#1
Taylor 210e Deluxe : Top = Solid Sitka Spruce , Back&Side = Layered Rosewood

Fender Paramount Deluxe : Top = Solid Sitka Spruce Top , Back&Side = Solid East Indian Rosewood
#3
Quote by Tony Done
Based on Fenders history re acoustics, and the way Taylor guitars are built, Fender wouldn't get a look in with me. I've got nothing against laminated b&s in a well-designed guitar.


in this case, you guy suggested me to Taylor 210e DLX right ?
#5
11suppakit

I think it runs like this: A "210 Deluxe" is a "210" with extra bling and a hard shell case. I'm not terribly sure, but a "210" might be a "110" with a shiny finish.

You really need to read the list of features fine print, as those "Mexi-Taylors" share woods and features.

If you want / have to have solid wood, (rosewood), B & S in a Taylor, you would need to bump to the American built guitars, 400 series minimum. https://www.taylorguitars.com/guitars/acoustic/features/series/400*-

Tony Done

I searched the "Paramount" series, and it's new. So, not that much is on the street about about this new product. And considering, as you pointed out with respect to their reputation, an upscale Fender acoustic line is going to have a bit of trouble gaining traction.

http://www.guitarplayer.com/frets/1422/review-fender-paramount-deluxe-series-acoustics/59026

11suppakit

Considering the Fender "Paramounts" are Asia built, it's sort of unfair for me to compare them with Taylor 400's on price disparity alone.

What these new Fenders remind me of for direct comparison's sake, is the Epiphone "Masterbilt" series. These are Asia built, enjoy great reputations, and compare in price to the Fenders.

My reasoning is this, I have a Fender, "Sonoran", and (2) Epiphone EJ-200-SCE. The Epiphones are much superior to the Fender, and currently are in the same price range.

I know this is inductive reasoning but nonetheless, I would likely buy a Masterbilt before a Paramount, on track record and personal experience with the brand.

The "Mexi-Taylors" 1xx & 2xx) are very nice as well. I currently own a 150e 12 string, and it plays and sounds great. Since we're talking 6 string guitars, take that FWIW.

Here's a link to the Epiphone "Masterbilt" line: http://www.epiphone.com/News/Features/2016/The-Epiphone-Masterbilt-Series.aspx
Last edited by Captaincranky at Dec 23, 2016,
#6
I'll just note that I've played a fair few Taylors, and have mostly preferred the laminated Mexi 100 and 200 series to the more expensive solid ones. I've got no confidence in price as an indicator of performance. FWIW, I tried a 150e, the model that CC owns, good tone and easy to play compered to many older style 12 strings. I used to own a Gibson 25-12, it was clearly designed to be played by an orangutan.
#9
Quote by Tony Done
Based on Fenders history re acoustics, and the way Taylor guitars are built, Fender wouldn't get a look in with me. I've got nothing against laminated b&s in a well-designed guitar.


yeah. i haven't tried the 2-series taylors but i tried one of those fenders recently and i really didn't much like it. it felt like all of the money had gone into the bling, felt a bit plasticky etc.

it didn't help that i tried a furch next to it, which was about the same price and absolutely annihilated it, but even so.
I'm an idiot and I accidentally clicked the "Remove all subscriptions" button. If it seems like I'm ignoring you, I'm not, I'm just no longer subscribed to the thread. If you quote me or do the @user thing at me, hopefully it'll notify me through my notifications and I'll get back to you.
Quote by K33nbl4d3
I'll have to put the Classic T models on my to-try list. Shame the finish options there are Anachronism Gold, Nuclear Waste and Aged Clown, because in principle the plaintop is right up my alley.

Quote by K33nbl4d3
Presumably because the CCF (Combined Corksniffing Forces) of MLP and Gibson forums would rise up against them, plunging the land into war.

Quote by T00DEEPBLUE
Et tu, br00tz?
#11
Street price of the Taylor 210 and the Martin DRS2 is similar, and their specs are also similar. I prefer the Taylor on constructional grounds (bolt-on, shim-adjustable neck), and I wouldn't buy a Martin by mail order unless there was an easy return policy. I would say the value-for-money is about the same in the two, and in line with the rest of their respective models.
#12
Tony Done

Taylor 210e DLX -- Spruce (Solid) + RoseWood (Laminate)
Martin DRS2 -- Spruce (Solid) +Sapele (Solid)

why you said these two spec are similar?
#13
Yes, I don't put much weight on the difference between solid and laminate. As I mentioned earlier, I have generally preferred the Taylors with laminated b&s to the solid models. A closer comparison might be the Taylor 110 with the Martin
Last edited by Tony Done at Dec 25, 2016,
#15
Hmm. Couple of things.

I wouldn't trust differences I hear in a recording, there are too many variables that have nothing to do with the guitar.
The difference in tone between two specific guitars may be happenstance and simply due to random variation.
Any suggestion that it is down to "finish" in two guitars as similar as this raises a big red bs flag for me.

However, what you are certainly getting in the DLX is all gloss and a decent hardshell case. Are they worth the extra cost to you?
#16
I thought the 214 sounded better, more open. But the 214 dlx had a touch more bass, but was also a touch muddier. That could be easily explained away via small differences in individual guitars, rather than the model uptick. My 2 EJ-200 SCE's don't sound the same, and the only difference there is, one is natural, the other is, "Vintage Sunset Burst". That's just the stain though, they both are gloss poly.. Keep in mind, each one has its own charm. But in this case, Taylor is making you pay for the all gloss finish as you step up to the Deluxe).

In all honesty, most of the extra money is going into Taylor's hard shell case. Not that I don't think that's a valuable option. It's a big plus if you travel with your guitar, and also if you need to humidify your guitar, a bag doesn't quite cut it for that...

Speaking for myself, I had an aftermarket dreadnought case which I now put my 150e in, and moved the Fender "Sonoran" to the Taylor's bag.
Last edited by Captaincranky at Dec 25, 2016,
#17
Captaincranky

I have less good cases than I do guitars, so I shuffle them round for transport purposes. I like the idea of a Sonoran in a Taylor bag though. Sort of sheep in wolf's clothing. Just kidding, any guitar that works for the player is a good guitar, regardless of name or price.
#18
Quote by Tony Done
Captaincranky

I have less good cases than I do guitars, so I shuffle them round for transport purposes. I like the idea of a Sonoran in a Taylor bag though. Sort of sheep in wolf's clothing. Just kidding, any guitar that works for the player is a good guitar, regardless of name or price.
No offense taken. I don't find guitars, they find me, since I never know when any given maker is going to condescend to introducing a, "limited edition left handed model". This is particularly true of Asian makers. That's the reason I have my 150e. Taylor shipped a run of the LH models to Sweetwater, while they were running a "10% off for father's day sale". Nobody else had the lefty issue at that time.

The "Sonoran", I have because Musician's Friend was running NOS at old stock prices, at the same time they were running true new stock at it's new inflated price. So, I think I paid about $330.00 for it, (USD, of course). MAP now, is about $450.00.

Taylor is one of the best with left handed availability. I could get all the left handed Taylors I couldn't possibly afford, just a phone call away.

In any event, the LH Epi EJ-200-SCE are long gone from the market, which is why I bought two of them in anticipation of Epiphone being true to its word that they were, "a limited edition".

The Fender is decent sounding, but I've had a bit of trouble with the sound board warping. The saddle is low, so I string it with .011 to .052's to, (hopefully), prevent further rise.

FWIW, the Epiphones gave me so much more for my money. Bound necks, gold hardware, stereo electronics, I could go on. Plus, they seem much sturdier!
Last edited by Captaincranky at Dec 25, 2016,
#19
Quote by Captaincranky



The Fender is decent sounding, but I've had a bit of trouble with the sound board warping. The saddle is low, so I string it with .011 to .052's to, (hopefully), prevent further rise.


I've used a flying brace, like the JLD Bridge doctor in function, to stop the top lifting any further on my old L-00. I don't have a pic of the brace itself, but this is the modified brass pin that holds it in place:



So far it is working well. It is very lightly built compared to a Bridge Doctor, and hasn't affected to tone very much. The stick that runs from the bridge to the endblock is a piece of thin wall aluminium tube from the model maker's shop, much lighter and springier than the cheap wood dowel they use in the Bridge Doctor. I've installed them in other guitars, and sometimes they affect the tone, but I prefer the tighter sound that can result.
#20
Tony Donesennosen,
In this case Fender pm1 dlx, Epi aj45 that 214 dlx, even a good git from Epi Texan 64 before 210/214 dlx, + some Cash in your pocket for bag .
And gd 93 nat from Takamine is better proposition.
I' go for 2: Texan+ gd 93nat instead od 210.
Same money, lots of fun.
#21
sennosen 

A lot of my argument in favour of Taylors has to do with their construction - they have a fully bolt-on, shim-adjustable. This means that if the action goes bad they are easily and cheaply adjusted, unlike the other you mention. In those the repair might not be cost effective, even if feasible. This makes the difference, IMO, between heirloom quality, and use once and throw away. - Something I personally care about.
#22
Tony Donesennosen,
I respect your opinion , and Beeing a hugh fan of taylors feel bad about what I said, still, I ' d stick to mine and would buy Texan and gd93 instead of 210/214. Gd is well made, playable and sturdy beast.