#1
I've been using 11-gauge Ernies for a while (Beefy Slinky) but switched to Hybrid Slinky as I had difficulty with bends. I got my strings on around 12th September and they broke on a full step bend on the 1st string during a solo (Stairway To Heaven for the record) on 4th December. So I ordered another set but Super Slinky this time and I've been using them from 6th December to 22nd December until it broke on the same bend.

I don't think I bend too much, because I stop when hit the right note. I think I pick a bit harder than most people, but I don't think that is enough to break strings like this. What could be the reason? I don't think the problem is with the bridge or the nut because the string breaks somewhere in the middle, near where I pick.

P.S. Around a year ago, I broke an 11 gauge Ernie Ball 1st string on this same bend, because of which I ditched the solo, but those strings were really rusted.
#2
What tuning are you using? What scale is your instrument? It's quite possible the string tension is too high, causing the strings to wear off and break faster. I play 11-gauge strings on my 25,5" guitar, which is tuned to Eb. I immagine if you're playing 11-gauge strings on standard E-tuning on a similar scale, that might be your problem.
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Quote by metalmingee
In fact, wanting different tunings is one of the best reasons to convince others that you need more guitars.
#3
If you've got body chemistry that rusts your strings quickly, or if you're leaving your guitar out on a stand, you may have to change strings more often. If either of those is the case, I'd suggest wiping down the strings with a CLEAN rag (not the same one that gathers sweat each time) and storing your guitar in the case with a VCI. A VCI emitter is a vapor corrosion inhibitor that will run you under $10 and will last about a year at a time. NASA uses these things to store parts, and I've used them for years with guitars that I use seldom, including some really expensive vintage pieces.

If you're breaking your strings at the point of pick attack, you should look at your pick technique (and your pick). You're playing an electric guitar; let the pickups do more of the work. You'll still get the dynamics. You may find that you want to switch to a heavier pick (this sounds counter intuitive, I know) if you're using one now that's pretty flexible. I switched to a Gravity Pick Razer 2 (caution: they're around $6 each!) and found that I could get louder with less effort. They also have a $20 pick made of a different material that's supposed to be even louder, but I had a hard enough time talking myself into trying a six buck pick. $20 is going to be a much longer conversation, I think.

If you're breaking your strings at the bridge, of course, there's a decent chance you've developed a burr in the saddle (not the same thing as with horses) that's cutting your string over time.
#4
In addition to dspellman's post, you could also have one on the post of your tuners. That's if the string breaks behind the nut. And it's rarer, but I have seen the nuts cause breakage too.
#6
Also, even if it isn't the nut, lubing it will help the strings slide through and hold tune. While you have your strings off, take a basic number 2 pencils and rub the lead in the slots. Works wonders and is cheap as chips. Plus you get a free pencil with the lube!
#7
As stated in the orginal post, the string breaks near where I pick, every time.

I have a 25.5" scale guitar (http://www.ibanez.com/products/eg_detail.php?year=2016&area_id=3&cat_id=1&series_id=1&data_id=285&color=CL01) and I play on standard tuning, but the 11 gauges have been the most durable so far. Surely a standard set of 9 gauges are perfect for standard tuning on this scale?

Thanks for the pencil tip will definitely try out.

Another thing that can be going wrong is that I leave too much slack before bending the string at the tuner while changing? If the strings are too long between the bridge and the nut, they could be under a lot of tension...

How much am I supposed to leave?
#8
1)You shouldn't be breaking strings regularly - i would suggest paying for a professional setup.

2) some guitars don't handle larger gauges well - i would suggest dropping down to 10's - you don't get much tone benefit from the bigger gauges and they can actually sound worse on certain guitars.
#9
Quote by reverb66

2) some guitars don't handle larger gauges well - i would suggest dropping down to 10's - you don't get much tone benefit from the bigger gauges and they can actually sound worse on certain guitars.


This is true. I love heavy strings. 12 and 13s on my l.p. in standard. But on my 7 string at 26.5" scale length while 9s feel fine the low string I can't really go above 62 without losing its chunk or being difficult to play.
#10
josonmj Yep, you DEFINITELY should take a lower string gauge. For 25,5" and standard tuning, 9 gauge strings are considererd standard. I too prefer to play higher gauge strings, which is why I have 10 gauge on my 7 string (standard tuning) and 11 gauge on my 6-string (Eb tuning), but 11 for standard tuning sounds insane. I can't even immagine the finger pain. When I don't play gutiar for 1 or 2 weeks I already notice how my fingertips get softer and then it hurts like hell when I start again.
Ibanez S570DXQM-BBB
DiMarzio Evolution HSH
Ibanez RG927WBBZ-TGF
DiMarzio Evolution 7 & DiMarzio LiquiFire 7
Peavey Valve King 112, Peavey Vypyr 15
Harley Benton NG-100, Ibanez Weeping Demon

Quote by metalmingee
In fact, wanting different tunings is one of the best reasons to convince others that you need more guitars.