#1
Hey guys, I'm a newbie starting out playing the guitar and wanted to get some advice on the best and easiest one to start with. I used to have guitar lessons back in my school days but tbh they weren't much help. I found the teacher's guitar quite tough getting the hang on and it didn't really suit me. The strings just felt stiff and it wasn't much good. Can strings have different tightness? Anyway, I think I want to start with an acoustic guitar and then move onto electric once I get more comfortable. I'm quite short on money at the moment and not sure how long my determination is going to last so I don't think I'm going to buy one just yet. Been looking at the renting option. Browsing through google found some on a site called Fat Lama that I could rent off other musicians. Of the ones listed can anyone give me some tips on what the best one would be for beginners like me?

Any feedback would be much appreciated!

Thanks a lot,

Dom
#4
Don't rule out a used Variax. You'll be able to play both acoustic and electric along with 12 string versions of both. If you can't afford an amp right away it works fine through your PC.
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#5
Quote by domrichh4
(a) The strings just felt stiff and it wasn't much good. Can strings have different tightness? (b) Anyway, I think I want to start with an acoustic guitar and then move onto electric once I get more comfortable.


(a) Yes absolutely.

(b) If you're worried about tight strings, especially if you think you're going to move to it eventually anyway, I'd seriously consider starting on electric. While you can use as thick strings on electric as acoustic (and some players do), mostly you use much thinner strings on electric which are a lot less stiff.
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Quote by K33nbl4d3
I'll have to put the Classic T models on my to-try list. Shame the finish options there are Anachronism Gold, Nuclear Waste and Aged Clown, because in principle the plaintop is right up my alley.

Quote by K33nbl4d3
Presumably because the CCF (Combined Corksniffing Forces) of MLP and Gibson forums would rise up against them, plunging the land into war.

Quote by T00DEEPBLUE
Et tu, br00tz?
#6
Dave_Mc offers good advice. Electrics are sweethearts compared to acoustics when it comes to string sting It'll still hurt after awhile, until you get callouses. Here's an idea....surgical gloves. Thin gloves can help extend your playtime when you are learning. You won't build up callouses as quickly though.

Another option is a classical guitar. The fat, round nylon strings aren't uncomfortable at all to hold down. The problem is that nylon strings don't last nearly as well as steel strings or stay in tune as well either (in my experience). Plus classical guitars have such wide necks. Some people love them. Mine never gets playtime anymore because the high action bothers me.

If you get a steel string acoustic with a friendly neck it can help a lot, but your fingers will still get really sore until the callouses develop. Doesn't take long though, a couple weeks and you should be golden.
#7
The Fender FA-100 is pretty good. If the strings are too tough on you, just change them to a lighter gauge. I've had the FA-100 for about a year now and still looks brand new, couple of dents from when I've dropped it. Other than that its a pretty sturdy guitar, I think the price was around $125-$150, but I'm not going to lie, the guitar sounds pretty dull, but you'll barely notice it if you're barely starting to learn.
Last edited by TROUnation at Jan 10, 2017,
#8
Starting off on Acoustic is the best way to get used to playing Guitar. I'm 57 years old and have been playing for 45 years and that's pretty much how I started. IMO, the best guitar going right now for a beginner is the Yamaha F-335 . I just bought one for myself this past Friday at Guitar Center brand new, for only $119.99 and IMO, it sounds just as good if not better, than guitars that are in the 3-500 dollar range.
#10
^ That's the big problem. Aside from playing what you're most interested in (which is very important as it'll keep you motivated), if you start on the instrument which isn't your number 1 choice, you run the risk of never feeling quite comfortable on it once you swap over. Even after years. Which doesn't make much sense, at least if you ask me.

I still like guitars with wider nuts, for example, because the guitars I started playing on had wider nuts. I'm not as bad as I used to be (I used to barely be able to play at all on guitars with narrower nuts and would avoid them), but still given the free choice, I prefer guitars with wider nuts. And that's with having owned guitars with narrower nuts for years now.

Now, obviously everyone is different, so it may affect some people more than others, but it's very much worth bearing in mind if you ask me, since you won't know which group you're in until it's too late.
I'm an idiot and I accidentally clicked the "Remove all subscriptions" button. If it seems like I'm ignoring you, I'm not, I'm just no longer subscribed to the thread. If you quote me or do the @user thing at me, hopefully it'll notify me through my notifications and I'll get back to you.
Quote by K33nbl4d3
I'll have to put the Classic T models on my to-try list. Shame the finish options there are Anachronism Gold, Nuclear Waste and Aged Clown, because in principle the plaintop is right up my alley.

Quote by K33nbl4d3
Presumably because the CCF (Combined Corksniffing Forces) of MLP and Gibson forums would rise up against them, plunging the land into war.

Quote by T00DEEPBLUE
Et tu, br00tz?