#1
Apparently I suck at searching the internet. I can't find anything on HOW the Elixir anti-rust plain steel strings are built. I've found a ton of info on the wound strings, like a video on their process. But with the plain steel strings, I've only found basic information, like them saying it's an "anti-rust coating that's put on the string," but that doesn't really tell me what kind of material is around the string and how they put it on there.

Does anybody know?
#2
Well...like when you go to the car dealer and they charge you extra for rustproofing your car...pretty much the same process, an extra charge for nothing. Stick to cheaper strings, say Ernie Ball or D'Addario and change more often, you'd achieve the same result but won't play the old tired "rust coated" string that you paid double for.
#3
Wash your hands before playing and wipe down the strings after you're done playing? I've been using ernie ball strings for years and haven't had any issue with rusting.
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#4
Quote by diabolical
Well...like when you go to the car dealer and they charge you extra for rustproofing your car...pretty much the same process, an extra charge for nothing. Stick to cheaper strings, say Ernie Ball or D'Addario and change more often, you'd achieve the same result but won't play the old tired "rust coated" string that you paid double for.


That's what I was kinda thinking. If it was actually something really effective, they would go into detail about how they do it. But since they're so vague, it's probably just some bullshit, like something they spray on the strings maybe.

So I think you're right, I'll just change the plain strings more often. Is it not unusual to change the plain steel strings before the wound? I usually change all of them together after a few weeks. But maybe I can change the plain steel strings every week and a half, and the wound strings every three weeks.

The other thing I should point out is that I'm playing a new guitar that has stainless steel frets (Suhr Modern Satin), and I'm wondering if that material is having a different effect on the string wear. The frets feel great, so small price to pay if they do.

Thanks
#7
Quote by diabolical
Well...like when you go to the car dealer and they charge you extra for rustproofing your car...pretty much the same process, an extra charge for nothing. Stick to cheaper strings, say Ernie Ball or D'Addario and change more often, you'd achieve the same result but won't play the old tired "rust coated" string that you paid double for.

Except that, in my experience, elixir's "anti-rust" coating actually works. Paying double for strings isn't such a big deal when you end up changing the regular DR, Ernie Ball, D'addario, GHS etc. strings 20x more frequently than the ones you're paying only 2x as much for, and for me, that isn't an exaggeration. These strings really do save me a measurable amount of money in the long run. YMMV of course

Based on this, I suspect that Elixir are being vague about how they are manufacturing these strings because they haven't been able to get a patent for them, or anything else that might give their product some legal protection that would stop other manufacturers from copying them. Kinda like how some pedal manufacturers seal their circuits in epoxy to stop people from being able to copy them.
Rig Winter 2017:

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Elixir Nanoweb 11-49 strings, Dunlop Jazz III XL picks
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#9
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Polytetrafluoroethylene - that's basically teflon, same coating used on pans

BTW, it is toxic and carcinogenic, you can find data on it. Probably when at higher temp...Whether, healthy or not, if you play and rehearse a lot, long lasting or whatever you call them strings are a complete ripoff as they lose their ring, if you've ever recorded professionally, you'd know. If you're in the studio, for example, strings lose their qualities after 2 sessions, or 2 days tops. If you look at videos of professional players, their techs change their strings daily, before each show, so that should tell you something.

If you're a light player and don't put a lot of work on that certain guitar, it is probably worth it. Personally, I've been through a lot of these high end strings (had an endorsement with certain brands) and see no value in the increased cost. Honestly, the higher end brands with all the magical unicord properties tend to deteriorate just as fast when you're on tour or gigging or recording regularly, and are much harder to find in stores when you need a replacement.

Consulting prices one pack of Elixir Nanoweb strings is close in price to 3 packs of Ernie Ball, if you buy in higher bulk you'd probably get them even cheaper, I think I got the last 10 pack of D'Addario strings that I am currently using for $33 (10 sets).
#10
Thanks guys. I agree with the fact that if I'm recording or giggin, I will put on fresh strings pretty much daily, no matter what kind of strings I'm using, coating or no coating. But the one area where something like "anti-rust" might come in handy is when I'm simply practicing for days or weeks in a row without recording, simply because I hate the feel of rusting plain strings (my slides get slowed down or even caught up). So when I'm practicing for days on end without worrying about recording, I just want the strings to feel slick. It's more of a playability thing, not a tone issue.

Thanks again for all the feedback