#2
I know nothing about classical guitars.

Tuners OTOH. Since I don't own, and likely never will own a "smartphone", I use exclusively clip on, or stomp box "strobe tuners". Obviously the clip on variety would be best, if you are not planning to get an acoustic electric guitar.

It seems to me an online app would take tuner technology back quite a few years, since you'd need to put the phone or whatever on the table, and play the guitar into into it. Somewhere around I have an old Korg like that. But even it has a 1/4" cable input for an electric guitar.

I have a half dozen clip on standard tuners laying around, including the very popular "Snark". I find them too vague on the higher strings. In other words, you have to tweak the guitar's tuning, even after you've tuned it with a standard clip on.

So, I mostly use one of these: http://www.musiciansfriend.com/accessories/tc-electronic-polytune-clip-on-guitar-tuner?rNtt=clip%20on%20strobe%20tuners&index=2 Which dials even 12 strings in spot on, the first time.
#3
Do you need it to be acoustic/electric? You may be able to find a strictly acoustic model for a comparable price and higher quality.

Also one of those is a cutaway and the other isn't, pretty substantial difference, especially in the classical guitar world. Do you really need/want that cutaway? If you do that's fine, but you need to know what you are buying.

There are a lot of questions I could ask you, but as a general answer, Yamaha makes reliably good instruments at low prices. I would lean towards Yamaha.
My God, it's full of stars!
#4
They are both good guitars. I like the Cort - but that's my personal preference - you should really try both before you decide.
#5
Thanks for the answers!

I know, that it's more practical and comfortable in overall to use a clip-on tuner (I will get one someday), but less then these downsides, is that online tuner able to help to tune my guitar just fine?! (As I will get someday an 8 string electric, it will need a clip-on tuner that's able to deal with +2 lower strings too.)

Dreadnought [m]: I'm on to get a classical as my current western acoustic (Fender CD-140 SCE) has too much flaws (Tho' it wasn't cheap), strings are buzzing all around and somehow I think that for my big hands and fingertips a nylon classical would fit better. I know it's a big change in style of sound and play, but since I have this -somewhat- lame, unsetted Fender, and I'm on to deal with a switch in comfort for the benefit of a classical anyway.

And I want an electro-classical, since I have plans in the future to make some recording too (mini PC studio, with a DAC/Interface).

What are (would be) the downsides of the cutaway body you complained about?!

I have read on several forums that Cort makes good quality guitars, even in the lowest price range too...
Last edited by High9ter at Jan 2, 2017,
#6
High9ter The simple fact of the matter is, mostly all clip on tuners are "chromatic" anyway, so you're not limited to the tones available on a guitar in standard E-e concert pitch..

The tuner I posted likely has a range of perhaps C1 to C7, more than enough to accommodate, a guitar in various tunings, a bass guitar or fiddle, and any 7 or 8 string guitar you might run across.

As I tried to say before, any tuning strategy which limits you to 6 fixed pitches, sucks. Trust me, I've owned ancient 6 pitch early Korg electric tuners, and they sucked.

For example, you can't use such a tuner to tweak your guitar after a capo has been applied, and a guitar with a capo attached very often can benefit from being tuned to correct pitch, with the capo in place.

Again as an example, standard interval tuning with a capo on the 3rd fret would pitch as: G, C, F, Bb, D, & G.
Last edited by Captaincranky at Jan 2, 2017,
#7
As CC says, most are chromatic these days. I have a Snark that has a microphone in addition to a contact sensor. I find this useful, as I can clip it to my desk and use it from there, rather than clip it on the guitar. I also have a Planet Waves NS. It is small and neat, but is contact-only and, being black, would be very easy to lose. I've added a piece of string to mine to hook it on the tuner pegs.

Some contact tuners have a problem picking up low notes, and will work better using the 12th fret harmonic.
#8
Quote by High9ter
Thanks for the answers!

I know, that it's more practical and comfortable in overall to use a clip-on tuner (I will get one someday), but less then these downsides, is that online tuner able to help to tune my guitar just fine?! (As I will get someday an 8 string electric, it will need a clip-on tuner that's able to deal with +2 lower strings too.)

Dreadnought [m]: I'm on to get a classical as my current western acoustic (Fender CD-140 SCE) has too much flaws (Tho' it wasn't cheap), strings are buzzing all around and somehow I think that for my big hands and fingertips a nylon classical would fit better. I know it's a big change in style of sound and play, but since I have this -somewhat- lame, unsetted Fender, and I'm on to deal with a switch in comfort for the benefit of a classical anyway.

And I want an electro-classical, since I have plans in the future to make some recording too (mini PC studio, with a DAC/Interface).

What are (would be) the downsides of the cutaway body you complained about?!


A cutaway can change the tonal qualities and projection (loudness) of a guitar, though that isn't always the case, especially with cheaper guitars. It comes down to personal preference; I prefer cutaways on my steel string acoustics, but I prefer non-cutaway bodies on my classicals. If you're buying this guitar for non-classical reasons, it may make more sense in your case to go for a cutaway since you may be more likely to play on the higher frets. Try it out though, for sure.

I have read on several forums that Cort makes good quality guitars, even in the lowest price range too...


To be honest, I have no experience with Cort classical guitars. I recommend that think about the things that you want out of your guitar, and then play both of these (or similar) to get a feel for whether or not they can provide that.

Yamaha is a good low to medium range manufacturer, but that doesn't mean they are always they best choice for the price, especially when your preferences are considered.
My God, it's full of stars!
#9
Quote by High9ter
....[ ]....] I'm on to get a classical as my current western acoustic (Fender CD-140 SCE) has too much flaws (Tho' it wasn't cheap), strings are buzzing all around and somehow I think that for my big hands and fingertips a nylon classical would fit better. I know it's a big change in style of sound and play, but since I have this -somewhat- lame, unsetted Fender, and I'm on to deal with a switch in comfort for the benefit of a classical anyway.

Is your Fender genuinely "broken", or, "defective", or is it a lack of knowledge on your part which is not allowing you to fix it?

Here's a great setup guide, which at the very least, should allow you to diagnose any issues with the Fender:

http://thbecker.net/guitar_playing/guitars_and_setup/setup_page_01.html

In all reality, there are only two true defects which would not allow you to get the Fender to perform decently. Those defects are: 1: Neck is on at to high an angle in relation to the sound board, Or 2: The neck is genuinely twisted badly. Pretty much anything else can be cured with reasonably simple adjustments.

That's about it for recent purchases. For older instruments a bridge coming off, or a sunken or too a high, puffed up soundboard, could be deal breakers as well.

Also keep in mind, classical guitars have much higher actions than steel strings out of necessity.

I realize that far a person with big hands, the wider neck of a classical might bring you more comfort, but like I said, you can very likely get your Fender to play better than it does now.

One other thing with the Fender, check and make sure the brace under the front of the sound hole isn't cracked. That would cause too low of an action. The only reason I mention it is because I had this happen with a Fender "Sonoran". Given that a heavy package dropped on top of the Fender box could have caused this, it might have been shipping damage. That guitar I had to send back.

Quote by High9ter
I have read on several forums that Cort makes good quality guitars, even in the lowest price range too...
I have one issue with Cort. Their website doesn't say whether or not their guitars are equipped with adjustable truss rods. IMHO, these are indispensable for steel strings, and it doesn't really hurt to have them on classical necks either.

So, I would have to hold a Cort which I were contemplating buying, to see if it did indeed have a truss rod. Other than that, he who lives by bad advertising, or the omission of features in their advertising, dies by it as well.
Last edited by Captaincranky at Jan 2, 2017,
#10
Captaincranky: I couldn't figure it out whats and how deep is the issue with my Fender that causes the strings buzzing at the frets. I know that there could be three possibilities: 1. Neck is too high or low in angle, or twisted (that could be fixed most "easily") 2. The saddle on the bridge is is too high 3. The combination of the two. As I know that adjusting the neck with the rod isn't that easy and could be very time consuming (you need to lower and retune the strings before and after every little twist), and there could be the the saddle issue too, I will rather give it to the local musicians shop and ask them to re-string it (with a set of 10- 47 D'addarios) and to do it as "buzzless" as possible, even if I had to pay the extra for a proper setup or even for the additional luthier work. If there's juts a bit geller in the neck, i guess I could have done it myself, but smarter to have a professional to check everything.

I was once in a shop with my Fander and asked them to resolve the buzzing, but the guy just adjusted the neck a bit, under like 5-10 minutes, which I guess didn't effected and helped too much for longer time scale, rather was a quick fire service.

According Cort and trust rods: It would be "interesting" if they won't have trust rods in their guitars as they are a very popular manufacturer, and with this reputation I don't think they would do such a embarrassment. But still you made me uncertain, maybe I should make a dedicated thread asking the UG members experience.
Last edited by High9ter at Jan 5, 2017,
#11
Quote by High9ter
...[ ]....I was once in a shop with my Fander and asked them to resolve the buzzing, but the guy just adjusted the neck a bit, under like 5-10 minutes, which I guess didn't effected and helped too much for longer time scale, rather was a quick fire service.
No, there's not a whole heck of a lot which could be done with or to a neck in just a few minutes

Quote by High9ter
According Cort and trust rods: It would be "interesting" if they won't have trust rods in their guitars as they are a very popular manufacturer, and with this reputation I don't think they would do such a embarrassment. But still you made me uncertain, maybe I should make a dedicated thread asking the UG members experience.
Well, since Cort has only a very limited interest in left handed guitarists, I (granted personally), have little to no interest in them.

But since you asked, the company is Chinese, or another part(s) of Asia. And like I always say, "the good Chinese/ English translators get jobs at the UN, the C (or D) students, write instruction manuals for Chinese export goods" Althouh in fairness, Corts site isn't the worst I've seen.

So, you (having more interest currently in Cort than myself), would do well to start a poll thread or just a thread, on the topic.

You might also scoot off an email to Cort, as to if they do in fact, have adjustable truss rods in their guitars. An email would "kill two birds with one stone", so to speak, as it would tell you something about their willingness to attend to individual customer's service needs, or concerns.