#1
Hi
Im have been looking at electric guitars for a while now and I want to get advice (Im not planning to get it soon but its killing me). So the best combo I found for now is the
epiphone les paul standard: https://www.amazon.com/Epiphone-STANDARD-Electric-Guitar-Ebony/dp/B0002CZURO?tag=guitarfcomt-20
and a marshel 10 watt amp: https://www.amazon.com/gp/aw/d/B005ODB1YM/ref=bdl_pop_ttl_B005ODB1YM
I basicly want to play everything from RHCP/Led zeplin style to Children of bodom style (I dont think Im in the level for COB for now but it will probably be my only electric for couple of years).
So... Is it a good idea? Are there any other good options for this price range?
Huge thanks!
#2
what's your overall budget likely to be?

epi LP standards are generally considered to be pretty decent i think, the only concerns i'd have are that you have to know you like the LP shape (they can be heavy and upper-fret access isn't amazing) and also for the range of stuff you want to play, maybe an HSS or HSH superstrat might be a better idea (since a lot of RHCP is a strat; quite a lot of early Led Zep is a telecaster).

the MG isn't really much liked around here but it does depend on what your budget is.
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Quote by K33nbl4d3
I'll have to put the Classic T models on my to-try list. Shame the finish options there are Anachronism Gold, Nuclear Waste and Aged Clown, because in principle the plaintop is right up my alley.

Quote by K33nbl4d3
Presumably because the CCF (Combined Corksniffing Forces) of MLP and Gibson forums would rise up against them, plunging the land into war.

Quote by T00DEEPBLUE
Et tu, br00tz?
#3
The Epi LP standard is a decent enough guitar and for rock stuff it'll do great. But like Dave said, RCHP have a lot of single coil strat sounds which you cannot really get with a Les Paul. Even with the coil splitting options you more often get now with modern Les Pauls, they can only really half-ass it. This is one of the reasons why guitar players tend to own multiple guitars. If you only have 1 guitar and want to cover that wide a range of styles, you have to accept compromises and this is one of them. You'll need to decide what styles you want the guitar to be best at. HSS and HSH Strats are very versatile though.

Ultimately it's down to what is the most important thing to you. If Zepplin and some slightly harder styles are the most important thing to you, the Epi LP Standard is a good choice.

Stay away from any guitars that have any sort of double-locking Floyd Rose system (they're very common on superstrat-style guitars) because they're a pain in the ass to set up for beginners and are not user friendly whatsoever when you want to mess with alternate tunings. Budget guitars also tend to have poor quality Floyd Rose systems that really don't work very well anyway. Stick with guitars that have some sort of fixed bridge and you'll be spared a lot of headaches.

What exactly are you looking for in terms of feel in a guitar? Saying you want something which 'plays well' is unhelpful. Who doesn't? You need to give us specifics about what you want. What sort of body style are you looking for? What sort of neck profile are you looking for? What sort of neck thickness? What sort of fretboard radius? What sort of bridge? What sort of pickup configuration? What sort of neck construction? Those are the sorts of things you need to be thinking about when considering what guitar to buy.

Are you also willing to go used? There's no other way to get better bang for your buck if you go used.

As for amps, steer clear of the cheap Marshall MG's. Same with any of the Line 6 Spider amps. You have better sounding amps for the same money from other brands. Peavey's Vypyr amps are the best you can buy for the pricepoint imo. They just do everything in general better than the Marshall MG or Line 6 Spider offerings.

I would also strongly advise getting an amp that has at least a 12" speaker in it. Many newcomers do not appreciate how critical speakers are for tone. And the smaller 8" and 10" speakers you get in the smaller amps just cannot physically push enough bass and thus sound sound really thin, small and boxy. No amount of EQ'ing the amp is going to fix that, it's just the laws of physics with using smaller speakers. 12" speakers are the standard size in guitar cabinets, so go with that if at all possible. I think the Vypyr 30 watt is the smallest amp by Peavey that has a 12" speaker in it, so look into that.

I would strongly recommend going used with solid state modelling amps because the vast majority of people who sell them want to get rid of them because they've upgraded to a better amp that has made the modeller obsolete. But otherwise they work perfectly fine. Very, very little goes wrong with them so going used is a very safe bet and the used market is full of them. You may find with going used that you can afford more than you realised.
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#4
Based on your prices I'm guessing your budget is $500. You should consider used. You'll have much better options especially iin the amp selection. An $80 mg isn't something that will bring you a lot of satisfaction. Look through used section of GC website. I'd suggest $300 guitar and $200 amp to start. The quality improvement will be huge. As always iif you can stretch your budget a bit it only gets better.
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Dean V-Wing
Dean ML 79 SilverBurst
MXR M 108
H2O Chorus/Echo
Valve Junior (V3 Head/Cab and Combo)
VHT Special 6
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#5
Dave_McT00DEEPBLUEscott58
First of all thanks a lot you got me thinking
In case its not clear my budget (guitar+amp) is around 500$ maybe a bit more. I thought about buying used buy Im still a rookie so I dont want to buy something based on my hearing yet. I searched for hsh or hss pickups but its hard to find something I like in this budget but I will keep searching when Ill have more time.
I looked at Peavey's Vypyr amps but do I really need more than 10 watt if Im only playing at home for myself?
And if you got the time I will appreciate to get opinions on the Schecter Omen Extreme-6 (its hh too) compered to the les paul (https://www.amazon.com/Schecter-Extreme-6-Electric-Guitar-Cherry/dp/B0002NPR12/ref=sr_1_6?s=musical-instruments&ie=UTF8&qid=1483974388&sr=1-6&refinements=p_4%3ASchecter&th=1)
And again HUGE THANKS!
#6
Can't really address the omen to led Paul comparison. Never messed with an omen and the vast majority of led Paul's I've tried were $1000+ guitars. One example I can give is the difference in quality based on dollars spent. I have a knock around Dean ML Xp. Paid like $150 for it brand new. I also have an ml I got used for $400 ($799) brand new. Identical guitars until you pick them up. Blind folded you can tell the difference. Better finish, smoother frets, tunerss etc. Not just tone wise,but everything. Go for the highest quality you can find. What ever guitar it happens to be.

Amp wise more watts doesn't mean better you can look in the 5 watt range and be OK. More about what your looking to play and if it can get you in that range or a jack of all trades modeler that can do most things. Again more money usually means better sound quality and better options.

Edit: I've been trying to keep this as general as possible as there are so many different ways to go.toodeepblue gives a lot more detail and food for thought. SS modelling amps are great learning tools not just for playing, but also for effects you'll like and dislike.
Dean Icon PZ
Line 6 Variax 700
Dean V-Wing
Dean ML 79 SilverBurst
MXR M 108
H2O Chorus/Echo
Valve Junior (V3 Head/Cab and Combo)
VHT Special 6
Phonic 620 Power Pod PA
Wampler Super Plextortion
Line 6 Pod HD
Last edited by scott58 at Jan 9, 2017,
#7
Quote by T00DEEPBLUE
The Epi LP standard is a decent enough guitar and for rock stuff it'll do great. But like Dave said, RCHP have a lot of single coil strat sounds which you cannot really get with a Les Paul. Even with the coil splitting options you more often get now with modern Les Pauls, they can only really half-ass it. This is one of the reasons why guitar players tend to own multiple guitars. If you only have 1 guitar and want to cover that wide a range of styles, you have to accept compromises and this is one of them. You'll need to decide what styles you want the guitar to be best at. HSS and HSH Strats are very versatile though.

Ultimately it's down to what is the most important thing to you. If Zepplin and some slightly harder styles are the most important thing to you, the Epi LP Standard is a good choice.

Stay away from any guitars that have any sort of double-locking Floyd Rose system (they're very common on superstrat-style guitars) because they're a pain in the ass to set up for beginners and are not user friendly whatsoever when you want to mess with alternate tunings. Budget guitars also tend to have poor quality Floyd Rose systems that really don't work very well anyway. Stick with guitars that have some sort of fixed bridge and you'll be spared a lot of headaches.

What exactly are you looking for in terms of feel in a guitar? Saying you want something which 'plays well' is unhelpful. Who doesn't? You need to give us specifics about what you want. What sort of body style are you looking for? What sort of neck profile are you looking for? What sort of neck thickness? What sort of fretboard radius? What sort of bridge? What sort of pickup configuration? What sort of neck construction? Those are the sorts of things you need to be thinking about when considering what guitar to buy.

Are you also willing to go used? There's no other way to get better bang for your buck if you go used.

As for amps, steer clear of the cheap Marshall MG's. Same with any of the Line 6 Spider amps. You have better sounding amps for the same money from other brands. Peavey's Vypyr amps are the best you can buy for the pricepoint imo. They just do everything in general better than the Marshall MG or Line 6 Spider offerings.

I would also strongly advise getting an amp that has at least a 12" speaker in it. Many newcomers do not appreciate how critical speakers are for tone. And the smaller 8" and 10" speakers you get in the smaller amps just cannot physically push enough bass and thus sound sound really thin, small and boxy. No amount of EQ'ing the amp is going to fix that, it's just the laws of physics with using smaller speakers. 12" speakers are the standard size in guitar cabinets, so go with that if at all possible. I think the Vypyr 30 watt is the smallest amp by Peavey that has a 12" speaker in it, so look into that.

I would strongly recommend going used with solid state modelling amps because the vast majority of people who sell them want to get rid of them because they've upgraded to a better amp that has made the modeller obsolete. But otherwise they work perfectly fine. Very, very little goes wrong with them so going used is a very safe bet and the used market is full of them. You may find with going used that you can afford more than you realised.


Agreed, great post.

Only three things I can think of:

1) I wouldn't write off trems completely- considering an HSS or HSH superstrat might be a good option for what he wants, an awful lot of them come with trems. A non-locking, non-recessed trem (which can be blocked to give you a pseudo-hardtail, if necessary) is probably fine.

2) A lot of those specs you said he should be thinking about are things that plenty of people who've been playing guitar for years don't know about I certainly wasn't aware of a lot of that stuff until I'd been playing a long time (and really, until I found internet forums and had it pointed out to me). I mean, he didn't make clear exactly what his experience level is- if he's been playing acoustic or classical guitar for some time, then he may well be aware of this stuff. But if he's only starting out, I'd say learning about that stuff is overkill- plus it's the kind of stuff you can really find out about by playing a bunch of guitars, and if he doesn't play yet, that's kind of difficult to do.

Don't get me wrong, all of that stuff is really useful and is usually the type of stuff that more experienced players consider- but I think it's a bit much expecting beginners (if he is a beginner) to know all that. If you know what a pickup is as a beginner you're doing pretty well, if you ask me.

3) I'm not sure about used (as he said himself) if you're only a new player. I mean, I'm paranoid about getting ripped off going used and I've been playing for years. I may be too down on used... but I'd say that too many people around here (and on other forums) are too keen on it. You can get a great deal; you can also get ripped off. You kind of need to know what you're looking at (and I mean really know), and even then that's not much of a safeguard if you come up against a determined scammer (especially if you're buying unseen on Ebay or something like that).
I'm an idiot and I accidentally clicked the "Remove all subscriptions" button. If it seems like I'm ignoring you, I'm not, I'm just no longer subscribed to the thread. If you quote me or do the @user thing at me, hopefully it'll notify me through my notifications and I'll get back to you.
Quote by K33nbl4d3
I'll have to put the Classic T models on my to-try list. Shame the finish options there are Anachronism Gold, Nuclear Waste and Aged Clown, because in principle the plaintop is right up my alley.

Quote by K33nbl4d3
Presumably because the CCF (Combined Corksniffing Forces) of MLP and Gibson forums would rise up against them, plunging the land into war.

Quote by T00DEEPBLUE
Et tu, br00tz?