#1
Hello. My friend and I use a starter amp -- the Ibanez ACA15 to be exact -- in our band practice sessions. In the middle of one of these practice sessions, the amp fell from a box that is about a foot high and now it no longer turns on. We have very little knowledge with guitar amps/electronics, so we don't really know what went wrong. We were debating looking at the inside of it, but we're afraid that may do some unwanted damage. The only guess we have is that the connection on the inside became loose. Does anyone with more experience have any idea what the issue could be and what could be done to fix it? Thank you.
#2
It is anybody's guess but see that the back where the power cable goes into the amp didn't warp or break off. My other guess would be that the PCB board maybe got disconnected or the knobs in the front got knocked in thus breaking the PCB board with the electronics but it is anybody's guess until you open it up.
Since this amp is not worth taking to repair person, you could try some DYI and open it up to see if something oblivious didn't get disconnected. Careful around the power section and work on it when it is disconnected.
#3
As a non-electrician dude, I have to ask: is an amp's "power section" clearly marked so that even newbies can ID it?
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#4
^ probably not
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#5
Try reseating the fuse? Maybe there is an external fuse holder by the power cable?
Guitars:
Jackson Kelly KE3 - MIJ (Distortion/Jazz)
Jackson DKMGT Dinky (EMG 81/85)
ESP E-II Eclipse Custom (JB/'59)
ESP LTD EC-1001FR (EMG 81/60)
Fender MIM Strat

Amps:
Mesa/Boogie Dual Rectifier Roadster 212
Laney IronHeart IRT-Studio
Peavey Vypyr 30
Peavey ReValver Amp Sims
TOOOO many T.C. Electronic Pedals. . .
#6
Quote by dannyalcatraz
As a non-electrician dude, I have to ask: is an amp's "power section" clearly marked so that even newbies can ID it?
just dont leave it plugged in while you take it apart, you should be fine. Does the light come on?, because the input jack would be the most vulnerable part in a crash. Then the knobs. Often they break at the solder point and are wiggley to the touch. The fuse could have blown too due to the shock(not electric) it would be good to test the speaker too, for some reason.
#8
Quote by 1sicparvismag
In the middle of one of these practice sessions, the amp fell from a box that is about a foot high and now it no longer turns on. We have very little knowledge with guitar amps/electronics, so we don't really know what went wrong.


Well, you DROPPED IT, you bloody sod.
Broke the thing proper, you did.
Somewhat obvious, I should think.

Evidently a baby was dropped on its head at least a foot at birth about...how many years old did you say you were?


Okay, that was fun.
#9
Quote by dannyalcatraz
As a non-electrician dude, I have to ask: is an amp's "power section" clearly marked so that even newbies can ID it?


Well, for starters, it's the broken part.
Look for something that's broken off and missing.
Like what? I dunno, one of those bumpy bits with the wires hanging out.
How will you know it's not there? Will it'll be missing, won't it? Or hiding in a corner or stuck to the back of the speaker or sneaking around inside the voice coil or laying across another bit causing a short. Or there'll be a great huge crack in the solder somewhere. Okay, so it could be a one RCH crack, in which case you'd only be able to see it with magnetic resonance imaging, but everyone has one of those in their basement, no? And if it's a one RCH *near* a crack, you've gone happily off track and we'll see you again in about 15 minutes, eh?
Last edited by dspellman at Dec 23, 2016,
#10
Check the power cord, check the fuse, find a friend with "some" electronics experience and let him open it up and look around. Maybe just a loose connection or damaged fuse. Maybe fate rescued you from marginal guitar tone and is gently nudging you to upgrade your amp.
"Your sound is in your hands as much as anything. It's the way you pick, and the way you hold the guitar, more than it is the amp or the guitar you use." -- Stevie Ray Vaughan

"Anybody can play. The note is only 20 percent. The attitude of the motherfucker who plays it is 80 percent." -- Miles Davis

Guthrie on tone: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zmohdG9lLqY