#1
What sort of action could one of these achieve?
https://www.amazon.co.uk/Fender-0968609006-Sonoran-Thinline-Electric/dp/B00IBID9KG/ref=sr_1_3?ie=UTF8&qid=1484393988&sr=8-3&keywords=fender+sonoran
I am absolutely loving these really thin acoustics as they are the only types of acoustics to pull me away from solids but I would love to get something that has an action to match.
When the blue light flashes I am kidding.
#3
when you buy any acoustic guitar at any price, there's a good chance you'll have to have the action adjusted.
Quote by Skeet UK
I just looked in my Oxford English Dictionary and under "Acoustic Guitar", there was your Avatar and an email address!
#4
patticake

I think that is true in any price range, but depends to some extent on whether the store does set us as part of their marketing process. - My mate works through his floor stock as he gets the time. I assume that any guitar I buy is going to need a set up, and I don't get discourage by poor feel when trying new (to me) guitars.
#5
Quote by TobusRex
I'd reckon you could set the action however you like.


But can a really low action to match that of a solid actually be achieved bearing in mind that acoustic players seem to like ten or eleven gauge strings - I use nines on mine. There seems to be a theme that acoustics have a higher height action at the 12th fret as a result of string oscillation.
When the blue light flashes I am kidding.
#6
For nylon strings, perhaps, but my steel string guitars have good action at the 12th that I'd put against any electric. About 1/16th on the fat E. That's pretty low I believe by most standards. No fret buzz either (yeah....I admittedly have a great guitar).
#8
Quote by TobusRex
For nylon strings, perhaps, but my steel string guitars have good action at the 12th that I'd put against any electric. About 1/16th on the fat E. That's pretty low I believe by most standards. No fret buzz either (yeah....I admittedly have a great guitar).


So could your standards (1.6mm) be applied to the fender? I thought 2mm was going some for acoustics.
When the blue light flashes I am kidding.
#9
Most acoustics have higher action at the 12th fret than mine. I play a carbon fiber guitar with perfect action up and down the fretboard. It's a better guitar than I am a player, actually, and by a very wide margin.

Helijohn, I'm not a luthier, but from what I understand the action on guitars is pretty much only limited by how much saddle/nut you have to work with, assuming the truss rod is properly set. I'd feel bad if I told you that you could set up a Fender acoustic to 1/16" when it couldn't. Perhaps one of the more experienced guys can help you better?
#12
Quote by TobusRex
Most acoustics have higher action at the 12th fret than mine. I play a carbon fiber guitar with perfect action up and down the fretboard. It's a better guitar than I am a player, actually, and by a very wide margin.

Helijohn, I'm not a luthier, but from what I understand the action on guitars is pretty much only limited by how much saddle/nut you have to work with, assuming the truss rod is properly set. I'd feel bad if I told you that you could set up a Fender acoustic to 1/16" when it couldn't. Perhaps one of the more experienced guys can help you better?


I'll check my tele later and see what height I have it set at so I know what I would be aiming for. I think it's about 1/16" (1.6mm). The sonoran is to me an expensive guitar so it's why I'd need to know what it can achieve.
When the blue light flashes I am kidding.
#13
Quote by Tony Done
helijohn

I have found that the common standard of 4/64" treble and 6/64" bass works well for me, using medium strings.


I recently got a cheap thinline and with fettling the bridge saddle and so on I set the height to 2mm (5/64) on the sixth at the 12th fret. I accept this one's limitations as it was not a costly guitar that won't get significantly below that height and while playable I find the action feels higher than I am used to. It's OK - I just notice it. I am using 0.010" gauge strings.

But I am so liking it that I'd love to splash out on something better soon and the sonoran is one of the few slim guitars I have found without paying a fortune.
When the blue light flashes I am kidding.
#14
Quote by helijohn
What sort of action could one of these achieve?....[ ]...I am absolutely loving these really thin acoustics as they are the only types of acoustics to pull me away from solids but I would love to get something that has an action to match.
you're simply not going to achieve the same type of action with any acoustic as you can with an electric. A set of electric .010's has a little over 100Lbs of tension. The strings a Sonoran ships with are like "acoustic lights", .012 to .053 with about 165 lbs. of tension. Yes, you can go lighter, but you give away some bass and punch when you do.

I get turned off with any "thinline acoustic", that Fender being no exception. I will grant you they do have their uses, and if you're an "always plugs it in anyway", kind of guy, it likely won't matter all that much. But, expect the unplugged performance to be lacking as opposed any full depth dreadnought.

I own a standard depth Sonoran, and it's OK and plays decently. I string it with "custom lights{", (.011 to .052).

I don't think a Sonoran is the "best bang for your buck", even within the Fender acoustic line itself. You are paying for the kitsch factor of the Strat head stock and maple neck. I got mine for about $330.00 (left handed new), right before Fender handed down a pretty substantial price hike. I think MAP on the Sonoran is about $450.ATM (I'm talking the LH model, a righty would be about maybe (?) 50 bucks cheaper).
Last edited by Captaincranky at Jan 15, 2017,
#15
Quote by Tony Done
helijohn

I have found that the common standard of 4/64" treble and 6/64" bass works well for me, using medium strings.

I have just checked and with nines I have a tad over 1.1mm give or take a tiny amount on the sixth at the 12th on my tele - we are talking thous now 0.045" - slightly less than 3/64". It's a feeler gauge situation.
I don't expect to achieve that on an acoustic but as I get nearer to 2mm I notice it.
When the blue light flashes I am kidding.
#16
Quote by Captaincranky
you're simply not going to achieve the same type of action with any acoustic as you can with an electric.

I own a standard depth Sonoran, and it's OK and plays decently. I string it with "custom lights{", (.011 to .052).

I don't think a Sonoran is the "best bang for your buck", even within the Fender acoustic line itself.


It's part of the reason why I don't like acoustics as well as the bulk.

This is what I wondered about - hearing from an owner is interesting. Getting a thinline type is a bit like looking for a needle in a haystack. I have a very old Eko Jumbo that I had from new and have never used it almost literally.

Question is what to get. I wanted something I could just pick up and play while watching TV or something without having to go to the trouble of plugging in so I have my thinline cheapie which is fine for that apart from wishing it had a better action. I expect I'll try acoustic nine gauge strings on it eventually.

It was just that I was wondering if there was something better and worth paying for. I also don't seem to get on with semi acoustics probably because being electric I always feel obliged to plug it in and then end up playing the others.
When the blue light flashes I am kidding.
#17
Quote by helijohn
It's part of the reason why I don't like acoustics as well as the bulk.

This is what I wondered about - hearing from an owner is interesting. Getting a thinline type is a bit like looking for a needle in a haystack. I have a very old Eko Jumbo that I had from new and have never used it almost literally.
Well, we're different people. I don't find the size of a jumbo uncomfortable, BUT, I'm never standing up playing one. For me, I might consider a thinline guitar for use on stage. (Although I have to say, I pretty much missed the boat on that anyway)
Quote by helijohn
It was just that I was wondering if there was something better and worth paying for. I also don't seem to get on with semi acoustics probably because being electric I always feel obliged to plug it in and then end up playing the others.
Actually the Sonoran should be decent when compared to other offerings at around the same price. Ibanez make its "AEL-10" in a thinline. I'm reasonably sure the Fender is better than one of those. Yamaha has (I think), a thinline in its APX series, which is probably all laminate. Then Ovation has some thin bowl offerings. Love 'em, hate 'em, everybody has an opinion, but they're there. I don't think they'de be good for sitting around playing on the couch, but not for the "they slide off your lap dogma". You can't feel or hear what an Ovation is doing while you're playing it, as you can with an all wood guitar. (Which BTW, will also slide off your lap if you don't have a footstool four you right leg).

"I don't like acoustic guitars but I want to buy one, and string it with nines to try and make it an electric", has a certain silliness factor about it. I can understand it to the extent that you can play and practice electric stuff with a rig like that. However, if you want to bang on cowboy chords and project, you'll find that setup lacking. I'm just trying to help you understand what you're getting into. FWIW, I probably would be banging on the Eko jumbo if it were mine. Well, it's like they say," different strokes" and all that. Let us know what you decide..
Last edited by Captaincranky at Jan 15, 2017,
#18
Quote by Captaincranky

"I don't like acoustic guitars but I want to buy one, and string it with nines to try and make it an electric", has a certain silliness factor about it. I can understand it to the extent that you can play and practice electric stuff with a rig like that. However, if you want to bang on cowboy chords and project, you'll find that setup lacking. I'm just trying to help you understand what you're getting into. FWIW, I probably would be banging on the Eko jumbo if it were mine. Well, it's like they say," different strokes" and all that. Let us know what you decide..


+1, daft, IMO.
#19
Quote by Tony Done

"I don't like acoustic guitars but I want to buy one, and string it with nines to try and make it an electric",


Ooops, did I say that, I didn't mean to. It's not what I meant.

My problem is I was wanting to know if there is a slim acoustic out there which handles as well as a solid on the fretboard and basically wondered if paying a lot of money would get me that.

With regard to 0.009" strings it's the same issue as I don't need volume coming from the acoustic. I suppose a better way to look at this is to think of the acoustic for me as being there to keep my 'eye in' otherwise the days slip by with no playing done at all especially as I am switching all the time from guitar to banjo.
When the blue light flashes I am kidding.
#20
helijohn

After giving this matter a bit of thought, I'm kind of thinking you might also consider a a semi-hollow electric, such as an Epiphone, "Dot", "Casino", or "Sheraton". Basically anything in the Gibson ES-335 design family. Although, I believe the Casino doesn't have a tone block inside. If that is indeed the case, that would be "the most acoustic", of any of the guitars I just mentioned. All of those would play "like an electric" but have more of an acoustic sound. None of them would be as far removed from your comfort zone as any acoustic.
#21
Quote by Captaincranky
helijohn

After giving this matter a bit of thought, I'm kind of thinking you might also consider a a semi-hollow electric,


It's a good idea. I was actually brought up on Chuck Berry and Bo Diddley music so I have owned a dot and a few others because of this. Though not so slim I recently sold my Rally Big Apple. In my avatar it is a Hofner Committee Verithin, the pic was taken around 1965. Every now and then I have given semis of one sort or another a try and then lost interest............hence my present thinline which is a cheapie experiment but the difference is that I have broken away from my usual semi acoustics..............I expected to be disappointed with this especially as my Eko jumbo has always put me off regular acoustics. But I have taken to this little cheapie like a duck to water. I love it.

I actually started this thread because I like my thinline so much I began to wonder if I should have bought something more expensive.
When the blue light flashes I am kidding.
#22
helijohn

Well, with apologies to Malthus for the paraphrase, I suppose, "there's no starting an idea whose time has long past".

I don't pay all that much attention to really high end acoustics, and certainly less to thin line models, as I have it stuck in my head they're a live performance tool.

I have seen high profile acts with custom made thin line guitars. I think Emmy Lou Harris had a slimmed doen Gibson J-160 or 200 built for her. The strangest one I ever saw was John Denver with an enormous Guild jumbo 12 string, slimmed down to about 3" or so. Well, perhaps stranger still is Ian Anderson's new stage acoustic, which isn't a whole hell of a lot bigger than a viola.

Here's Denver playing that guitar: (Note that lower bout is probably close to a foot and a half across)!



Well, perhaps stranger still is Ian Anderson's new stage acoustic, which isn't a whole hell of a lot bigger than a viola.



Given you admitted waxing and waning of interest in musical toys, if you like the Fender, you should stick with it, until your guitar wanderlust demands you do otherwise...
Last edited by Captaincranky at Jan 17, 2017,
#23
Quote by Captaincranky
[

Given you admitted waxing and waning of interest in musical toys, if you like the Fender, you should stick with it, until your guitar wanderlust demands you do otherwise...

Big bout looks so wrong.
I love that uke looking kit but it's not for me.
Yes, sticking to where I am sure seems a good plan. Still...............I can't help myself.
When the blue light flashes I am kidding.
#25
TobusRex

That's Ian Anderson, who gets mistaken for "Jethro Tull" all the time. He formed Tull, and has fronted them from the beginning,, and I believe, still does. He always did go in for a tinkley guitar sound, it made a great prelude for the bombast which was sure to follow.

Here's probably their most famous track, "Aqualung", which he gives credit to his ex wife for penning the lyrics:



Here's the lyrics to the song, just so you can gauge the general overall depravity of it:


R1 Bb C D R2
Sitting on a park bench, eyeing little girls with bad intent
R1 Bb C D R2
Snot is running down his nose, greasy fingers smearing shabby clothes, aqualung
R1 Bb C D R2
Drying in the cold sun, watching as the frilly panties run, aqualung
R1 Bb C D R2
Feeling like a dead duck, spitting out pieces of his broken luck, Whoa, aqualung

Em D A Am Em D Dsus2 D
Sun streaking cold, an old man wondering lonely, taking time the only way he knows
Em D A Am Em D Dsus2 D
Leg hurting bad, as he bends to pick a dog-end, he goes down to the bog and warms his feet
Em D A Am Em D Dsus2 D
Feeling alone, the army's up the road, salvation al-a-mode and a cup of tea
Em D A Am Em D Dsus2 D
Aqualung my friend, don't you start away uneasy, you poor old sod you see it's only me


Em D Em
Do you still remember, December's foggy freeze?
Em D Em
When the ice that clings on to your beard, was screaming agony
Em D A
And you snatch your rattling last breathes, with deep-sea-diver-sounds
Am Em D Dsus2 D
And the flowers bloomed like madness in the spring


The chord tab page:

https://tabs.ultimate-guitar.com/j/jethro_tull/aqualung_crd.htm
Last edited by Captaincranky at Jan 17, 2017,