#1
So... This guitar has been in storage for almost 40 years, it belonged to my grandfather and now i want to see if i can restore it. I have played guitar for almost 10 years now but i know nothing about this guitar. This is an 11(yes, eleven) string guitar which i think is pretty weird, i know nothing about the brand (La Estudiantina) or what name should this instrument have. I am curious why this is an 11 instead of 12 and if it is worth even restoring.
I am hoping you guys can help me find out more about it.
THANK YOU ALL!


link to pictures of it:
https://drive.google.com/open?id=0BwWq2MmY9lHIY1dRZUYzRmhuMHc
Last edited by gerardoramos981 at Jan 8, 2017,
#2
Well, "it's the kind of guitar I've never seen before"....

With that said, it certainly has fancy appointments. While I can't verify their quality from the picture, it looks like it could have been rather expensive.

I believe their were lutes with 11 strings, as well as the middle eastern "oud", but those are normally fretless.

No amount of googling has give you any clue?

From the look of it, I'd consider rehabbing it for the sheer curiosity and sentimental values alone. This assume it can be made playable without a neck reset. Even at that, it's still a great subject for a wall hanger or a glass case. Whoever visits you in the future, can stand there and wonder about it right along with you...
#3
That's some pretty poor QC, Cranky. The luthier got so drunk he forgot to put the 12 string on!!!
#4
Captaincranky i have googled a bit but nothing exact to it has come. I took it to guitar center and they told me it was real ivory all over it. Thanks for your opinion, i think the same way, of rehabbing it.
#5
Quote by gerardoramos981
Captaincranky i have googled a bit but nothing exact to it has come. I took it to guitar center and they told me it was real ivory all over it. Thanks for your opinion, i think the same way, of rehabbing it.
Best of luck with your project! Do check in from time to time and let us know how it's going.
#6
Quote by TobusRex
That's some pretty poor QC, Cranky. The luthier got so drunk he forgot to put the 12 string on!!!
You're of course joking but, here are some interesting and eccentric (?) guitars with extra strings.

First, Roger McGuinn's "7 string":



A true 11 string, (strings are separate, not in courses of 2) called an "alto guitar":



I think I recall reading something about a 12 string type of guitar, but with the lower E-6 octave string left off. I couldn't find it again, so you'll have to take that FWIW.

He's an 11 string for Tony Done, it's got a sound port! http://www.bartolexusa.com/Alto11/A11c/A11C.html

#7
Captaincranky

That's an interesting variation, having the extra frets on the low strings. The one in the recording sounds OK, I would expect the extra bracing needed for more strings to have an adverse effect on tone. He's obviously a good builder if he's using sound ports.

Coincidentally, I was playing my requinto yesterday, which is the first one on which I tried the sound port idea.
#8
Quote by Tony Done
Captaincranky...[ ]...That's an interesting variation, having the extra frets on the low strings....[ ]...
To the best of my, (admittedly limited), understanding, it's an "alto guitar", not a "harp guitar", which wouldn't have frets under the extra strings. Judging from YouTube, there is music specifically written for this instrument, which is more than likely somehow related to the lute.

Quote by Tony Done
The one in the recording sounds OK, I would expect the extra bracing needed for more strings to have an adverse effect on tone.
Well, the scale is very short, (on the guitar in my ad link), only 550mm (21.5") on the primary 6 strings, plus they're nylon, so not a neck bender by any means.

Quote by Tony Done
He's obviously a good builder if he's using sound ports.
Not to mention being of great taste and distinction...

Quote by Tony Done
Coincidentally, I was playing my requinto yesterday, which is the first one on which I tried the sound port idea.
Yo no lo recuerdo...

This is a Godin, "Glissantar" (11 strings)



Basically an electric oud tuned like guitar. I had thought they left the E-6 octave off with nylon strings so it wouldn't foul the primary string. But Godin himself said in a video it's because player drop tune it while playing, and it would practically be impossible to tune an octave pair that way.

http://www.godinguitars.com/godinglissentarp.htm
Last edited by Captaincranky at Jan 9, 2017,
#9
Captaincranky

You're a devil for punishment. This is the requinto:



22"scale or thereabouts, normally tuned to A standard with thin strings, but I use guitar strings and tune it to G standard.

Godin also do an electric oud:



I think it sounds oud-like in that demo
#10
That electric oud sounds pretty interesting. Wonder what Fahey's Red Pony would sound like on it?
#13
TobusRex "Grandpa Firefly" as you put it, used to be a huge part of Jackson Browne's band.

I've found some great stuff on YouTube with just the two of them playing.









Note that Mr. Lindley goes from slide, to mandolin, to violin, then back to slide
Last edited by Captaincranky at Jan 14, 2017,