#1
I recently bought a esp guitar . It's m -100- fm. I am getting some warble sounds like "wmwmwmwmwmwmw " on E,B and G strings .

Plz help me ?
#3
Chill, dude! Responses take time.
Sturgeon's 2nd Law, a.k.a. Sturgeon's Revelation: “Ninety percent of everything is crap.”

Why, yes, I am a lawyer- thanks for asking!

Log off and play yer guitar!

Strap on, tune up, rock out!
#5
Quote by Udjine
Kochar, If I correctly understood your problem, the solution can be in lowering your pickups:


Already did that but ,no difference ..
#6
Have you checked for this?



All jokes aside, what's the height of your action at the first, 7th and 12th fret? You may be just barely knicking the frets enough to cause some "almost" buzz? What's your string gauge and tuning, as well?
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#7
Is this occurring on all the frets of those strings or is it only occurring on fretted notes? Is this occurring when you compare the tuning of one note to another?
Quote by TheSennaj
And well yes, I'll enjoy the carpal tunnel and tendonitis, because trying to get one is clearly smarter than any word you have spoken thus far.
#8
Quote by LaidBack
Have you checked for this?



All jokes aside, what's the height of your action at the first, 7th and 12th fret? You may be just barely knicking the frets enough to cause some "almost" buzz? What's your string gauge and tuning, as well?
you can check the action by referring the images though this link http://s377.photobucket.com/user/mohitarora198/library/
#9
Quote by T00DEEPBLUE
Is this occurring on all the frets of those strings or is it only occurring on fretted notes? Is this occurring when you compare the tuning of one note to another?

It's only on the fretted notes but , not on all frets .Mostly after 12th fret . Warbling noise is there when sustaining or bending a single note .
#10
Quote by Kochar
It's only on the fretted notes but , not on all frets .Mostly after 12th fret . Warbling noise is there when sustaining or bending a single note .

Then it's likely because your tuning or your intonation is out. It'll need adjustment.

Your action may need adjustment as well because the way you set the guitar's intonation is dependent on your string height. Low action is desirable not just because it makes the guitar easier to play, but it also allows the guitar to intonate more accurately.

The warbling sound is normal when you're bending strings because you're not muting the adjacent strings as you bend. The warbling is being caused by the harmonics of the strings that are ringing out moving in and out of phase as the bent string is changing pitch. Every string has several natural modes of motion all over the whole string, depending on where you pick along the string you excite that mode. When you excite the mode that has the same frequency as the note you are playing the two waves cancel each other out reducing the amplitude at that point of vibration.
Quote by TheSennaj
And well yes, I'll enjoy the carpal tunnel and tendonitis, because trying to get one is clearly smarter than any word you have spoken thus far.
#11
Quote by T00DEEPBLUE
Then it's likely because your tuning or your intonation is out. It'll need adjustment.

Your action may need adjustment as well because the way you set the guitar's intonation is dependent on your string height. Low action is desirable not just because it makes the guitar easier to play, but it also allows the guitar to intonate more accurately.

The warbling sound is normal when you're bending strings because you're not muting the adjacent strings as you bend. The warbling is being caused by the harmonics of the strings that are ringing out moving in and out of phase as the bent string is changing pitch. Every string has several natural modes of motion all over the whole string, depending on where you pick along the string you excite that mode. When you excite the mode that has the same frequency as the note you are playing the two waves cancel each other out reducing the amplitude at that point of vibration.
Intonation in correct . Listen to this audio . Warble is also there when guitar is unplugged .
https://soundcloud.com/stream
#12
Just because the intonation at the 12th fret is perfect does not mean the entire neck will intonate correctly. Setting the intonation at the 12th fret is always going to be a compromise, just as it would be if you set the intonation at any other point along the neck. The reality is that fretted instruments are never going to perfectly intonate. If the action is low, the intonation is set correctly, the nut is cut perfectly, the strings are fresh, the frets themselves are in good shape, you're muting all the other adjacent strings correctly at any one moment and you're still complaining of intonation problems, then that's just something you're going to have to live with. It's just an inherent limitation with your guitar.

In all fairness, this sort of problem is more prevalent on cheaper guitars.
Quote by TheSennaj
And well yes, I'll enjoy the carpal tunnel and tendonitis, because trying to get one is clearly smarter than any word you have spoken thus far.
#13
Quote by T00DEEPBLUE
Just because the intonation at the 12th fret is perfect does not mean the entire neck will intonate correctly. Setting the intonation at the 12th fret is always going to be a compromise, just as it would be if you set the intonation at any other point along the neck. The reality is that fretted instruments are never going to perfectly intonate. If the action is low, the intonation is set correctly, the nut is cut perfectly, the strings are fresh, the frets themselves are in good shape, you're muting all the other adjacent strings correctly at any one moment and you're still complaining of intonation problems, then that's just something you're going to have to live with. It's just an inherent limitation with your guitar.

In all fairness, this sort of problem is more prevalent on cheaper guitars.
It's not that it was having problem from the day I bought it . It occurred in it few days ago .
#14
Kochar What exactly did you do a few days ago?
Quote by TheSennaj
And well yes, I'll enjoy the carpal tunnel and tendonitis, because trying to get one is clearly smarter than any word you have spoken thus far.
#15
Quote by T00DEEPBLUE
Kochar What exactly did you do a few days ago?
Bro , i didn't made any changes in it's setup . While just playing I noticed this .
#16
Kochar So you're inferring is that it did occur when you first bought it, you just didn't notice it until a few days ago.

In that case I stand by what I said earlier.
Quote by TheSennaj
And well yes, I'll enjoy the carpal tunnel and tendonitis, because trying to get one is clearly smarter than any word you have spoken thus far.
#17
Quote by T00DEEPBLUE
Kochar So you're inferring is that it did occur when you first bought it, you just didn't notice it until a few days ago.

In that case I stand by what I said earlier.
Bro, i checked it properly when I was purchasing it. At that moment there wasn't any kind of issue like this .
#18
Kochar ... Right

With every other plausible cause ruled out, the next thing to do is restring your guitar and fully stretch the strings in. Then check the setup of everything. Ensure the bridge is at it's zero point. Check that the neck relief is correct. Check that the action is low without fret buzz, check that the intonation is bang on. Do these things in that order. Use a plug-in electronic chromatic tuner to check tuning and intonation. In my opinion, clip-on headstock tuners are not accurate enough to check intonation. Ensure that the Floyd stays perfectly in tune with dive bombs, pull ups and bends.

When everything checks out OK, see if the problem persists. Assuming everything is done correctly, and assuming what you said about the guitar being perfect when you bought it is true, the problem should be gone.

Without any pictures of how the guitar is set up, there is nothing else to suggest. Pictures of the action at the 12th fret, the nut action, and the neck relief would confirm whether or not those things are causing your problem.
Quote by TheSennaj
And well yes, I'll enjoy the carpal tunnel and tendonitis, because trying to get one is clearly smarter than any word you have spoken thus far.
#19
Quote by T00DEEPBLUE
Kochar ... Right

With every other plausible cause ruled out, the next thing to do is restring your guitar and fully stretch the strings in. Then check the setup of everything. Ensure the bridge is at it's zero point. Check that the neck relief is correct. Check that the action is low without fret buzz, check that the intonation is bang on. Do these things in that order. Use a plug-in electronic chromatic tuner to check tuning and intonation. In my opinion, clip-on headstock tuners are not accurate enough to check intonation. Ensure that the Floyd stays perfectly in tune with dive bombs, pull ups and bends.

When everything checks out OK, see if the problem persists. Assuming everything is done correctly, and assuming what you said about the guitar being perfect when you bought it is true, the problem should be gone.

Without any pictures of how the guitar is set up, there is nothing else to suggest. Pictures of the action at the 12th fret, the nut action, and the neck relief would confirm whether or not those things are causing your problem.
i have already uploaded pictures showing action at 1st ,12th and 24th fret . You can refer pic at this link - http://s377.photobucket.com/user/mohitarora198/library/
Last edited by Kochar at Dec 22, 2016,
#20
Kochar Link's broken.

EDIT: Fixed now.

Your action looks OK at the 24th, but the nut action is high. That can cause intonation problems.
Quote by TheSennaj
And well yes, I'll enjoy the carpal tunnel and tendonitis, because trying to get one is clearly smarter than any word you have spoken thus far.
#21
Quote by T00DEEPBLUE
Kochar Link's broken.

EDIT: Fixed now.

Your action looks OK at the 24th, but the nut action is high. That can cause intonation problems.
So , do u have any idea how can that be fixed ?
#22
Kochar That's usually fixed by flat filing down the base of the locking nut until the action is acceptable.

Other than that, restring and re-set up the guitar.
Quote by TheSennaj
And well yes, I'll enjoy the carpal tunnel and tendonitis, because trying to get one is clearly smarter than any word you have spoken thus far.
#23
T00DEEPBLUE
Or you need to file down under the nut and shim it back up to the height you want. I had a shop do this to my EC-1001. The action is great across the low frets now.

Kochar
Try changing the strings first. Anytime something just happens on it's own is typically because of the strings themselves or changes in the guitar's environment - namely temperature and humidity caused something to change like the Neck Relief. The guitar is wood and metal after all.
Guitars:
Jackson Kelly KE3 - MIJ (Distortion/Jazz)
Jackson DKMGT Dinky (EMG 81/85)
ESP E-II Eclipse Custom (JB/'59)
ESP LTD EC-1001FR (EMG 81/60)
Fender MIM Strat

Amps:
Mesa/Boogie Dual Rectifier Roadster 212
Laney IronHeart IRT-Studio
Peavey Vypyr 30
Peavey ReValver Amp Sims
TOOOO many T.C. Electronic Pedals. . .
#24
Quote by metalmingee
T00DEEPBLUE
Or you need to file down under the nut and shim it back up to the height you want. I had a shop do this to my EC-1001. The action is great across the low frets now.

Kochar
Try changing the strings first. Anytime something just happens on it's own is typically because of the strings themselves or changes in the guitar's environment - namely temperature and humidity caused something to change like the Neck Relief. The guitar is wood and metal after all.
Changed the Strings yesterday but no difference.
#25
Have you checked the neck relief? If this issue just started one day and it persisted with fresh strings then I'd start looking at what else can move/change on its own - I.e. Is not a screw or bolt.

The neck will move with temperature and humidity.

I'd do a complete setup on the guitar starting with the neck relief. There are a few philosophies about whether to change the neck relief first or last but I'd do it first in this case since it is suspect.

I believe you need a 4mm hex / Allen wrench.
Guitars:
Jackson Kelly KE3 - MIJ (Distortion/Jazz)
Jackson DKMGT Dinky (EMG 81/85)
ESP E-II Eclipse Custom (JB/'59)
ESP LTD EC-1001FR (EMG 81/60)
Fender MIM Strat

Amps:
Mesa/Boogie Dual Rectifier Roadster 212
Laney IronHeart IRT-Studio
Peavey Vypyr 30
Peavey ReValver Amp Sims
TOOOO many T.C. Electronic Pedals. . .
#26
Quote by metalmingee
Have you checked the neck relief? If this issue just started one day and it persisted with fresh strings then I'd start looking at what else can move/change on its own - I.e. Is not a screw or bolt.

The neck will move with temperature and humidity.

I'd do a complete setup on the guitar starting with the neck relief. There are a few philosophies about whether to change the neck relief first or last but I'd do it first in this case since it is suspect.

I believe you need a 4mm hex / Allen wrench.
After Installing strings on it I had checked the neck relief it was almost straight .Also I did the complete setup again properly . Intonation was near to perfect . All the screws were tight . Warble sound is there in acoustic mode too I mean when it's unplugged .Warble sound can be heard by bringing ear close to the body .
#27
Maybe the springs in on your trem are vibrating. Can you take the spring cover off and wrap a rag or something through the springs to mute them? You could just use your hand for troubleshooting.

You may also have a high fret somewhere.

As far as the neck relief goes, I'm a big fan of measuring. I run my guitars between .007" and .010" (0.18 - 0.25mm).
Guitars:
Jackson Kelly KE3 - MIJ (Distortion/Jazz)
Jackson DKMGT Dinky (EMG 81/85)
ESP E-II Eclipse Custom (JB/'59)
ESP LTD EC-1001FR (EMG 81/60)
Fender MIM Strat

Amps:
Mesa/Boogie Dual Rectifier Roadster 212
Laney IronHeart IRT-Studio
Peavey Vypyr 30
Peavey ReValver Amp Sims
TOOOO many T.C. Electronic Pedals. . .
#28
Quote by metalmingee
Maybe the springs in on your trem are vibrating. Can you take the spring cover off and wrap a rag or something through the springs to mute them? You could just use your hand for troubleshooting.

You may also have a high fret somewhere.

As far as the neck relief goes, I'm a big fan of measuring. I run my guitars between .007" and .010" (0.18 - 0.25mm).
Bro, Springs are not the culprit I had already checked that.
#29
I suggest it's time you take this in to a tech and be prepared to pay for them to shim down under the locking nut, to level a few frets, and to completely setup the guitar.

You've ruled out all of the easy things or don't have the tools to properly measure and setup the guitar.

Or live with it and invest in a higher quality guitar which will most likely need these same setup procedures.
Guitars:
Jackson Kelly KE3 - MIJ (Distortion/Jazz)
Jackson DKMGT Dinky (EMG 81/85)
ESP E-II Eclipse Custom (JB/'59)
ESP LTD EC-1001FR (EMG 81/60)
Fender MIM Strat

Amps:
Mesa/Boogie Dual Rectifier Roadster 212
Laney IronHeart IRT-Studio
Peavey Vypyr 30
Peavey ReValver Amp Sims
TOOOO many T.C. Electronic Pedals. . .
#30
Here's the update guys . My guitar was kept by the technician for 1 month and fault that was found by him was that it's neck alignment was not correct ..
#31
Fixed?
Sturgeon's 2nd Law, a.k.a. Sturgeon's Revelation: “Ninety percent of everything is crap.”

Why, yes, I am a lawyer- thanks for asking!

Log off and play yer guitar!

Strap on, tune up, rock out!
#33
Sturgeon's 2nd Law, a.k.a. Sturgeon's Revelation: “Ninety percent of everything is crap.”

Why, yes, I am a lawyer- thanks for asking!

Log off and play yer guitar!

Strap on, tune up, rock out!