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#1
I'm considering buying a high gain amplifier. I would like one that is big enough for playing through with a garage band, big enough to play out with would be another plus, and if it's also good in the bedroom (if you know what I mean?), that would also be good. So, kind of an all purpose high gain guitar amp. I want to stay under $800.

As for loud enough to gig with, I tend to hear people say it "loud enough to play with a drummer," but in my experience, the drummer isn't as big a problem here as your other string players. For example, if you have another guitar player, odds are the other guitarist uses a 40 watt combo, like a Hot Rod Deluxe, or a Randall RD40c, Blackstar HTC40c, a Marshall DSL40c, or something like that. So, even if you have something really expensive and stylish, but smaller, like an AC30, then you aren't going to be heard, unless the other guitarist is polite enough to turn down for you. And, of course, if that happens, then the other guitarist may not get quite the sound wanted. So, the closer to 40 watts, the better.

Here are the choices by manufacturer:

Blackstar HTC40c HT
1. CON: Digital reverb
2. Pro: Cheap!
3. CON: High gain is a feature on this model, it can achieve it, but the amp doesn't seem specifically voiced for high gain applications in the way Blackstar's Metal series was. Bummer.
Blackstar HTV112 HT
1. Pro: 80w speaker cab for cheap.
2. Con: high watt (80w) speaker may give you too much headroom with a 40-ish watt amp. And you aren't looking for headroom if you want high gain.
Laney IRT30-112
Pro: Major pro for me with this one. You can dial the wattage from 1 to 30, meaning it's a bedroom amp with pretty good possibilities elsewhere.
Con: Digital reverb. Why?
Pro: Slight pro. This UK amp uses American style tubes. I prefers me some American style amp tubes.
Peavey 6505MH & Peavey 112-6 cabinet
Pro: Major pro for me is that you can adjust this for play at 1, 5, or 20 watts.
Con: Just barely loud enough, or not quite loud enough, at 20 watts.
Con: This American amp uses British style tubes. Acceptable, but not my preference, govnor.
Peavey 6505+ 112 Combo
Pro: At 60 watts, it's loud as hell. Louder than hell, even.
Con: You aren't going to like moving this thing around if you ever have to.
Con: footswitch options are kind of underwhelming.
Con: Maybe too loud if you are playing with others who have 40-ish watt amps.
Randall RD40c
Nearly perfect accept for one thing:
Con: It kindasucks in the bedroom. You can't lower the wattage below 40 with this one.
Randall RD45c
Con: Not fun in the bedroom
Pro: 2-12" speakers. Stereo!
Con: Heavier than a mug.
Randall RD45H
Con: If you combined this head with a 1x12" cab (like the aforementioned Blackstar cab or match it with a Randall 1x12), it would be a little over my $800 limit, even if not by much.
Pro: If you combine it with a 1x12 cab, then you have a 45 watt half stack, and it would be easy to transport. Worth considering.
Con: Not what you are looking for in the bedroom.

Any thoughts about, or experience with any of these?

Thanks.
Last edited by afdgdfa at Dec 27, 2016,
#2
I'd go for the 6505+ combo. Replace the speaker with a V30 and buy a trolley/dolly/handcart to move it around with.
Gilchrist custom
Yamaha SBG500
Telecasters
Randall RM100 & RM20
Marshall JTM45 clone
Marshall JCM900 4102 (modded)
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Fender 5F1 Champ clone
Atomic Amplifire
Marshall 1960A
Boss GT-100


Cathbard Amplification
My band
#3
Some other lower cost options to consider:
- Jet City
- Carvin
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#4
Used peavey triple x . There are 40,60 and 120 watt models . Some with 1x12 others with 2x12 . I see them on eBay and Craigslist from time to time . I've also seen half stacks go locally for as low as $400. I have a 1x12 version that I got locally for $150. It had some issues with the reverb but it was fixed easily . I believe a tube came loose or maybe the reverb tank cable wasn't fully plugged in . Because the reverb started working again after I inspected the amp , all I noticed was a loose tube , pushed it in and all was fine . Good amp if you'll mostly play metal or aggressive rock

The peavey 6505 mini seems like the best option to me . The head is small and light . The wattage switch is cool, plus it has reverb and you can try it on different cabs . But I have heard it's a bit muddy , and the lows on it aren't as good as the bigger one . But what do I know ! I haven't tried it
#5
afdgdfa It is good to see someone who has done some research beforehand rather than just asking "need br00tz amp help?"

What kind of high-gain sounds are you talking? The 6505 112 is probably the most common amp suggest for metal, but there are better options if all you need is hard rock.

Just to clear some things up, if it helps: If the other guitarist is overpowering the rest of band, then HE needs to turn down, you do not have to meet him at his level. Most modern guitar amps have master volumes, and although they could be considered to have a some drawbacks, they DO allow you cleanly reduce the volume of your amp while still keeping your desired preamp distortion. The drummer generally sets the volume for the band, presuming you are not running your equipment mic'd to PA.

I am not sure what you mean by "American Style" and "British Style" tubes. There are power tubes that are typical to go in American-voiced amps (6L6 for Fender), and power tubes that typically go in British-voiced amps (EL34 for Marshall, EL84 for VOX), but that does not mean they are American and British style tubes. They are just what tubes are typically used. Also, tubes have different names to correspond with the region of manufacture. For instance, EL84 is the "British" term, but they were called 6BQ5's by America. However, you can sometimes guess the voicing of an amp by examining the power tubes, since certain power tubes often go with certain amps. Again, if you see 6L6's it is likely an American voicing, EL34's a British voicing. But that is not always the case.

Lastly, invest in a mover's dolly cart to assist you in moving your amps, and save your back.
Last edited by Will Lane at Dec 27, 2016,
#6
Re: Jet City and Carvin. Thanks! I'll take a look at those, too.

I'm surprised nobody liked the Randall options yet. Actually, the Randall RD112 cabinet comes with a Celestion V30. And I dig the RD40 combo. It's one of my favorites on the list I made above.

Another favorite of mine is the Laney. I could just get an analog reverb pedal, and try to put out of mind the fact that my amp has a digital effect on it. It goes from 1 to 30 watts. That's kind of like if the volume goes to 11. Total win.

Re: the type of music I'm thinking of. Well, actually I play 2 instruments mainly. Violin and guitar. I have other guitars and amps for other kinds of music. I want something high gain for stuff like Vektor and Tyr. Who are pretty different. But that's what I have in mind this time around. Modern metal. I have an SG Standard with 57s in it. Considering a ESP Horizon, but might just stick with the SG. But that's kind of what I'd be doing with a high gain amp.

Re: US/UK tube styles. That's a refreshing view on tubes to me. But I think you got what I was saying. UK amps tend to have one style and US amps tend to have another. I slightly prefer the 6l6 style.

Re: hand carts. I mean, I could get a hand cart. You are right.

RERERERERErereRE: Randall. Nobody likes the 45w head with a V30 1x12" cab, option? How come?
Last edited by afdgdfa at Dec 27, 2016,
#7
Quote by afdgdfa
I could just get an analog reverb pedal, and try to put out of mind the fact that my amp has a digital effect on it. It goes from 1 to 30 watts. That's kind of like if the volume goes to 11.
99% of reverb pedals are, for the most part, digital. The reason why is because spring reverb tanks, plates, and church cathedrals + some mics are impossible to fit in a pedal enclosure. There are a few spring reverb pedals but they are pretty big, and some BBD reverb pedals. But for the most part, your standard reverb pedal will use digital signal processing.

The Randall stuff is for the most part fine, it is just that the 6505 is the tried and true common suggestion. Are you able to try any of these amps out?
Last edited by Will Lane at Dec 27, 2016,
#8
although Will touched on a couple of things you seem to be a bit confused on a couple of things. the tube thing has been covered but the speaker thing hasn't. an 80 watt speaker in a 40 watt amp just means you won't likely be able to blow up the speaker. headroom is important in a high gain amp as higher headroom means you are better able to control the gain ( generated in the preamp stage) at louder volumes. a 60 watt amp isn't really much louder than a 40 watter so don't worry about that.

what type of high gain tones are you after. this would help for advising on an amp.
#9
Will Lane

Okay. Yeah. Digital reverb, or any digital effect on an amp, is pretty hard to get passed, for me. And I have no experience with pedal reverb, honestly. That would be one more thing I would have to research.

So, we're down to Peavey, which I have some experience with, and Randall. I do need to go compare them. I have no problem with trying something new, but I do appreciate "tried and true," also. One of the Peavys I have experience with is the 6505+ 112 combo. I like it, but I'm not set on it. I'm considering others.

Thanks for helping me think this through.
Last edited by afdgdfa at Dec 27, 2016,
#10
monwobobbo

The way I understand it, or understood it, having a speaker pretty much matched in wattage to an amp is the ideal. I heard you want to match them as closely as possible in most cases. If you have a speaker that can handle way more watts than what your amp puts out, it would mean more head room. That's what Ive heard. And having a speaker not able to handle as many watts as your amp can put out could mean you don't get clean sounds, and it could mean blowing your speaker if you aren't careful.

So, that's not the proper understanding?

Oh. The sound I want is modern metal. Like extreme metal. Thrash-y.
Last edited by afdgdfa at Dec 27, 2016,
#11
afdgdfa Having more wattage handling on the speaker end of things, compared to what the amp puts out, just means the speaker itself has more handling available but not that it will put out more volume or necessarily react cleaner. For example, a 40w amp into a 60w speaker, the speaker has 20w of "headroom" left before the voice coil will start to burn up. But the amp is still ONLY putting out the 40w into speaker, nothing more. It is just that the speaker can handle 20w more power, but is only seeing 40w.

Having less wattage on the speaker compared to the amp (40w amp into a 20w speaker) just means that you will end up with a broken speaker fairly quickly. The amp is putting out more power than the speaker can safely handle, so it will likely break, especially if you are diming the amplifier.

Having a bit more wattage rating from the speaker is smart in case the amp's wattage rating was conservative (says 30w but puts out 40w) or the speakers rating was liberal (says 20w but can only handle 15w). However, the closer you do get to an amp's wattage rating by the speaker (say 40w amp, 40w speaker), can mean that the speaker is pushed to its limits but that it never really breaks- possibly causing the cone to distort a bit but for the voice coil to never really burn up. That is a dangerous game, but it is seen in amps like the AC30.
Last edited by Will Lane at Dec 27, 2016,
#12
Will Lane

Okay, okay. I think I follow you. If I'm right, then let's say we link one 45 watt head to a 60 watt speaker cab, and another 45 watt head to an 80 watt speaker cab. Are you saying the 80 watt speaker's sound wouldn't be any more or less likely to break up than that of the 60 watt speaker?

Back to the amp question though.

If you had to pick one combination of these, would you rather match the 80 watt Blackstar cabinet to the 45 watt Randall head (RD45h)? Or would you prefer the 60 watt V30 Randall cab as a match for that 45 watt head? I don't think either are really voiced to match that particular head. I believe it's voiced for a 2x12 cab. But it would work either way.
Last edited by afdgdfa at Dec 27, 2016,
#13
afdgdfa Yes. With the 45w head, the 60w cab has 15w left before it starts burning, the 80w cab has 35w. That is talking about Voice Coil Failure. The wattage rating refers to how much energy the voice coil can take. However there are other ways for speaker "failure".

You mention speaker "break-up", which is moreso where the speaker cone itself starts to distort in ways not analogus to the signal being applied to it (aside from frequency response, resonance, and attack). This break-up form of distortion is due to the construction and quality of the cone. Quality guitar speakers have fairly rigid cones do not break up in this way as easily as if you were pushing a cheap PA/hi-fi speaker, but it can happen. I mention this because a 60w speaker may sound more or less "broken-up" in comparison to an 80w speaker, and any other speaker as well, because of the cone quality- which is not necessarily due to its power handling capabilities. Typically, though, it is not something you really worry about.
--
The Blackstar cab has a "Celestion Speaker" in it which tells me it is a cheap custom voiced speaker- not worth your money. The Vintage 30 is a standard for guitar speakers and is worth your money.
Last edited by Will Lane at Dec 27, 2016,
#15
overloading a speaker can result in the speaker blowing and being no good not what you want. even if the speaker doesn't blow it will distort in a not good manor if pushed to hard and sound like garbage. you want the speaker to be able to handle more watts than the amp puts out.

what amp does your other guitar player have by the way? is it tube or solid state?
#16
More options:

Traynor YCV50B
Orange Dark Terror (15 watts might be light, but maybe not, no fx loop AFAIK)
EVH 5150 III - no clean channel, clean and crunch share same eq
Marshall DSL40C

Used: Peavey JSX, XXX, Marshall DSL heads or combos

OP - out of the amps Laney, but go with the IRT60H and a 2x12.

Sound dispersal is also important, if you have 2x12 going through a smaller amp it will be louder than a louder amp through only 1x12...all relative of course.
#17
Out of the ones you mentioned, the IRT is an excellent choice. From my understanding it is not altogether dissimilar in sound (on the dirty channel) from the Peavey 6505+, albeit perhaps a bit smoother.

As mentioned, the Peavey 6505+ is tried and true, though I PERSONALLY have grown tired of that sound. Still a great amp, and great for metal.

The Randall is a bit of an unknown entity to me. I have heard some really great things, but I haven't been able to play one of the bigger ones in person. I played the baby RD, and it was a sweet amp given the size. If the larger ones follow suit then they are probably awesome.

Something to mention here: speaker choice is going to make a big difference in sound quality. a V30 is an excellent choice, but there are others as well. The important thing here is to remember that some of the amps you mentioned (the 6505+ combo, the HTV112 cab) have really lousy speakers, and that will affect your sound pretty greatly. Speaker choice is often overlooked, but a good speaker can make a huge difference. As an example, I have played certain amps through certain speakers and been completely grossed out by the sound, only to try them with a different speaker and thought they sounded excellent.
I'm just a kickin' and a gougin' in the mud and the blood and the beer.
#18
^ Yeah. I'm actually a bit concerned- I'm sure some of the amps which I tried back in the day and though sucked maybe only had a crappy speaker in there. I remember a good while back (before i realised how much difference speakers made) trying a marshall dsl head through a cab (with g12t75s i think) and being kind of shocked at how good it sounded, because I think i'd only tried the combo before that.

Quote by monwobobbo
although Will touched on a couple of things you seem to be a bit confused on a couple of things. the tube thing has been covered but the speaker thing hasn't. an 80 watt speaker in a 40 watt amp just means you won't likely be able to blow up the speaker. headroom is important in a high gain amp as higher headroom means you are better able to control the gain ( generated in the preamp stage) at louder volumes. a 60 watt amp isn't really much louder than a 40 watter so don't worry about that.


yeah

plus it's a 70/80 which is a pretty mediocre (at best) speaker
Quote by afdgdfa
monwobobbo

The way I understand it, or understood it, having a speaker pretty much matched in wattage to an amp is the ideal. I heard you want to match them as closely as possible in most cases. If you have a speaker that can handle way more watts than what your amp puts out, it would mean more head room. That's what Ive heard. And having a speaker not able to handle as many watts as your amp can put out could mean you don't get clean sounds, and it could mean blowing your speaker if you aren't careful.

So, that's not the proper understanding?

Oh. The sound I want is modern metal. Like extreme metal. Thrash-y.


nah not really. you want the speaker to have at least as much wattage as the amp (and bear in mind that some companies are more conservative with their speaker ratings than others, plus tube amps put out more than their rated wattage when pushed), and if anything for metal you want tightness (usually) so more wattage in the speaker is probably better.
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Quote by K33nbl4d3
I'll have to put the Classic T models on my to-try list. Shame the finish options there are Anachronism Gold, Nuclear Waste and Aged Clown, because in principle the plaintop is right up my alley.

Quote by K33nbl4d3
Presumably because the CCF (Combined Corksniffing Forces) of MLP and Gibson forums would rise up against them, plunging the land into war.

Quote by T00DEEPBLUE
Et tu, br00tz?
Last edited by Dave_Mc at Dec 28, 2016,
#19
TS, I think you just need to get out and try some amps. It's great that you apparently did a lot of theoretical research but frankly a lot of it seems to be just that -- theoretical knowledge rather than hands-on experiences. Apologies if I'm mistaken. One example of such is your comments about several amps' cons such as "it sucks in the bedroom" or the idea that digital reverb is a "con," or finally a "60 watt amp maybe being too loud if your other guitar player is using a 40 watt amp." A lot of those ideas just don't apply in real life; or at the very least they are not hard-line rules.

Case in point, a long time ago I was told that a 6505 "needed to be cranked" to sound good. Considering that I live out in the country and can play as loud as I want, I went ahead and ordered a 6505+ 112 (60 watts) anyway. Well, it turned out that the whole "needs to be cranked to sound good" thing was utter bullshit. It sounds tits whether it's quiet or blowing me away while powering a 4 X 12 cab. Fact is, most of the amps you'll be considering have a master volume control and get their tone through the preamp while running the power amp quite clean. They don't need to be cranked to sound good, period.

Oddly enough, my Peavey Classic 30 head needs to be run louder than my 6505 to sound its best. So half the wattage -- but actually needs to be louder than my 60 watt amp to start sounding its best. Both are capable of peeling the paint off the walls. Hell, every tube amp I've ever tried was capable of getting insanely loud. But the higher wattage amps tend to sound better doing it -- not because they're louder, but because they can carry the low-end frequencies a lot better/more clearly. Anyway -- to summarize, you can't just look at wattage numbers and compare two amps by that, essentially. You really need to try them side by side to get any idea of how they compare. Wattage is really a poor indicator of how an amp will perform, as there are many other factors.

Finally, both my amps have real spring reverb. Both reverb units sound like ass. Both of my digital reverb pedals sound amazing. One of them even has a "spring" setting that to my ears sounds better than real spring reverb.

The point I'm trying to make is that you really need to just go spend some time with the amps you're considering -- you might be surprised.
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#20
^ Yeah. And not even the theoretical thing- heck a lot of my (so-called ) knowledge is theoretical- but kind of more like myths which seem to be perpetuated for some reason. For some reason the myths seem to gain traction while the correct info doesn't.

I mean, don't get me wrong, obviously doing a bunch of online research is a very good starting off point, and I do that too as well. But just be careful who you're listening to (including us)- there's a lot of BS out there.
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Quote by K33nbl4d3
I'll have to put the Classic T models on my to-try list. Shame the finish options there are Anachronism Gold, Nuclear Waste and Aged Clown, because in principle the plaintop is right up my alley.

Quote by K33nbl4d3
Presumably because the CCF (Combined Corksniffing Forces) of MLP and Gibson forums would rise up against them, plunging the land into war.

Quote by T00DEEPBLUE
Et tu, br00tz?
#21
Thanks to everyone who responded!

I think I found one more to add to the list. The Hughes and Kettner Tubemeister 36 head. It is normally matched with a 1x12" V30. So, you could nicely pair it with the Randall RD112V30 cab, if you find it less expensive than the Hughes and Kettner 1x12" cab. Which, I think you would.

The Tubemeister 36 is probably the most versatile I've mentioned. The only problem with it is that it has digital reverb. However, Hughes and Kettner, to my ear, did a pretty good job with it. And if you think about it, there are several others in its range with digital reverb. Meanwhile, the Randall RD45H has no reverb at all, which means I would probably end up doing a Holy Grail Neo, which as pointed out above, is digital also. To me, that "problem" is not a bad trade off, if you consider the shortcomings with the Tubemeister 36's competition.

I kind of agree with the guy who kindly responded above, when he said that while he likes the 6505+, he's also kind of tired of it. I'm the same way; I'm ready for something new.
Last edited by afdgdfa at Dec 28, 2016,
#22
The H&K is a hybrid. Lots of SS shit going on in there and you can hear it. I don't like it at all, it certainly aint a 6505.
Gilchrist custom
Yamaha SBG500
Telecasters
Randall RM100 & RM20
Marshall JTM45 clone
Marshall JCM900 4102 (modded)
Marshall 18W clone
Fender 5F1 Champ clone
Atomic Amplifire
Marshall 1960A
Boss GT-100


Cathbard Amplification
My band
#23
Quote by Cathbard
The H&K is a hybrid. Lots of SS shit going on in there and you can hear it. I don't like it at all, it certainly aint a 6505.


According to the specifications on H&K website, it has four EL84 tubes and three 12AX7 tubes. It has some weird things on it, but, if you use it at 36 watts, I think the sound is all tube. Somebody correct me if I'm wrong. If you scale it down to the 18 or 5w options, then I think the clean channel gain would start as solid state.
Last edited by afdgdfa at Dec 28, 2016,
#25
Quote by Cathbard
The H&K is a hybrid. Lots of SS shit going on in there and you can hear it. I don't like it at all, it certainly aint a 6505.


As for the 6505 series, I like the 6505 Plus a lot. I mean I like the way it sounds. I'm not very into the regular 6505 (non-Plus) sound, like with the 20w 6505 mini head. The mini head is versatile, but, to me, it doesn't sound good clean like the 6505+, and it only sounds good in "Crunch" if you like the UK style tubes. It doesn't have the 6L6s like the 6505+.

The 6505+ is very much on the table for me still. Not quite so much the 20w 6505 head.
Last edited by afdgdfa at Dec 28, 2016,
#26
The H&K has an op-amp front end. That makes it a hybrid, man.
Gilchrist custom
Yamaha SBG500
Telecasters
Randall RM100 & RM20
Marshall JTM45 clone
Marshall JCM900 4102 (modded)
Marshall 18W clone
Fender 5F1 Champ clone
Atomic Amplifire
Marshall 1960A
Boss GT-100


Cathbard Amplification
My band
#27
Okay. It does have an op-amp. I thought it would only come into play at the lower watt settings when using the clean channel gain.

Anyway, that leaves me pretty much where I left off yesterday, but now I can almost narrow it down to the Peavy 6505+ combo and the Randall RD40 combo. Those are kind of the only two serious amps on the list. The RD40, unlike the RD45H, has spring reverb. So, it's real. And actually, I kind of respect that rather than put a bad digital reverb on the RD45H and RD45212, they went with no reverb at all. But then, I don't really use reverb a lot. So, the half stack V30 and RD45 head is still a decent option. Because half stack! And probably the RD45212 is still a contender too, since it is, after all, a 2x12. I mean, it's a 2x12. Enough said.
Last edited by afdgdfa at Dec 28, 2016,
#28
id go for one of the randells, best sounding amps you listen easily.
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#29
afdgdfa before you start looking for an amplifier you should get the basic principles of tube amplifiers.

The power (measured in W) is not how loud the amplifier is. It reflects how loud you can play clean before the amp starts distorting. Also, higher powered amps tend to have more bass as bass frequencies require more power.

The speaker power rating (again in W) is not how loud it is but it reflects the heat build-up it can withstand. The speaker volume is dependant on the efficiency of the speaker. Loudness is related to peak pressure of a speaker which shows the air pressure it is able to achieve in dB. The speaker choose has a huge impact on your tone. Speakers tend to be designed for specific tones.

A 2x12 cabinet is not stereo. You need 2 amps with a speaker system for each. Most stereo setups require the use of stereo effects to have a different sound to each channel otherwise it would be repetition of the same thing and not true stereo.
Last edited by Gab_Azz at Dec 29, 2016,
#30
Quote by afdgdfa
Okay. It does have an op-amp. I thought it would only come into play at the lower watt settings when using the clean channel gain.

Anyway, that leaves me pretty much where I left off yesterday, but now I can almost narrow it down to the Peavy 6505+ combo and the Randall RD40 combo. Those are kind of the only two serious amps on the list. The RD40, unlike the RD45H, has spring reverb. So, it's real. And actually, I kind of respect that rather than put a bad digital reverb on the RD45H and RD45212, they went with no reverb at all. But then, I don't really use reverb a lot. So, the half stack V30 and RD45 head is still a decent option. Because half stack! And probably the RD45212 is still a contender too, since it is, after all, a 2x12. I mean, it's a 2x12. Enough said.


My $0.02:

The RD45 212 is going to be heavy as hell. For that matter, so will the 112 combos. I know what you're saying:

"Heavy? So what, I'm a boss, I'll handle it no problem!"

But man, that shit gets so old. On the other hand, the RD45H with a separate cab is a lot more manageable. Heavy yes, but not nearly as bad as all together. Honestly, whatever reverb you get from the combos will probably sound pretty lame (I had the 6505+ combo and I can say it definitely does, the Randall will probably be similar given the price point), spring or not. A good pedal is almost always the way to go, barring a few excellent examples.

As I mentioned earlier, the reception to the RD series seems pretty positive. If these are your choices at this point, I'd go RD head.
I'm just a kickin' and a gougin' in the mud and the blood and the beer.
#31
Quote by dementiacaptain
Honestly, whatever reverb you get from the combos will probably sound pretty lame (I had the 6505+ combo and I can say it definitely does, the Randall will probably be similar given the price point), spring or not. A good pedal is almost always the way to go, barring a few excellent examples.
.


+1 to all of this. Honestly, onboard reverb shouldn't even be a factor when considering a metal amp. I have the 6505+ 112 as well, and the real spring reverb is pretty lame. I mean, it doesn't sound terrible, but even on the maximum setting it doesn't do hardly enough to hear a reverb effect. The real spring reverb in my Classic 30 is even more lame -- can't stand how it sounds; it doesn't really sound like I'm playing in a big room. Anyhow, my DIGITAL Hall of Fame pedal sounds amazing by comparison. Sounds like I'm really playing in a large room, hall, or an actual European cathedral when it's set that way. There is absolutely no drawback to digital reverb units these days, and with the exception of the reverbs found in high-end metal amps such as the Mesa Mark V; Road Kings, etc. -- pretty much most people that use a lot of reverb get it through a pedal...and most often those pedals are digital.
Atmospheric dark metal w/ black and death metal influences:
(My Soundcloud page):

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Last edited by KailM at Dec 29, 2016,
#32
Quote by Cathbard
The H&K is a hybrid. Lots of SS shit going on in there and you can hear it. I don't like it at all, it certainly aint a 6505.


well, i suspect it is, anyway. the 18 certainly is. the 36 has an extra preamp tube, so *might* be all-tube. but i'd tend to agree with you, i'll be suspecting it's not all-tube until it's proven it is, kind of thing.

those blackstars are hybrid as well, fwiw.
I'm an idiot and I accidentally clicked the "Remove all subscriptions" button. If it seems like I'm ignoring you, I'm not, I'm just no longer subscribed to the thread. If you quote me or do the @user thing at me, hopefully it'll notify me through my notifications and I'll get back to you.
Quote by K33nbl4d3
I'll have to put the Classic T models on my to-try list. Shame the finish options there are Anachronism Gold, Nuclear Waste and Aged Clown, because in principle the plaintop is right up my alley.

Quote by K33nbl4d3
Presumably because the CCF (Combined Corksniffing Forces) of MLP and Gibson forums would rise up against them, plunging the land into war.

Quote by T00DEEPBLUE
Et tu, br00tz?
#33
I'm on the same page with all of these suggestions. You can also pick up a Mesa Single Rectifier for under $800. Several on Reverb.com right now.
Guitars:
Jackson Kelly KE3 - MIJ (Distortion/Jazz)
Jackson DKMGT Dinky (EMG 81/85)
ESP E-II Eclipse Custom (JB/'59)
ESP LTD EC-1001FR (EMG 81/60)
Fender MIM Strat

Amps:
Mesa/Boogie Dual Rectifier Roadster 212
Laney IronHeart IRT-Studio
Peavey Vypyr 30
Peavey ReValver Amp Sims
TOOOO many T.C. Electronic Pedals. . .
#34
+1 to a rectoverb combo.
WTLT 2014 GG&A

Quote by andersondb7
alright "king of the guitar forum"


Quote by trashedlostfdup
nope i am "GOD of the guitar forum" i think that fits me better.


Quote by andersondb7
youre just being a jerk man.



****** NEW NEW NEW!
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2017-04-13 RUN AWAY from COMPUTERS!!! TCE? RANT ALERT!!!
2017-03-02 - Guitar Philosophy 1001- Be Prepared For the Situation (Thursday 2017-03-02)
2017-02-21 How to Hot-Rod the Hell of your Stratocaster for $50! (Tuesday 2017-2-21)
Resentments and Rambling from a Guitar Junkie
---> http://trashedengineering.blogspot.com/
#35
I'm no expert, I'm pretty new to guitar, but I think the Peavy 6505+ I ended up getting is awesome for metal.
#36
romeozdistress

I'm kinda warming up to the Randalls. I mean, reverb on an amp is nice, but how much spring reverb do you really use? I think, especially if we are talking metal, plate or room are more the sounds people use on leads and for clean parts, not spring. So, not having reverb on some of the Randalls isn't a dealbreaker, because if you want reverb, you are probably going to run a pedal for it anyway. Plus you have to love the 2x12 and half stack options Randall has in that price range.
#37
Quote by dementiacaptain
My $0.02:

The RD45 212 is going to be heavy as hell. For that matter, so will the 112 combos. I know what you're saying:

"Heavy? So what, I'm a boss, I'll handle it no problem!"

But man, that shit gets so old. On the other hand, the RD45H with a separate cab is a lot more manageable. Heavy yes, but not nearly as bad as all together. Honestly, whatever reverb you get from the combos will probably sound pretty lame (I had the 6505+ combo and I can say it definitely does, the Randall will probably be similar given the price point), spring or not. A good pedal is almost always the way to go, barring a few excellent examples.

As I mentioned earlier, the reception to the RD series seems pretty positive. If these are your choices at this point, I'd go RD head.


No. Totally. Weight is definitely a thing. And you cant get a hand cart through certain areas or down steps. I know first hand how bad it sucks. But, I think "heavy" is also relative. I mean, to me, a 40lb cabinet is okay to move around, and/or a 35lb head. There's a reason why most guys go with something like a 40 watt combo, and that's because it's about the largest size which is still pretty easy to transport. Most of those are 40 to 50 pounds. Seems like that's the standard.
Last edited by afdgdfa at Dec 29, 2016,
#38
Quote by BriVamp
I'm no expert, I'm pretty new to guitar, but I think the Peavy 6505+ I ended up getting is awesome for metal.
The 6505+ might be the only one on my list which has been used on famous recordings. That goes a long way. It's a a great sounding amp. The cons it has, to me, are more about foot switching limitations, and things not having to do with sound.
Last edited by afdgdfa at Dec 29, 2016,
#39
Quote by afdgdfa
No. Totally. Weight is definitely a thing. And you cant get a hand cart through certain areas or down steps. I know first hand how bad it sucks. But, I think "heavy" is also relative. I mean, to me, a 40lb cabinet is okay to move around, and/or a 35lb head. There's a reason why most guys go with something like a 40 watt combo, and that's because it's about the largest size which is still pretty easy to transport. Most of those are 40 to 50 pounds. Seems like that's the standard.


i have several combos that weigh in the 80+lb range. FWIW.
WTLT 2014 GG&A

Quote by andersondb7
alright "king of the guitar forum"


Quote by trashedlostfdup
nope i am "GOD of the guitar forum" i think that fits me better.


Quote by andersondb7
youre just being a jerk man.



****** NEW NEW NEW!
2017-07-07 2017-07-07 Update and a Chat On Noise Constraints *** NEW FRIDAY 7/7
2017-04-13 RUN AWAY from COMPUTERS!!! TCE? RANT ALERT!!!
2017-03-02 - Guitar Philosophy 1001- Be Prepared For the Situation (Thursday 2017-03-02)
2017-02-21 How to Hot-Rod the Hell of your Stratocaster for $50! (Tuesday 2017-2-21)
Resentments and Rambling from a Guitar Junkie
---> http://trashedengineering.blogspot.com/
#40
Quote by Dave_Mc
well, i suspect it is, anyway. the 18 certainly is. the 36 has an extra preamp tube, so *might* be all-tube. but i'd tend to agree with you, i'll be suspecting it's not all-tube until it's proven it is, kind of thing.

those blackstars are hybrid as well, fwiw.


That's what I read about it. At 36 watts, it's supposedly all tube. And yeah, now I'm afraid that it SOMEHOW might not be, because of some of the posts here, and because I don't understand the technical aspects of amplification. For one thing, I played an acoustic instrument for years, and still do. And it's the non-artistic side of your brain that handles all the technical math-like skills. So it's not shit I like to think about. Because it's no goddamn fun.
Last edited by afdgdfa at Dec 29, 2016,
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