#1
I'm wondering if Marshall's ever made anything like the amp I'm dreaming of: simple - volume, gain (footswitch would be amazing), eq, and maybe a reverb, 30 - 100 watts. I'm finding a lot that are a little close but in the end just over-complicated. I don't want to be overwhelmed with options in the amp: just a good solid clean and distortion sound, so that I can refine it with pedals.

The Master Lead Combo 5010 would be perfect except, as far as I can tell, there's no gain? Am I missing something?
#2
So you want two channels, or just one?

The Master Lead has preamp volume, which is gain. While not a tube amp, those amps are pretty good.
I'm just a kickin' and a gougin' in the mud and the blood and the beer.
Last edited by dementiacaptain at Dec 28, 2016,
#3
Quote by Evml5447
I'm wondering if Marshall's ever made anything like the amp I'm dreaming of: simple - volume, gain (footswitch would be amazing), eq, and maybe a reverb, 30 - 100 watts. I'm finding a lot that are a little close but in the end just over-complicated. I don't want to be overwhelmed with options in the amp: just a good solid clean and distortion sound, so that I can refine it with pedals.

The Master Lead Combo 5010 would be perfect except, as far as I can tell, there's no gain? Am I missing something?
Well the idea behind the "extra" controls, like treble, midrange, bass, resonance, presence, etc. is so that you do NOT have to use pedals as much, you can match the amp with your guitar and to get your sound with just the amp and guitar. Do not be overwhelmed or scared by the options an amp has, but learn how to use them.

Marshall's current "Vintage Re-Issues" and "Handwired" series seem to be simpler than the current multi-channel, multi tone-stack offerings, but are kind of pricey.
Last edited by Will Lane at Dec 28, 2016,
#4
dementiacaptain

Ah ok cool. Two channels would be cool if it had a footswitch, but not necessary really cause that's what I'd have the pedal for.

The Master Lead is 50 watts, so that's about as loud as 30 watt tube amp, am I right? Actually for that matter I think ideally I'd prefer tube. Maybe that's just a prejudice but I feel better about tube amps.
Last edited by Evml5447 at Dec 28, 2016,
#5
Will Lane

The thing I like about having a simple amp + pedal is that you can have two basic sounds available with just a click, not having to adjust any nobs while playing.
#6
Quote by Evml5447
Will Lane

The thing I like about having a simple amp + pedal is that you can have two basic sounds available with just a click, not having to adjust any nobs while playing.
Well why would you need to adjust treble, mids, bass, etc. knobs on a "not-simple" amp when engaging an outboard pedal? It is not like the settings on the amp change when you turn on the pedal.
Last edited by Will Lane at Dec 28, 2016,
#8
Quote by Will Lane
Well the idea behind the "extra" controls, like treble, midrange, bass, resonance, presence, etc. is so that you do NOT have to use pedals as much, you can match the amp with your guitar and to get your sound with just the amp and guitar. Do not be overwhelmed or scared by the options an amp has, but learn how to use them.

Marshall's current "Vintage Re-Issues" and "Handwired" series seem to be simpler than the current multi-channel, multi tone-stack offerings, but are kind of pricey.


I've been playing a JVM 210 lately, and that is one of the more complex amps I've ever dealt with. (Coming from playing a twin reverb for rock stuff, and a 6505+ for metal). It took me a long while to get used to all of the gain stages and volume controls, but in the end I'm so much happier using this amp than the twin reverb or the 6505+. I play in a cover band that covers lots of musical styles, so being able to have two channels, each with three gain stages is very essential to my rig. On top of that, I've been able to reduce the number of pedals I use quite a bit, because of all of the options the JVM has. Other than a tuner and noise gate, I just use a gain booster, phaser, and wah wah.

That being said, this is only ONE way of doing things. If I were playing a single type of music, like purely metal, the 6505 is a one trick pony, but it's really hard to beat for metal tone.

The JCM800 is a pretty simple and straightforward amp, and time tested to be one of the best out there.
#9
Quote by Evml5447
Will Lane

The thing I like about having a simple amp + pedal is that you can have two basic sounds available with just a click, not having to adjust any nobs while playing.
you can do that on an amp with a bunch of different knobs as well, just switch between channels if it's a 2 channel amp.


heck, you can even just turn down your guitar volume on a one channel amp to clean up the tone.


kinda confused on what you're looking for with a "minimalist" marshall amp...
[img]http://cdn.gs.uproxx.com/wp-content/uploads/2012/05/v.gif[/img]
#10
"Well why would you need to adjust treble, mids, bass, etc. knobs on a "not-simple" amp when engaging an outboard pedal? It is not like the settings on the amp change when you turn on the pedal."

"kinda confused on what you're looking for with a "minimalist" marshall amp..."

The idea is to have two sounds with the amp: a clean sound and a moderately distorted sound (preferably switchable with a pedal) - and then, on top of that, another sound from the pedal (perhaps boost), a heavier distorted, or brighter screechier sound for intense leads. But if the amp has a plethora of tone setting (e.g gain, overdrive one, overdrive two, one of those classic-modern-tweed "gain type" settings, a tone shifter, etc.) it becomes a rather complicated affair when introducing the pedal in terms of keeping track of your three basic sounds. My view is that a basic eq and gain on the amp, if it's a good amp, is enough tone control for a basic clean and basic gain sound, but if you want to add another setting with a pedal, like a boosted, more intense setting, then the variety should come from the pedal itself, so as to be adjustable without worrying about changing the first two sounds.
Last edited by Evml5447 at Dec 28, 2016,
#11
Marshall has made quite a few minimalist amps. Everything from the Bluesbreaker / JTM-45 to the JCM 800 is pretty straight forward and simple.
Gear: Gibson Les Paul Studio, Gibson SG Special, Fender Stratocaster, Fender Telecaster, Fender Jazzmaster, Gretsch Pro Jet, Carvin C350, Epiphone ES-339 P90, Epiphone ES-335 Pro. Peavey 6505, Sovtek MIG-100, Vox AC30, Peavey XXX.
#12
sounds like you're overcomplicating yourself, imo. as far as I know, most of the modern amps will have some kinda diode/led to show you which setting you're on, and if you never switch to the other setting then it wouldn't be hard to keep track of your sounds.


hey fair enough if you want an amp with minimal settings, but it seems like your reason for it is a bit overcomplicated
[img]http://cdn.gs.uproxx.com/wp-content/uploads/2012/05/v.gif[/img]
#13
Evml5447 The reason why amps have complicated tone stacks and multiple channels is because typically you will want to EQ and generally set your clean channel differently than how you set your lead channel. So each channel has its own tone stack and tone-shaping capabilities that are NOT shared with the other channel. Essentially what you end up with is 2 different amp sounds from the same amp, rather than the EQ of the clean channel being applied to your dirty channel. With a multi-tone stack amp, you set both the channels once and you are done. The footswitch just switches between the two, that is it. Use an outboard boost/OD pedal if you like. But no other tinkering is necessary after you set the channels the first time.

Running an multi-channel amp with a shared/non-adjustable tone stack can work, but you run into the issue you stated above- if you set it one way for your clean channel, it may not work well for your dirty channel and so you will need to adjust settings during the song. So the "complicated" control panel is there to help you out- to separate the tone-shaping you do to one channel, from the tone-shaping you do to the other channel.

For example. Maybe the amp is too loud when the dirty channel is engaged, but it is just right with the clean channel- but since they use a shared master volume, you cannot really do anything about it. Or maybe the drive channel is too bright and so not only do you have to switch the footpedal to turn it on, but you have to roll back your guitar's tone knob as well. That is why I am saying having a simple amp with simple controls can end up holding you back rather than being the freeing utility you want. You end up with the exact problem you want to avoid.
Last edited by Will Lane at Dec 28, 2016,
#14
Quote by Evml5447
"Well why would you need to adjust treble, mids, bass, etc. knobs on a "not-simple" amp when engaging an outboard pedal? It is not like the settings on the amp change when you turn on the pedal."

"kinda confused on what you're looking for with a "minimalist" marshall amp..."

The idea is to have two sounds with the amp: a clean sound and a moderately distorted sound (preferably switchable with a pedal) - and then, on top of that, another sound from the pedal (perhaps boost), a heavier distorted, or brighter screechier sound for intense leads. But if the amp has a plethora of tone setting (e.g gain, overdrive one, overdrive two, one of those classic-modern-tweed "gain type" settings, a tone shifter, etc.) it becomes a rather complicated affair when introducing the pedal in terms of keeping track of your three basic sounds. My view is that a basic eq and gain on the amp, if it's a good amp, is enough tone control for a basic clean and basic gain sound, but if you want to add another setting with a pedal, like a boosted, more intense setting, then the variety should come from the pedal itself, so as to be adjustable without worrying about changing the first two sounds.


while I understand that it can get "complicated" it also avoids compromise. I greatly prefer to have separate tone control for at least the clean and drive channels. the settings for a great clean tone often aren't the same as those for a great distortion tone. I have a 3 channel (foot switchable) amp with separate tone controls for the clean channel and shared on the crunch/distortion channels. along the lines of what you are talking about I set my clean tone and then set the crunch and distortion channels for rhythm sounds. I then add my overdrive pedal in for leads. this gives me 6 options and is still fairly easy to deal with.
#15
sidenote: you didn't share what your budget is, which is a huge factor especially when it comes to something like marshalls
[img]http://cdn.gs.uproxx.com/wp-content/uploads/2012/05/v.gif[/img]
#16
Will Lane

Ah, I see what you mean. That's really helpful, thanks. Do you (or anyone) have a recommendation for something like this? What I want is a clean sound, a distorted sound, and then basically a boosted distorted sound. So I guess something that has an EQ for both the clean and the gain channel, and then maybe a boost on the gain channel too? Or if not the boost I could just get a pedal.

I think I'd need at least 30w (tube), and I'd pay $1000 if the amp is perfect and I don't need to buy pedals.
Last edited by Evml5447 at Dec 28, 2016,
#17
Quote by Evml5447
Will Lane

Ah, I see what you mean. That's really helpful, thanks. Do you (or anyone) have a recommendation for something like this? What I want is a clean sound, a distorted sound, and then basically a boosted distorted sound. So I guess something that has an EQ for both the clean and the gain channel, and then maybe a boost on the gain channel too? Or if not the boost I could just get a pedal.

I think I'd need at least 30w (tube), and I'd pay $1000 if the amp is perfect and I don't need to buy pedals.


most of the time you'll benefit from having an overdrive even if the amp seems "perfect"
#18
Quote by Evml5447
Will Lane

Ah, I see what you mean. That's really helpful, thanks. Do you (or anyone) have a recommendation for something like this? What I want is a clean sound, a distorted sound, and then basically a boosted distorted sound. So I guess something that has an EQ for both the clean and the gain channel, and then maybe a boost on the gain channel too? Or if not the boost I could just get a pedal.

I think I'd need at least 30w (tube), and I'd pay $1000 if the amp is perfect and I don't need to buy pedals.



I'd take a look at the JVM series. the 200 series comes with two channels, built in reverb, and a master volume switcher.
#19
danielwewo

The JVM combos look perfect but are very pricey, about 2700 Canadian. I'm looking to spend no more than about 1000 Canadian. Maybe that's not possible for the quality I have in mind?
#20
DSL40 is great for the less than $1000 range, you should check that out
[img]http://cdn.gs.uproxx.com/wp-content/uploads/2012/05/v.gif[/img]
#21
Find an old JCM2000 DSL100/50 made after 2003. This thread has this amp written all over it
Gilchrist custom
Yamaha SBG500
Telecasters
Randall RM100 & RM20
Marshall JTM45 clone
Marshall JCM900 4102 (modded)
Marshall 18W clone
Fender 5F1 Champ clone
Atomic Amplifire
Marshall 1960A
Boss GT-100


Cathbard Amplification
My band
#22
I was gunna say.. from the expanded criteria... JCM 2000 DSL was looking good. I think you'd still need a boost pedal though. Granted the amp has a boost switch, but... I don't believe you can activate it via the footswitch for the amp.

The other amp I thought of, but, it isn't a Marshall and it has a third eq bank to deal with - Peavey JSX.

JSX has a clean channel, crunch channel, and an ultra channel that is pretty much a boosted crunch channel. Might not have the voicing you're looking for though.
Gear: Gibson Les Paul Studio, Gibson SG Special, Fender Stratocaster, Fender Telecaster, Fender Jazzmaster, Gretsch Pro Jet, Carvin C350, Epiphone ES-339 P90, Epiphone ES-335 Pro. Peavey 6505, Sovtek MIG-100, Vox AC30, Peavey XXX.
#23
I think the JCM2000 DSL401 takes the cake. Two channels and a boost on the second one.

Thanks everybody!
#26
Evml5447 the dsl is a great amp, another to consider is/was the vintage modern 50 watt.
I wondered why the frisbee was getting bigger, then it hit me.