#1
I've been wanting to play Coheed and Cambria Sentry The Defiant on acoustic guitar. I've seen that it was in B standard. I lost my tuner and I'm using the app to tune down to B. For some reason something doesn't seem right. I go through basic chords after tuning and they sound out but the strings are super floppy and kind of hard to play. Is there something I need to do, am I being too picky with the sound? I don't know if I can use a capo to get the sound to be more crisp. Capos will only let you go higher in sound not lower, right? I appreciate any feedback and tips.
#2
Really heavy strings will restore some of your string tension. Acoustic guitars are a lot more sensitive to alt tuning than most electrics so a complete setup for down tuning is probably needed.
"Your sound is in your hands as much as anything. It's the way you pick, and the way you hold the guitar, more than it is the amp or the guitar you use." -- Stevie Ray Vaughan

"Anybody can play. The note is only 20 percent. The attitude of the motherfucker who plays it is 80 percent." -- Miles Davis

Guthrie on tone: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zmohdG9lLqY
#4
What would be considered a complete set up for down tuning an acoustic guitar that far? Should I buy another acoustic specifically for this range of sound? Maybe with heavy gauge strings?
#5
Yeah. Bb is really low for a standard acoustic guitar. The act of fretting the strings at such low tension leads to poor intonation so chords sound awful. Heavier gauge strings might help but it's still not going to be great.

If you want to use such low tuning you really need a baritone guitar.
#6
Quote by dodgen1989
What would be considered a complete set up for down tuning an acoustic guitar that far? Should I buy another acoustic specifically for this range of sound? Maybe with heavy gauge strings?
Acoustics are more string tension dependent than electrics for their setup geometry. What I'm saying is, were you to take an acoustic from standard tuning , (E-e), down to B-b, over a certain period the body geometry might change. You could wind up with the strings, (assuming you used the same gauge), almost laying on the fret board. That would necessitate shimming the saddle up,

I had an acoustic sitting out of its case when a cold snap hit. What had been murky weather in the 60's outside hit the 20's. Within about a day, the guitar flatted almost 50 cents across the board, most like due to the loss of humidity. It even lowered the strings enough to notice it in its playability. I think you could certainly expect some thing like that to happen with such a huge down tune.

Don't expect to be able to bounce the tuning back and forth between B and E, you'll need another guitar. For one or two songs, would it be worth it to you?

You could setup for B-b, and a capo on the 4th to give you standard tuning. But I think you'd find out you'd be running out of neck rather quickly, with the capo basically only 10 frets from the body.
Last edited by Captaincranky at Dec 20, 2016,
#7
Intonation has been mentioned. Heavier strings will generally have to be longer for correct intonation than lighter ones, so you might find that heavy strings with the present saddle get progressively sharper as you move up the fretboard. I had this problem recently on my reso uke, and had to install a new saddle behind the original.
#8
What's the difference between a regular acoustic and a baritone guitar? I know switching between E and B standard is too much for a guitar. I'm tuning back up to E and I'll just deviate on drop D to get the chords I want for this particular song. I am curious about acoustic guitars specifically for lower tunes.
#9
Quote by Captaincranky
You could setup for B-b, and a capo on the 4th to give you standard tuning. But I think you'd find out you'd be running out of neck rather quickly, with the capo basically only 10 frets from the body.


5th fret you mean? ; )

What's the difference between a regular acoustic and a baritone guitar?/QUOTE]

A baritone guitar is a guitar that is made for lower tuning. There can be various construction differences one of the most common is a longer scale. Remember, the three main factors in string pitch are length, gauge, and tension so making the scale longer means you can have higher tension with the same gauges.
There's no such thing; there never was. Where I am going you cannot follow me now.
#10
Quote by theogonia777
5th fret you mean? ; ) ...[ ]....
Right you are. I can't count. I can't read either, since I used to work for the post office.....Er, is that off topic?