#1
Hi guys I am going to do some acoustic covers. I ve already bought a Focusrite Scarlett Solo. Now I am looking to buy a good electroacoustic.
The options I have are:

1: Fender CD60ce
2: Yamaha FX310a ( Basically an F310 with some sort of pickups)
3: Yamaha F310 and Fishman NeoD or Seymour Duncan Woody Soundhole pickup Combo.
4: Cort AD880ce.
5: Ibanez PF15ece.

The guitar should sound decent both plugged and unplugged.
Also I cannot buy used ones as I am from India and its pretty tough to find used gear.
Last edited by cyruseternity at Dec 31, 2016,
#2
First, I'd scratch the Ibanez. I have 2 of the brand, and they never fail to disappoint me. However, Ibanez A/Es tend to "come alive" when plugged in. Or at least go from mediocre to decent.

I can't picture the Yamaha 310 being all that good unplugged.

If the Cort is a solid top, that would be a good one to try a grab a listen at.

The Fender CD-160-SCE would be my choice if I were buying a Fender But the SPRUCE topped one NOT the mahogany.

For Yamaha, I'd try to score Either a FGX-700 or its replacement the FGX-800.

If you can swing the price of either of those, I think they would have better unplugged performance then any of you current choices.

I never seem to be able to cull the specs I need to make a decision from Cort's website. They tell me the topo of the ad-880 is "spruce", and that's it. Cort doesn't even say whether or not their necks have adjustable truss rods, and I find that quite unnerving...
#5
I would look at the Yam FGX700/800 as suggested or a Cort. If Takamine is available in your area it is also worth a look. I don't care for Fender or Ibanez acoustic guitars at all. If you plan on recording, acoustic guitar ALWAYS sounds better mic'd rather than plugged-in.
"Your sound is in your hands as much as anything. It's the way you pick, and the way you hold the guitar, more than it is the amp or the guitar you use." -- Stevie Ray Vaughan

"Anybody can play. The note is only 20 percent. The attitude of the motherfucker who plays it is 80 percent." -- Miles Davis

Guthrie on tone: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zmohdG9lLqY
#6
Quote by Cajundaddy
I would look at the Yam FGX700/800 as suggested or a Cort. If Takamine is available in your area it is also worth a look. I don't care for Fender or Ibanez acoustic guitars at all. .
The solid top Fenders are decent. Unfortunately, Yamaha's prices seem to be much higher in different regions.

Here's in the US, you can have the Fender CD-140-SCE or the Yamaha FGX-800 for virtually identical prices. With some of the price quotes I've picked up over the years, that doesn't seem true worldwide.

In any event, AFAIK, you're completely correct about the Ibanez acoustics in the price range being discussed, being sonic monstrosities.

In own a Fender "Sonoran", which is basically the CD-140-SCE I've recommended, with a kitschy Stratocaster maple neck. Depending on personal taste, the CD-140 might sound better to some ears, having the slightly less bright, (ostensibly), mahogany neck.

Oh and while I'm here, Happy New Year to both of you!
#7
Quote by Captaincranky
The solid top Fenders are decent. Unfortunately, Yamaha's prices seem to be much higher in different regions.

Here's in the US, you can have the Fender CD-140-SCE or the Yamaha FGX-800 for virtually identical prices. With some of the price quotes I've picked up over the years, that doesn't seem true worldwide.

In any event, AFAIK, you're completely correct about the Ibanez acoustics in the price range being discussed, being sonic monstrosities.

In own a Fender "Sonoran", which is basically the CD-140-SCE I've recommended, with a kitschy Stratocaster maple neck. Depending on personal taste, the CD-140 might sound better to some ears, having the slightly less bright, (ostensibly), mahogany neck.

Oh and while I'm here, Happy New Year to both of you!

Thanks mate and same to you.
#8
Quote by Cajundaddy
I would look at the Yam FGX700/800 as suggested or a Cort. If Takamine is available in your area it is also worth a look. I don't care for Fender or Ibanez acoustic guitars at all. If you plan on recording, acoustic guitar ALWAYS sounds better mic'd rather than plugged-in.

Well! After going through your suggestion, I think I can dump the idea of getting an electroacoustic, instead Ill go for a pure acoustic one. I ve tested a few acoustic guitars today ie Yamaha fg700s, Takamine G320s, Epiphone Aj220s and Washburn WD20s and honestly speaking all felt the same tone wise. Maybe my ears are not that much developed but I really liked all of them maybe the Washburn was a tad better. Can you guys suggest me one from the above list?
Last edited by cyruseternity at Jan 1, 2017,
#9
Quote by cyruseternity
Well! After going through your suggestion, I think I can dump the idea of getting an electroacoustic, instead Ill go for a pure acoustic one.
Well, if you're just going to record with it, you have a decent mic, and a place which is quiet with respect to outside noise, then that's not the end of the world. However if you're going to gig with the guitar, then you should probably wait and get an E/A instrument.

Quote by cyruseternity
I ve tested a few acoustic guitars today ie Yamaha fg700s, Takamine G320s, Epiphone Aj220s and Washburn WD20s and honestly speaking all felt the same tone wise. Maybe my ears are not that much developed but I really liked all of them maybe the Washburn was a tad better. Can you guys suggest me one from the above list?
You might think that sound is the only viable comparator, and it is a big consideration, but not the only one, that's for certain.

Simply the length of time the strings have been on the guitar, and the alloy they're made of, are a huge consideration. The strings have a big impact on the overall tone. Another factor is feel. How does the guitar fit you and your body? Does it spark something in you more than the one next to it?

And of paramount importance, is the neck on at the right angle? Is there plenty of the White "saddle" sticking out of the bridge, so that when you go to set the action, there will still be some saddle left showing when the action is at the correct height?

How does it play off the rack? Is the action at the right height, yet you still have room for lowering it if need be? If that's the case, you're golden.

The guitars: The Epiphone AJ-220 would be the one I'd gravitate to first. Why, because I already have two EJ-200-SCE's with which I'm entirely satisfied.. It has a solid top, and you can always add some type of pickup system to it later, when the money finds its way to your hot, sweaty, eager to spend it as soon as possible, palms.

Sometime in the past, quality control could be an issue with Epiphone acoustics. However, both of my EJ_220's played right out of the box, and I've had no need to touch them, save for picking them up and playing them.

The Yamaha, (I believe), was the worlds biggest selling steel string flat top for a good long time. You can't go too far off the rails with one of those. You can't even buy one here in the US, as it's been replaced with the FG-800. Yamaha has made some wood choices, (IIRC), based on the expedience of material availability.

The Washburn I wouldn't touch wirh somebody else's ten foot pole. That prejudice I acquired about 20 years ago. At one time Washburn made a lot of left hand models, even 12 strings. However, when I went to sample them, the store had several, but in every case, that action was damned near 1/2" (12.70 mm), off the board. Unplayable by 6 string standards, and even more so with a 12 string. But as I say, that was my issue, and it happened 20 years ago. OTOH, they no longer make left handed 12 strings, so I guess I'll never know if they were capable of getting the problem straightened out. .

Don't you have someone more experienced with acoustics than yourself, who can help you out? Sometimes it's good to let somebody else play the guitar to you, so you can get a fix on the audiences reaction to it, instead of you listening to it from behind. Sometimes a clear, unemotionally affect head, can be the difference between a sensible purchase, and a disaster, should you need to be "talked down".

Here's a very good setup guide for acoustic guitars. Perhaps if you familiarize yourself with it before your next shopping trip, you'll be better equipped to deal with the buying experience
http://thbecker.net/guitar_playing/guitars_and_setup/setup_page_01.html


How much experience do you have evaluating electrics for these factors? But remember, acoustics are trickier to set up. There is sanding and grinding involved, not just a tweak here and there with a screwdriver.
Last edited by Captaincranky at Jan 1, 2017,
#10
The important part of the acoustic electric guitar is the top tone wood: mahogany, rosewood, ash, birch, walnut.. cedar, zebrawood, maple.. etc. AND the electronics component..

I chose Washburn Comfort Series WCG18CE grand Auditorium style with Fishman 301T because it is slimmer body and contour does make it easier.. i did put a Planetwave O-port to balance the sound..

Best suggestion is try a few guitars in the guitar store, to get a feel for which guitar feels more natural, comfortable and better organic sound for you.

If you do plan on getting an acoustic guitar amp.. try Fishman Loudbox mini, Fender Acoustasonic, Ibanez Troubadour T30, Marshall had acoustic amp too but forgot name.. (acoustic amps have more range in sound than regular electric guitar amps)
I have Washburn guitars 'Maverick Series' and bass 'Bantam Series' and a few pedals and amps, but man I wish to have more patience and drive practicing my playing, if it's equal to the modding itch, then I'm golden.
Last edited by psp742 at Jan 1, 2017,
#11
Quote by Captaincranky
Well, if you're just going to record with it, you have a decent mic, and a place which is quiet with respect to outside noise, then that's not the end of the world. However if you're going to gig with the guitar, then you should probably wait and get an E/A instrument.

You might think that sound is the only viable comparator, and it is a big consideration, but not the only one, that's for certain.

Simply the length of time the strings have been on the guitar, and the alloy they're made of, are a huge consideration. The strings have a big impact on the overall tone. Another factor is feel. How does the guitar fit you and your body? Does it spark something in you more than the one next to it?

And of paramount importance, is the neck on at the right angle? Is there plenty of the White "saddle" sticking out of the bridge, so that when you go to set the action, there will still be some saddle left showing when the action is at the correct height?

How does it play off the rack? Is the action at the right height, yet you still have room for lowering it if need be? If that's the case, you're golden.

The guitars: The Epiphone AJ-220 would be the one I'd gravitate to first. Why, because I already have two EJ-200-SCE's with which I'm entirely satisfied.. It has a solid top, and you can always add some type of pickup system to it later, when the money finds its way to your hot, sweaty, eager to spend it as soon as possible, palms.

Sometime in the past, quality control could be an issue with Epiphone acoustics. However, both of my EJ_220's played right out of the box, and I've had no need to touch them, save for picking them up and playing them.

The Yamaha, (I believe), was the worlds biggest selling steel string flat top for a good long time. You can't go too far off the rails with one of those. You can't even buy one here in the US, as it's been replaced with the FG-800. Yamaha has made some wood choices, (IIRC), based on the expedience of material availability.

The Washburn I wouldn't touch wirh somebody else's ten foot pole. That prejudice I acquired about 20 years ago. At one time Washburn made a lot of left hand models, even 12 strings. However, when I went to sample them, the store had several, but in every case, that action was damned near 1/2" (12.70 mm), off the board. Unplayable by 6 string standards, and even more so with a 12 string. But as I say, that was my issue, and it happened 20 years ago. OTOH, they no longer make left handed 12 strings, so I guess I'll never know if they were capable of getting the problem straightened out. .

Don't you have someone more experienced with acoustics than yourself, who can help you out? Sometimes it's good to let somebody else play the guitar to you, so you can get a fix on the audiences reaction to it, instead of you listening to it from behind. Sometimes a clear, unemotionally affect head, can be the difference between a sensible purchase, and a disaster, should you need to be "talked down".

Here's a very good setup guide for acoustic guitars. Perhaps if you familiarize yourself with it before your next shopping trip, you'll be better equipped to deal with the buying experience
http://thbecker.net/guitar_playing/guitars_and_setup/setup_page_01.html


How much experience do you have evaluating electrics for these factors? But remember, acoustics are trickier to set up. There is sanding and grinding involved, not just a tweak here and there with a screwdriver.

Well! Thanks for your advices, hopefully Ill take a buddy of mine to check out the guitars. Ill post the pics when I get one.
#13
Quote by Captaincranky
. . . The Washburn I wouldn't touch wirh somebody else's ten foot pole. That prejudice I acquired about 20 years ago. At one time Washburn made a lot of left hand models, even 12 strings. However, when I went to sample them, the store had several, but in every case, that action was damned near 1/2" (12.70 mm), off the board. Unplayable by 6 string standards, and even more so with a 12 string. But as I say, that was my issue, and it happened 20 years ago. OTOH, they no longer make left handed 12 strings, so I guess I'll never know if they were capable of getting the problem straightened out. . .


Well, Cap'n, a couple of years ago whilst on holiday I spent a happy hour in a little music shop I discovered. At least half of the stock were Washburn and I tried out most of them. Every one looked good and played and sounded great - all were very reasonably priced too. And the one of the best was a 12 string - played like a 6 string.

I would have happily bought any of them.
Last edited by Garthman at Jan 13, 2017,
#14
Garthman

As I hinted, my experience was, "a long, long time ago, in a galaxy far, far, away". I wound up buying an Epiphone lefty twelve, which was damned near as bad. The Epi had a ton of saddle showing, and I thought I could fix it. It didn't quite work out that way.

In any event, this was during the same time period, and I would swear it was an issue of poorly aligned jigs and badly trained, inexperienced workers in China.

I had a great deal of trepidation ordering the two Epiphone EJ-200's I have now, sight unseen. They're pushing 2 years old now, and I've never had to touch the action.

Like I said, my prejudice toward Washburn was anecdotal and based on old information. That notwithstanding, it's hard to know if Washburn uses an OEM, and if so, which OEM that might be.

It could be that both Epiphone and Washburn changed OEM's in the last 20 years. I'm told my EJ's come from Samick, but a lot of Epiphone (electrics??), are still made in China
Last edited by Captaincranky at Jan 14, 2017,
#15
I thought Epiphones were made in Indonesia now, and that the QC had improved? Not the case?
#16
Quote by Captaincranky
Garthman

. . . . . Like I said, my prejudice toward Washburn was anecdotal and based on old information. That notwithstanding, it's hard to know if Washburn uses an OEM, and if so, which OEM that might be.

It could be that both Epiphone and Washburn changed OEM's in the last 20 years. I'm told my EJ's come from Samick, but a lot of Epiphone (electrics??), are still made in China . .. . . . .


Oh I'm sure they are being made somewhere in the Far East: they would have to be to achieve the level of quality and workmanship at their price points. But these days that matters not a jot. Of course there are a lot of dirt cheap crap things available at $50 or something that you wouldn't want to own but in the mid price and > range there are some superb instruments available at very reasonable prices. Spec-for-spec you get comparable quality and workmanship to western made guitars at around 1/3 of the price or less.
#17
Quote by TobusRex
I thought Epiphones were made in Indonesia now, and that the QC had improved? Not the case?
Quote by TobusRex
I thought Epiphones were made in Indonesia now, and that the QC had improved? Not the case?
Well, they are made in Indonesia by Samick, and the quality is better. But bear in mind, I'm comparing the Indonesian Epiphones of today, with the Chinese Epiphones of 20 years ago. The entire Asian guitar industry's production standards have advanced dramatically over the past 20 years.

A lot of Yamaha guitars are made in China, and as you, along the rest of us are aware, the quality is great and the guitars come highly recommended.

Asians, like Americans these days, are glad to have steady jobs. One has to assume that workers in the musical instrument trade enjoy their work, are glad to have jobs, and quite possibly have been at their jobs for many years.

A quality guitar needs several primary factors for its success, skilled labor force, quality tools, quality machines, quality designs, and fully stocked woodpile. It's safe to further assume that with the tremendous amount of experience both the workers and the companies have accumulated via the sheer volume of sales, these factors have contributed greatly to the overall excellence of Asian guitars in general.

Quote by Garthman
Oh I'm sure they are being made somewhere in the Far East: they would have to be to achieve the level of quality and workmanship at their price points. But these days that matters not a jot. Of course there are a lot of dirt cheap crap things available at $50 or something that you wouldn't want to own but in the mid price and > range there are some superb instruments available at very reasonable prices. Spec-for-spec you get comparable quality and workmanship to western made guitars at around 1/3 of the price or less.
I'm not exactly sure why you've elected to, "preach to the choir" here. Since you're not dealing with anything remotely connected to a, "if it's not made in America, it's not any good", mind set on my part.

I did botch the syntax and intended meaning thoroughly in this sentence:
Quote by Captaincranky
It could be that both Epiphone and Washburn changed OEM's in the last 20 years. I'm told my EJ's come from Samick, but a lot of Epiphone (electrics??), are still made in China
I was actually musing as to whether a, "Washburn is actually a Washburn, or really a Cort or a Samick". While I expect that some OEMs are better than others, that really had nothing to do with the point I attempted, (and failed miserably), to make.

In other news, Indonesia now has a Cort factory. The Korean luthiers got pissed about low wages, went on strike, (? or something like one), and Cort said something to the effect of "f*** you", and took their ball to Indonesia. Lower wages obviously reduce costs, so we in the US, (and doubtless elsewhere), are reaping the benefits of Indonesian workers lower standard of living.

FWIW, Crafter is (AFAIK) still in Korea, and has capitulated to worker's demands. Their prices have gone up a fair amount, and it's particularly noticeable in the most recent prices of their hybrid (SA & SAT) series of semi-hollow bodies. (Taylor T-5 knockoffs). I don't know if this is true across their entire line, as I haven't shopped for guitars that much recently.
Last edited by Captaincranky at Jan 15, 2017,
#18
Quote by Captaincranky
. . . . I'm not exactly sure why you've elected to, "preach to the choir" here. Since you're not dealing with anything remotely connected to a, "if it's not made in America, it's not any good", mind set on my part. . . .


Hey, loosen up, Cap'n. I never preach - I was merely passing some true and positive comments on the quality and workmanship of mid range guitars made in the Far East. An awful lot of people on this and other forums seem to believe that it's not possible to obtain a high quality guitar unless you pay zillions of $$$$$ for one made in the USA or Canada.

I posted my comments in response to your statement:

"That notwithstanding, it's hard to know if Washburn uses an OEM, and if so, which OEM that might be.It could be that both Epiphone and Washburn changed OEM's in the last 20 years. I'm told my EJ's come from Samick, but a lot of Epiphone (electrics??), are still made in China"

Which seemed to me the be very critical of Chinese-made instruments. The remainder of your post above now does speak differently - which is good.
Last edited by Garthman at Jan 15, 2017,
#19
Quote by Captaincranky
. . . Lower wages obviously reduce costs, so we in the US, (and doubtless elsewhere), are reaping the benefits of Indonesian workers lower standard of living. . . . .


Indeed. But you in the US (and doubtlessly we elsewhere) pay the price of massive job loses - especially in the manufacturing industries - and the resulting creation of vast tracts of depressed communities across our countries. And it has all been caused by large companies in our countries moving their manufacturing abroad.

I think it's called Capitalism

I'm still not preaching, merely stating facts.
Last edited by Garthman at Jan 15, 2017,