#1
Checked it using two tuners, I've adjusted it to where the saddle is all the way back, harmonic on 12th is still sharp. Not a real heavy gauge .09 Any ideas, please advise.
#2
The 12th fret harmonic should show exactly the same pitch as the open string, I sometimes use that harmonic rather than the open string for tuning, depending on the tuner. It is the fretted note that might be sharp or flat relative to the open string or harmonic. If the fretted note is sharp, then the saddle needs moving further back - you can remove the spring to win more space on a strat-style bridge if you have to.
Last edited by Tony Done at Jan 15, 2017,
#3
If you're all the way back you might be SOL. I really don't know of an easy solution.
#4
Well, here's my problem and it seems to only be happening with the low E and A (5th and 6th strings). After making sure the 12th fretted note is the same as the 12th fret harmonic, it still isn't right. To then correct the issue I have to tune both A and E roughly a quarter to half step higher, BUT that only helps with the power chords played closer to the nut, anything higher than the 9th fret seems to sound wrong (Wowwowwow). Any help or advise would certainly be appreciated.

Thanks a million
Robin
#6
rbuddi422

If "(Wowwowwow)" is the sound of the string, there may be too little distance between the string and the pickup. See if lowering the pickup makes that go away.
Quote by reverb66
I'm pretty sure the Bible requires that you play through a tube amp in Texas.
#7
The wowowowowow sound I get is very similar that off sound you hear when tuning using harmonics at E 5th fret and A 7th fret/ A 5th D 7th/ ect.

I might be able to simplify this, Okay if playing "the power chord" with E and A at the 7th and 9th fret and it's slightly off BUT by holding the note and kinda pulling the E string toward the bridge or toward the bolt, if the chord gets closer to sounding correct, then what does this mean for adjusting. I'm grasping straws here

PsimonR - How do I check with tape measure?
#9
It's not possible for the harmonic to be out of tune with the open string, unless there is something wrong with the string. The harmonic is, by the laws of physics, exactly one octave above the open string.

And how old are these strings? If you're getting beating (wowowowowow noise) from an individual string, that means it's got kinks or a ton of gunk on it. That can only happen if something impedes the string's vibration and creates a harmonic node that's out of tune with the string. Rust and gunk can also affect intonation because they dampen the string's vibration, effectively slowing it down.

The guitar should come to proper intonation without extreme adjustment. Chances are it's some other factor such as old strings, a poorly adjusted neck, sympathetic vibration from other strings (or possibly bridge springs), or just fretting too hard when you check.

edit: also when you're tuning, you shouldn't get any beating. Beating means you're out of tune. The beats are literally just the difference between one string's frequency and the other's. If one string is ringing at 440 Hz and the other is at 435, you're going to hear beating at 5 Hz. That is, 5 "wows" per second.
Last edited by cdgraves at Feb 19, 2017,
#10
Quote by cdgraves
That can only happen if something impedes the string's vibration and creates a harmonic node that's out of tune with the string.


That is why I asked him to see how close the strings are to the pickup magnets... they can do that to the string. Easy to check by lowering the pickup.

He needs to put on new strings and lower the pickups to eliminate some likely causes. Then use a correct tuning and intonation method.
Quote by reverb66
I'm pretty sure the Bible requires that you play through a tube amp in Texas.