure out which notes fall on which beats/subdivisions (slow it down and this will be much easier).

Here is the rhythm of the riff:

1 e & a 2 e & a 3 e & a 4 e & a
x       x     x   x     x   x x


Now you should be able to notate it.


BTW, your sense of rhythm will improve if you practice with a metronome.
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#3
I really appreciate you answering my post! However, I'm really struggling with the actual notation part. Like writing it on the staff. I figured the riff out similar to the way you did, but I can't figure out the rests/dotted notes/bars for this riff on a classical staff.

Hence, why I'm awful at notation. :/
#4
Ah, beaten to it.
But, that's quite easy. (I'd have more problem with the timing on the start of the song!)
You're tuned down a half step right? So you're playing something like this (obviously not with the whole chord strummed each time).
Tempo is approximate, as you speed up a bit. And the very first chord strum lasts too long, unless that's a deliberate effect you're going for.

#5
1 e & a 2 e & a 3 e & a 4 e & a
x       x     x   x     x   x x


a quarter note takes up all of the 1 e & a. An eighth note would take up the space of 1 e, another eighth right after would take up & a. A sixteenth would take up any single one of those.

Dotted notes take the next smallest value and sticks it to the one you dotted. So a dotted quarter note is like a quarter note plus an eighth note, or three eighth notes. A dotted eighth note is like an eighth note plus a sixteenth note, or 3 sixteenth notes.

Rests are the same as notes, except you're silent during a rest. Timing works exactly the same for them.
Last edited by The4thHorsemen at Dec 19, 2016,
#6
NSpen1, the first chord I suppose would be dotted to last a little longer for emphasis. How much would that change the notation you did? And I was just playing in standard. Your notation looks nearly like mine, mine's just sloppy. Thank you everyone for the help on this!
#7
NSpen1 can you upload the gp file? I want to edit it a bit.


1 e & a 2 e & a 3 e & a 4 e & a
D       D*  d U   u d   D   d u

* = staccato
CAPITAL LETTERS = louder

HomoSum, btw- invariably quality then number. CM7, Em7 (and then tuning adjustment)
#8
Like I said, quality is poor. I wrote it quickly for notation help. Tuning shouldn't have been too bad, it's probably just my playing! And I'm trying to notate it to clean it up and less variable in terms of rhythm.
#9
HomoSum
hmm, you could either make the first bar of the riff 9/8 and make the first chord a dotted quarter, or you could have it starting an eighth note before the start of the bar and tie it across the barline.

To match your recording I have to play the chords as Bmaj7 and Ebm7 on my standard tuned guitar, that's why I thought you were tuned down a half step ...
#11
HomoSum the tuning isn't bad, it's just 1/2-step down

Try a click track or something and play to that, if that helps. Also, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fermata
(However, I think you were just accelerating from measure 1, which is why the first note may feel ungodly long)

NSpen1 to preserve the bVImaj7-im7 relationship, either Cbmaj7-Ebm7 or Bmaj7-D#m7 would be most appropriate

Thanks for the gp5 file, updated with staccato, more dynamic differentiation, rhythm, slide in the middle
Attachments:
116008__Dylan.gp5
#12
Quote by NeoMvsEu
NSpen1 to preserve the bVImaj7-im7 relationship, either Cbmaj7-Ebm7 or Bmaj7-D#m7 would be most appropriate

Yeah yeah, I know, I just start off thinking of the most common name for the chords, and forget to put them together theoretically sometimes.
I hear the extra little details in the rhythm now, although good luck if you wanted to try notating exactly which strings are strummed each time!
#13
Quote by NeoMvsEu
Thanks for the gp5 file, updated with staccato, more dynamic differentiation, rhythm, slide in the middle

That's great, except because you use TuxGuitar, the staccato and slide downwards in the last bar don't work in Guitar Pro
#16
Quote by NSpen1
Yeah yeah, I know, I just start off thinking of the most common name for the chords, and forget to put them together theoretically sometimes.
I hear the extra little details in the rhythm now, although good luck if you wanted to try notating exactly which strings are strummed each time!
I've actually specified strumming strings before, even though it takes forever
Quote by NSpen1
That's great, except because you use TuxGuitar, the staccato and slide downwards in the last bar don't work in Guitar Pro
meh, it works from my locality
#17
Quote by NeoMvsEu
I've actually specified strumming strings before, even though it takes forever


I've done this a few times before as well. There was a period of time where I always tried to get every little detail with ghost note hammer-ons and all that. Extremely tedious. Now I mostly just use guitar pro for sketching out ideas or to make sure I don't forget something.
Last edited by The4thHorsemen at Dec 20, 2016,