#1
Friend offered me a practically new one for $150 and I've been in need of a decent jazz guitar. 150 is pretty much nothing but if this guitar is just going to sit in the corner because there are better ones for jazz out there I'd rather just have the 150 go towards something else.
#2
May as well add this. I have another offer for a Sheraton Pro II 1992 for $350. My only issue is that it is a bit more used.. The Dot is pretty much new, it's been played like twice.
#4
Dot's are decent guitars. They're not amazing, but for 150, it's a really nice price if you're looking for something like it.
The older Sheratons are a lot nicer both in looks and quality in my opinion, at least the ones I've played.
If you're looking for something in the long term, I'd shell out the extra. If this is more a thing of looking if you like semi-hollows and aren't sure you'll play it a lot, I'd get the Dot.
#5
I've been to five jazz clubs in the last couple of months, and the guitar players are playing EVERYTHING. Strats, Les Pauls, big hollowbodies, thin hollowbodies. There is no "jazz guitar" any more. A jazz guitar is whatever guitar the jazz player is using.

This is Jim Soloway playing a Single 15 Swan (27" scale version of his 15" body width single cutaway). These guitars are "sort of" hollowbody in that the back is carved from a single chunk of wood and then mated to a flat top (in this case redwood).

#6
What dspellman said, you can play jazz on just about anything.

Listen to Julian Lage kill it on a tele:

My God, it's full of stars!
#8
Dreadnought I see what you mean. Thing is all of my axes are pretty much setup to play metal I don't really have any good for a clean tone. My epi SG would prob be the closest.
#9
I actually sold a brand new Dot and bought Sheraton ii(mik) used which i like alot better but that's just me,You may like the Dot.You should try the Dot out and decide if you like it.
Sounds like good deal although I don't know much about US prices.If you like the feel then you could get it and get some new pickups in whenever.

Edited to add:With guitars brand new does not = better.Some used guitars feel and play much better than brand new ones.
Last edited by EyeballPaul at Dec 24, 2016,
#10
Quote by dspellman
I've been to five jazz clubs in the last couple of months, and the guitar players are playing EVERYTHING. Strats, Les Pauls, big hollowbodies, thin hollowbodies. There is no "jazz guitar" any more. A jazz guitar is whatever guitar the jazz player is using.

This is Jim Soloway playing a Single 15 Swan (27" scale version of his 15" body width single cutaway). These guitars are "sort of" hollowbody in that the back is carved from a single chunk of wood and then mated to a flat top (in this case redwood).

This is true.I'm learning jazz now and i use my LP and SG and Tele depending how i'm feeling.One online jazz guitar teacher i use sometimes gets a really good jazz tone out of a Strat.
#11
EyeballPaul Another axe I have here is a PRS custom 24 with P90 pups. Jazz sound seems easy to get out so I'll prob try it out. If I can just use one of the guitars I have for jazz already, I'd rather not spend money to have a guitar lying around.
#13
Both the Dot and Sheraton work just fine for Jazz so play em both and decide. I generally use a Tele or 335 knockoff but even a striped pointy guitar with EMGs can work. Roll off the volume and tone until you get that smooth groove. Bingo!
"Your sound is in your hands as much as anything. It's the way you pick, and the way you hold the guitar, more than it is the amp or the guitar you use." -- Stevie Ray Vaughan

"Anybody can play. The note is only 20 percent. The attitude of the motherfucker who plays it is 80 percent." -- Miles Davis

Guthrie on tone: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zmohdG9lLqY
#14
considering who developed the "Les Paul" it is a great jazzer..I use it for just about any style..Rock Fusion Country (what ever that is today) blues and of course jazz...mated with a Fender twin it can do no wrong..
play well

wolf
#15
Ahh, I love this site everyone is so helpful. I think I'll use my PRS then although hollowbodies do look pretty nice
#16
daddyorca

Good idea. Separate form from function. Archtops evolved originally as acoustics that had great cutting power without amplification in a band situation. That is no longer necessary, though the "form" remains. From what I have gathered, even top pro jazz players with very expensive acoustic archtops treat them as hollow electrics rather than amplified acoustics.
Last edited by Tony Done at Dec 24, 2016,
#17
Tony Done Ahh I see, thanks for the info! I have always loved the look of hollows myself but it didn't seem like it's very necessary for me at the moment. Still, if I find a nice hollowbody for a good price I'd pick it up
#19
I might pick up a Dot for $150 regardless of utility, it's just a good deal. Spend another $200 on pickups and you'll have a pretty nice guitar.

and I agree with the majority opinion - the jazz sound is in your fingers much more than your guitar. Unless you're going for THE traditional jazz guitar sound of the 40s and 50s, there's no need to get a hollowbody. John McLaughlin was rocking solid body guitars back in the 60s, Bill Frisell has a signature Tele model, and anything on the fusion end will benefit from a solid body.
#21
Quote by daddyorca
EyeballPaul Another axe I have here is a PRS custom 24 with P90 pups. Jazz sound seems easy to get out so I'll prob try it out. If I can just use one of the guitars I have for jazz already, I'd rather not spend money to have a guitar lying around.
I'm jealous