#1
I want to learn to play them all. Are they the same? or they differ from each other (I mean if I learned to play one, would I be able to play them all? not literally but I mean they have the same way..you just know what I mean)

If they do, then what do you think should I learn first..
#2
They are all vaguely different but very similar and the skills are fairly transferable. Think of Electric guitar as Danish, acoustic guitar as Norwegian Bokmål, and ukulele as Swedish and that is roughly how similar they are.
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#3
Electric and acoustic guitars are tuned the same, so if you can play one you can play the other. The way they feel and some of the finer points of technique (mainly muting) are a little different, and the style of playing is a little different, but if you can play one you can play the other.

The ukulele is tuned completely differently, so any chords or scales you know on the guitar are going to be very different on the ukulele, but the physical mechanics (pushing strings against frets, strumming) are roughly the same, so it doesn't take too long to learn if you already know how to play a guitar. Basically, if you know how to play a fretted stringed instrument it's fairly easy to learn another fretted stringed instrument, you just might have to learn some different chord and scale shapes if it's tuned differently than you're used to.
#5
The4thHorsemen

Actually, the four strings of ukulele are the same as the four highest strings of the guitar so you can use the same shapes.
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#6
Quote by The4thHorsemen
The ukulele is tuned completely differently


Take your D string off and replace it with a D string tuned one octave higher. Put a capo on the 5th fret. Congratulations! You now have the same tuning as a ukulele. What I'm saying is that the shapes on a uke are, like Mag pointed out, exactly the same (other than the 4th string being an octave up).

Basically, if you know how to play a fretted stringed instrument it's fairly easy to learn another fretted stringed instrument, you just might have to learn some different chord and scale shapes if it's tuned differently than you're used to.


I mean there is some similarity between many but many stylistic differences in playing and very different technique. Going from guitar to mountain dulcimer, Alpine zither, or viola de gamba is quite a difference in terms of technique for example. Still fretted instruments though.
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#7
MaggaraMarine
theogonia777

Ah, my bad. I was thinking about mandolin tuning, GDAE, which is like an upside down guitar, where some of the shapes are like upside down guitar chords, and the scale shapes are weird because the interval between strings is a 5th instead of a 4th. I haven't played a mandolin or ukulele in a couple of years and got the tunings mixed up.

I mean there is some similarity between many but many stylistic differences in playing and very different technique. Going from guitar to mountain dulcimer, Alpine zither, or viola de gamba is quite a difference in terms of technique for example. Still fretted instruments though.


Well yea, stuff like the banjo, uke, mandolins, etc. are very similar, though there are differences in style and certain techniques that are more common or less common, but even with the more exotic fretted instruments they're still similar enough that if you're used to frets it's not radically different like brass, woodwind, percussion, etc. Someone who's already got the fret hand dexterity will have a huge leg up in learning.


Radioheader

Well, in the case of the ukulele the A major chord would be

0
0
1
2

compared to the guitar's open A major chord would be

0
2
2
2
0
x

but you could also play this A chord on the guitar:

5
5
6
7
x
x

and it would be basically the same voicing and same shape as the ukulele version.

You can play the same chord shapes as on a guitar, just leaving out the two biggest guitar strings, and it would be the same as playing those chords on a guitar that's capoed at the 5th fret (or else do some transposing), unless it's a larger ukulele tuned to DGBE, where it would be exactly the same shapes as the four smallest strings on a guitar. In that case the 2100 voicing mentioned above would be E major.
#8
Yes, you can learn to play them all, no problem - I do, and lap steel as well - but playing them all well is a different matter. I played acoustic for over 30 years before I started played electric, and I have never developed a good touch for the latter, because of the need for string damping.

Which you should start with depends on your main genre(s) interest - you have to want to play music, not the instrument, to succeed.