#1
It's only a new cheapie electro acoustic guitar that I just got for Xmas. It's surprisingly good too but the 2nd string has the tiniest buzz which I tracked down to being the result of the slot in the nut being very very slightly too deep. The string is tingling on the first fret. To test it I put a really tiny splinter of matchstick, thinner than a 9 gauge top E string, in the slot and it did the trick.
I don't know whether to return it, leave the matchstick splinter in it or try and sort the nut some other way. All other respects the guitar is extremely good such as intonation and string height (needed fettling though) especially as it is a cheap one.
If I return it and have another it could be worse.
When the blue light flashes I am kidding.
#2
Here's how I fix a slightly deep slot. This method has been adopted by my repairer mate at the music store.

1) Clean the bottom of the slot.
2) Lay a couple of threads of white cotton neatly in the bottom of the slot, just enough to cover it.
3) Secure them taut and straight with tape on the fretboard and headstock.
4) Very carefully drop superglue into the slot off a toothpick so that it just enough to wick into the thread without flooding into the slot itself. The wicked glue should show in the thread on each side of the slot for about 1/8"
5) Trim off the excess thread flush with each side of the nut with a sharp knife when dry.

With luck, that's it, no further work or specialised tools necessary.

I have had some repaired like this for more than 10 years.
#3
Quote by Tony Done
Here's how I fix a slightly deep slot. This method has been adopted by my repairer mate at the music store.

1) Clean the bottom of the slot.
2) Lay a couple of threads of white cotton neatly in the bottom of the slot, just enough to cover it.
3) Secure them taut and straight with tape on the fretboard and headstock.
4) Very carefully drop superglue into the slot off a toothpick so that it just enough to wick into the thread without flooding into the slot itself. The wicked glue should show in the thread on each side of the slot for about 1/8"
5) Trim off the excess thread flush with each side of the nut with a sharp knife when dry.

With luck, that's it, no further work or specialised tools necessary.

I have had some repaired like this for more than 10 years.

Many thanks. That's brilliant.
I was wondering what to use to get into the gap as it is so fine.
It really does only a hair's thickness.
So it's better to fix it than to send the guitar back!
When the blue light flashes I am kidding.
#4
The advantage of this method over the popular "baking soda and superglue" method, which I have also used for bigger repairs, is that you don't need specialised tools to recut the slot.

I wouldn't send the guitar back for a problem as small as that, but I'm fairly handy at fixing small stuff.
#5
Quote by Tony Done


I wouldn't send the guitar back for a problem as small as that, but I'm fairly handy at fixing small stuff.


I feel the same especially as it is fine in all other aspects...................considering the low cost. And I do believe a replacement could have any number of faults
Would it be possible to tape the end of the cotton to the headstock and then pull it in the direction away from the bridge for about 5mm, then put superglue on the cotton ( via a toothpick) and then pull it back and tight into place and tape it to the fretboard?.
When the blue light flashes I am kidding.
#6
I've never tried that, but it sounds risky, because superglue tends to flow into places where you don't want it. You can try it and report back.

Just one additional thought, when you tape the thread down, keep it close enough the the nut, say 1"or so, so that the thread is seat firmly into the full length of the slot.
#7
Quote by Tony Done
when you tape the thread down, keep it close enough the the nut, say 1"or so, so that the thread is seat firmly into the full length of the slot.

Will do.
Job done! Just like I decided by pulling the thread through with glue on it.
I also put a 3mm approx strip of sellotape over the nut once the dry thread was placed to stop the cotton coming out of the slot (whispy stuff this cotton).
I tried a dry run on a piece of card to see how the glue would flow and see the setting time.
As it happens I was able to wet the cotton with superglue using a toothpick and pull it through the slot till taught. Then I taped it down on the fingerboard. I knew it was the full length of the slot when I came to trim the ends!
When the blue light flashes I am kidding.
#9
Quote by Tony Done
I pleased it worked. Very easy, eh?
Quote by Tony Done
I pleased it worked. Very easy, eh?


Yeah very though nerve racking as I didn't want glue all over the shop.
Again thanks.
Next task is to fit a scratch plate if it's a keeper.

http://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/PVC-Adhesive-Pickguard-Scratch-Plate-fit-Most-Guitar-Black-Cool-Skull-Pattern/361680411527?_trksid=p2047675.c100005.m1851&_trkparms=aid%3D222007%26algo%3DSIC.MBE%26ao%3D2%26asc%3D38661%26meid%3Df28b4bb09f454560a6bc07a524a0b7c7%26pid%3D100005%26rk%3D4%26rkt%3D6%26sd%3D281939867718
When the blue light flashes I am kidding.
#11
Quote by Tony Done
I'm generous with the masking tape when using superglue.

It's a wise precaution. I used sellotape cos it's the middle of the night and the sellotape was handy.
When the blue light flashes I am kidding.