#1
Hi, I'm trying learn to play from notes instead of tabs. I've got a question about notes below and over the staff. For example I want to play piece in which all C notes are sharp ( for example a piece in D Major). Should I remember that there is actually a sharp accidental on the first line below the staff, on the second over the staff etc. or learn by heart scale pattern and e.g. when i see a note on the second line over the staff press e string on the 9th fret?
(i know that notes for guitar are transposed by an octave). Thanks in advance for help and sorry for bad english.
#3
jerrykramskoyI know that sharps and flats apply to every octave, i mean which of these two methods is better?
no 1:
piece is in c major => there is a note on the fifth line => press e string on 1st fret
piece is in g major => there is a note on the fifth line => press e string on 2nd fret

or more sophisticated no 2:
there is a note on the fifth line so it is f => there is sharp on f so i play f# => press e string on 2nd fret

hope that i showed what i mean more clearly
#4
Quote by GuitarPlayer696
jerrykramskoyI know that sharps and flats apply to every octave, i mean which of these two methods is better?
no 1:
piece is in c major => there is a note on the fifth line => press e string on 1st fret
piece is in g major => there is a note on the fifth line => press e string on 2nd fret

or more sophisticated no 2:
there is a note on the fifth line so it is f => there is sharp on f so i play f# => press e string on 2nd fret

hope that i showed what i mean more clearly


I'm not sure I find a distinction between these two.

I think you might benefit from doing some basic scale warmups to get your knowledge and technique synced up. Having the scales under your fingers makes it a LOT easier to read from the staff.

When I play, I'm really not thinking about fret numbers at all, just notes. The physical position of those notes only matters if I have to make a decision as to which F# or whatever makes sense in terms of technique.
#5
GuitarPlayer696

Well to be fair the B flat in major F isn't an accidental, its the key, the accidental would be if (while playing in F major) playing a B. The b flat is preserve the tone tone semitone tone relationship that makes a major scale a major.

This is a little easier on guitar than say a woodwind because you don't really have to memorize every sharp and flat in any scale, its just a pattern, and if you know F major bottom string to top string (ignoring positions) if you start the pattern on F you are playing F major if you start it on G you are playing G major (with an F#) etc.

This gets more muddled when you get into natural minors, C maj and A min are both all natural there are no sharps or flats, the tone/semitone relationship changes which is what makes A minor a minor.
#6
When reading from notation try looking at the shape of the music rather than each individual note. Look at whether the notes rise or fall and get used to how different intervals look on the page eg a third is from one space or line to the next space or line etc. It's useful to learn your scales in 3rds, 4ths, 5ths etc as well so you are used to finding these intervals in your fretboard without thinking about it. This is the reason why learning and practising scales is such an important aspect to being able to read music.