#1
I have been playing on and off for 25 years. I love the instrument want to grow with it but, I don't have the motivation to pick it up and practice / play. I can pick up the guitar still and rattle of songs and the like with no problem but, I see it sitting there and I say "I'll get to it later". What have y'all done to get past not wanting to practice / play? How have you made the instrument "fun" again and got you back to picking up the instrument every day? Trying to make 2017 the year I get back to it and start to grow again as a player. Thanks for reading and thank you in advance for the advice and motivation.
#2
I think working towards certain goals are very motivating. Some goals could be learning certain songs, techniques etc. What would you describe as the strongest and weakest aspects of your playing?
Gear:
2011 Fender American Standard Stratocaster
2012 Tanglewood TW170

Boss Katana 100w 1x112
Line 6 HD500
#3
wyldelife
thought provoking question:

strongest: learning songs. Knowing I can play it exactly as it is played on the cd regardless of style.
weakest: frustration with speed. Though I do have some speed not as much as I would like. Sounding "muddy" with no clarity on my notes some times (slow or "fast").
#4
I don't know about you, but when I first started out my issue was that I was playing the wrong kind of music. I played acoustic songs - country, reggae, etc. I liked the songs well enough, but I was never into them, and so I also put off practicing. And then when I finally got my first electric guitar and heard some Avenged Sevenfold (my first experience with hard rock as a kid) I actually really loved the music and wanted to learn it. Thank god my music taste has changed since then. Anyway, that got me motivated; it wasn't that I didn't like playing, as I'm sure is not the case with you, it was just that I hadn't found the music I was really into yet.

Maybe you've already found what your style of music is, but if not, try considering other genres or artists, and find some music that you can connect with, in a way. If you can find something that you really want to learn, you'll be much less likely to put it off like I'm doing with annotating this book right now.

And in regard to your frustrations with speed and muddiness, perhaps you could also practice some improvisation. Learn a scale and improvise in it - you can set your own pace this way and ensure the notes ring out cleanly, plus you'll be slowly building your speed along with your musicality.
#5
Quote by jamesbrister2
wyldelife
thought provoking question:

strongest: learning songs. Knowing I can play it exactly as it is played on the cd regardless of style.
weakest: frustration with speed. Though I do have some speed not as much as I would like. Sounding "muddy" with no clarity on my notes some times (slow or "fast").


Chances are that what you perceive as "exactly as it is played on the cd" doesn't sound completly right. Any particular solo/riff etc, that is giving you trouble? If so, one thing you can do is practice that particular part after a metronome. Start at a speed where you can play it cleanly and go up. This would help with speed and also the process of eliminating muddiness.

Your guitar practice should be varied, which is good for your fingers, as well as your enjoyment of playing guitar. Therefore, I would advise you to use your practice time to cover other areas as well. Chances are (as with most players), your vibrato is subpar. This video: goes into great details explaining why. This is also something you can spend time with.

csch2 made a good point about improvisation, which can be a lot of fun. Which scales do you know, and do you know them to such a degree that you can switch positions flawlessly and such? Soloing after backing tracks is a great guitar work out as you can work on different aspects of your playing such as vibrato, speed, dynamics etc. at your own pace.

Do you have any video or audio of your playing? If you could provide that, it would be easier to come with some more detailed tips.
Gear:
2011 Fender American Standard Stratocaster
2012 Tanglewood TW170

Boss Katana 100w 1x112
Line 6 HD500
#6
i don't see it as practice. I try not to. The moment i start 'practicing' guitar I lose interest.
"ba doo doo ba doo doo ba doo daa"
- earth,wind, and fire