#1
Hello guys, this morning I was reflecting on my years of practicing and playing the guitar and had this thought on a big mistake I've made :

I can see a lot of guitar students falling in the same trap, I myself fell in this trap…

We all start playing an instrument because of the music we love. We listen to that music all the time, we transcribe it, we learn the language and with enough practice, we become good at it.

A few years go by and we start to get interest for music that is more complex and that is feeding our infinite desire to become better at what we do. So, we listen to that music all the time, we transcribe it, we learn the language and with enough practice, we become good at it.

Another few years go by and we realize that our playing has gone nowhere. Our brain is filled with ideas but they never seem to properly link to each other. There’s no uniformity.

The problem is that when we learn new vocabulary or new techniques, we often put aside what we already know. We create a bunch of small and poor languages instead of creating a big and rich one.

How can you avoid that?

Start developing your playing from where you’re at!

Always try to find ways to blend new vocabulary with the one you already own. Combine different techniques, make them complete each other. Think of your playing as a territory that needs to expend.
This way you will develop a style of playing that is not only very rich but also unique, and this is quite a big deal for a musician.

Anyway this was my thought and kind of "advice" of the day. Please tell me what you think and if by any mean you can relate to what I've said.
#2
clauderuellemusic okay but do you have a practical method to take away here? you have suggested a method that is pretty much just an abstract thought, how do we do this?

i think to a degree genres will sound like the genres because of the "language" they are written in. it all revolves around music so the actual mechanics between genres will remain constant, but how they are put together is what changes methinks. so to a degree, you have to have separation of languages or you'll end up with a messy representation of a few genres and not really sound coherent. to another degree, languages do blend- but adding a funk dorian riff into djent would just be a jarring sound.

another facet is that i don't put aside what i already know when i learn knew stuff, why would i? why would i forgo the usage of a pentatonic scale when i learn the aeolian scale? or rather, if i do leave some thought process behind, it is because it was WRONG in the first place and it was replaced with the correct thought process, therefore i never really "knew" the first process.

also also, you should have posted this in musician talk because this will probably be one of the few serious replies you get in the pit.
Last edited by Will Lane at Dec 20, 2016,
#3
I don't feel my technique has particularly improved at all in the past 3 or 4 years, which has definitely bugged me.
#4
Will Lane there are many applications to this concept, and I think you should find what works the best for you. I can give you a very simple example to illustrate what I mean :

So let's say you've started to learn how to improvise by transcribing some blues licks. You're pretty comfortable with the basic blues vocabulary and the pentatonic scale.

You then see a video of your favorite guitarist playing an awesome lick and telling you that he uses a Dorian scale. So you go ahead and learn how to play the Dorian scale. This is 7 positions that you have to memorize on your neck, added to the 5 positions of the pentatonic scale. You work hard and finally memorize them.

You now know the 7 positions of the Dorian scale + the 5 positions of the pentatonic scale.

If you're a beginner or intermediate player, chances are that you will not know how to apply this knowledge. You'll ask yourself : Where and when should I use the Dorian or pentatonic scale? Should I use both? How can I link them? Which position should I use? Basically you'll be stuck.

What I would recommend is that instead of learning the 7 positions of the Dorian scale you try to integrate the sound of the Dorian mode into what you already know.

For instance : The intervals of the minor pentatonic scale are 1 b3 4 5. By adding a major 6th you will have the sound of the Dorian mode. So by just adding one note to each position, you will be able to play Dorian licks. And because you're already comfortable with pentatonic playing, incorporating the Dorian mode into your playing will be easier and faster.

Hope you get my point. If not just tell me so that I try to explain better.
#5
I like St. Anger. Ridicule me, daddy

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#6
Decent thread. I agree to an extent. If you're just starting out, like a total beginner, then you should be aiming to play as many different styles as possible so you can have a deep understanding of music. If you only learn blues scales, then after 3-4 years that's all you'll really be able to play. It's never a good idea to limit yourself when the possibilities of guitar music are endless and infinite. I agree that because there is so much to learn, it's good not to overwhelm yourself and just focus on what you've already mastered, but that's only in the long-run of songwriting or being in a band and collaborating with like-minded musicians, not really the learning experience of guitar itself.
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#7
Why are you eating your telecaster? Does it taste good? Have I been doing it wrong all these years?
Quote by zgr0826
My culture is worthless and absolutely inferior to the almighty Leaf.


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I incurred the wrath of the Association of White Knights. Specifically the Parent's Basement branch of service.
#8
Quote by H4T3BR33D3R
Why are you eating your telecaster? Does it taste good? Have I been doing it wrong all these years?


Walnuts are pretty tasty, there was a mixup in product descriptions.
o()o

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#9
Quote by EpiExplorer
Walnuts are pretty tasty, there was a mixup in product descriptions.


mine is ash though
Quote by zgr0826
My culture is worthless and absolutely inferior to the almighty Leaf.


Quote by JustRooster
I incurred the wrath of the Association of White Knights. Specifically the Parent's Basement branch of service.
#11
Quote by clauderuellemusic
k.lainad totally agree!

Will Lane Now I get your advice about putting this thread in the Musician talk forum


So do you have it plain or do you put worcestershire on it?
Quote by zgr0826
My culture is worthless and absolutely inferior to the almighty Leaf.


Quote by JustRooster
I incurred the wrath of the Association of White Knights. Specifically the Parent's Basement branch of service.
#14
Quote by clauderuellemusic
H4T3BR33D3R Plain. that's how purists have it.


Yeh but it looks like you've got an RW board and purists aren't into that. Unless you got a '52 Blackguard I don't want to put my mouth anywhere near it.
Quote by zgr0826
My culture is worthless and absolutely inferior to the almighty Leaf.


Quote by JustRooster
I incurred the wrath of the Association of White Knights. Specifically the Parent's Basement branch of service.