#1
I recently got my first guitar for Christmas (a used Squire Affinity strat, Indonesian made) and an old amp from a friend. The old amp does have some amp buzz and I'm almost certain its not ground noise. I noticed that when I switch pickups there is little to no change in tone of the guitar. I was wondering if it could be a problem with the amp, or do I need to get new pickups.
#2
There's nothing wrong with the pickups, I can guarantee you that. It may be that the amp isn't particularly responsive, but in all honesty the most likely culprit is your ears. If you're new to the instrument then your ears will be inexperienced, it'll take time for your ears to become more discerning and for tonal differences to become more noticeable.
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#4
Could be 60 cycle hum...

Does the buzzing change depending on amp location or what other devices in the room are on?
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#5
As long as the pickups are producing sound they're working - it's their position on the guitar that makes them sound different from one another. The one closest to bridge will sound more "harsh" and have more treble, the one nearest the neck will sound more mellow with more bass. Are you playing with a lot of distortion? That would tend to minimize the difference in sound between the pickups.

Strat's use single coil pickups which will produce some hum. If you're playing with a clean sound, the hum will be minimal or even unnoticeable, but if you turn the distortion up it becomes very noticeable.
#6
You're probably hearing 60-cycle hum, which is perfectly normal on any non-noiseless single coil pickup. It will be much more noticeable with distortion than when playing clean.

That particular Squier is also a pretty entry-level guitar that is a solid axe to learn on, but not one I would recommend swapping pickups with. Just have fun learning with it, and worry about pickup swapping later on if you get more serious about guitar, and buy another one down the road.
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#7
steven seagull Yep, you're right, today when I was practicing it was like someone flipped a switch (quite literally) and I could notice the difference. As for the amp buzz I'm still not sure.
#8
Sometimes a surge protector will help with amp buzz. Sometimes its just the house wiring