#1
So my band is planing to enter the studio by the end of this month. Most of the guitar parts are gonna be recorded on my amp, but i have no idea when my tubes were even changed. I got it like 6 months ago used, and the i remember the guy saying he changed the poweramp tubes like 6 months prior to that, and i have no idea about the preamp tubes. Should i replace them all just for the hell of it? The amp sounds great btw, so i feel no need to change them. But it did just occur to me that one of them may fail during the recording process, and if i change it, it may affect the tone, and thats just gonna suck because everything will have to be rerecorded. The amp in question is an engl powerball 1. It even has some sort of led indicators that light up when the power tubes need replacing i think, and so far those have been dark.

So anyway, is it standard practice to do this before recording?
Joža je kul. On ma sirove z dodatki pa hambije.
#2
gorkyporky No. If the amp sounds good, just leave it. Likely it will be fine. Having backups on hand at all times is smart though. Changing out tubes will make very subtle differences, and especially in a dense mix you will not notice it- so if you do have to change a tube, I would not worry about it.
#3
Will Lane Yeah, i have a few spares on hand for both pre and poweramp. I just worried because they are not the same make as the ones in the amp. I know the difference is pretty minimal, but i thought it would be more obvious on recordings than live.
Joža je kul. On ma sirove z dodatki pa hambije.
#4
I have my tubes tested once a year- simple pass/fail. Some last 5 years, some have lasted 30 years or more. If it ain't broke, don't fix it.
"Your sound is in your hands as much as anything. It's the way you pick, and the way you hold the guitar, more than it is the amp or the guitar you use." -- Stevie Ray Vaughan

"Anybody can play. The note is only 20 percent. The attitude of the motherfucker who plays it is 80 percent." -- Miles Davis

Guthrie on tone: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zmohdG9lLqY
#5
^ right there with Cajundaddy

Keep the spares while in the studio and track safety DI track all the time parallel to your amp, so if it fails you can then reamp all the songs with the new sound using the safety DI. This is standard practice, so just as the engineer to track a DI track for you and other guitarists.
#6
Quote by diabolical
^ right there with Cajundaddy

Keep the spares while in the studio and track safety DI track all the time parallel to your amp, so if it fails you can then reamp all the songs with the new sound using the safety DI. This is standard practice, so just as the engineer to track a DI track for you and other guitarists.



plus. fucking. one.

Diabolical is absolutely right here. What's more important is a well set up guitar + new strings (a LOT of new strings).
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Quote by Anonden
You CAN play anything with anything....but some guitars sound right for some things, and not for others. Single coils sound retarded for metal, though those who are apeshit about harpsichord probably beg to differ.
#7
Quote by oneblackened
plus. fucking. one.

Diabolical is absolutely right here. What's more important is a well set up guitar + new strings (a LOT of new strings).


+2 Magoo.

Also, it wouldn't hurt to rent a spare guitar either, just in case. Or borrow one.

I never go into a session with any less than 5 guitars. Sometimes you need options.
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