#1
I am new to recording hence the title, but i have a bunch of questions that i don't want to keep track of on multiple different things so i guess i'll just smash them all together.

1.What kind of microphone do you recommend for recording both guitar and bass amps (less than 50$) the bass amp is an acoustic b100 and the guitar amp a line 6 combo of some sorts (i know i'm sorry, it's a line 6 but for my budget it's all i could find unless you can point me out to something better)

2.What are audio interfaces and why do i need them

3.What software should i use to mix (got to be free, I am on a tight budget)

4.With that software could i make it to where i can have one track for the right ear and another for the left while also being able to have a single track go across both. (idk the technical words for it)


Thanks for taking the time to read my questions and hopefully have some input.
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#2
1) I'm not going to lie, $50 isn't much to work with. An interface + microphone can run from anywheres between $100 and $5000, depending on what you need. I've done a bit of research and think that the best bet here is the PreSonus AudioBox USB 2x2:

http://www.musiciansfriend.com/pro-audio/presonus-audiobox-usb-2x2-audio-recording-interface-limited-edition

This comes with Studio One Artist, which is a fantastic DAW. I've used SO and it's quite nice.

I've read about this mic being used as a guitar amp mic:

http://www.musiciansfriend.com/pro-audio/cad-tsm411-supercardioid-dynamic-microphone

And most reviews agree with my local rumblings and experiences on stage with newer guys. Not the be-all end-all but usable. Alternatively, you could scour about your local pawn shops and used stores for an SM-57.

From there get a set of decent headphones and go to town.

2) An audio interface is an external sound card that allows one, two, or multiple, inputs and outputs to your computer. This will encompass a number of microphone pre-amps as well as the Analogue-to-Digital conversion and most often monitoring facilities (headphone amp and level, master output level). They also provide this in-out at low latency to allow multi-track recording. Without low latency audio streams you will notice a delay between playing a sound and hearing from your recording software (DAW) that is unusable to record multiple layered tracks.

3) Most interfaces are bundled with a light version of a major 3rd party DAW, or a proprietary DAW that only come with that company's interface.

4) Your DAW will include the ability to pan a tracks across the stereo sound field as a default.
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#3
Read the manual of your amp. Some modelling amps have USB outputs that can be used as an interface, no idea if that counts for yours though.

Failing that, go here:
https://www.ultimate-guitar.com/forum/showthread.php?t=1658707

Read it all, but on your budget you're probably going to have to go with the Guitar Link. It's not great, but it'll get you going.
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#4
cliffburtoncopy +1 to what everyone has said. Read the Intro to Recording Sticky.

$50 is not much to work with and really, if you do not want to have to buy anything sooner than later, I would suggest to bump your budget up some (~$170 USD) for a proper audio interface and mic + an XLR cable. The guitar links work but they are not great. For bass you can probably just plug in direct to the interface and use an amp sim later on, recording bass through a mic (especially something like an SM57) will probably end up cutting much of the actual bass frequencies. For guitar, the SM57 is the industry standard. You can find them used for solid prices.

My general recommendation for an interface is the Mackie Onyx Blackjack, or a Focusrite Scarlett.
#5
1.What kind of microphone do you recommend for recording both guitar and bass amps (less than 50$) the bass amp is an acoustic b100 and the guitar amp a line 6 combo of some sorts (i know i'm sorry, it's a line 6 but for my budget it's all i could find unless you can point me out to something better)

If you can't afford an SM57 then any reasonable, cheap dynamic vocal mic should do the job for guitar recording. Try a Behringer XM8500; the quality of this mic is probably about similar to the Line6 (- which are no where near as shit as people on here say).
For Bass you would be better of direct injecting it. Plug is straight in.


2.What are audio interfaces and why do i need them

You can plug a mic into the mic (or headset) socket on your computer (if it has a 4 way socket for a headset you will need an adaptor, if they are separate then just a 3.5mm to 1/4 inch lead). If you do this the quality will never be as good as an interface, Interfaces are to give you CD (or better) quality recordings.

3.What software should i use to mix (got to be free, I am on a tight budget)

Reaper (or, if you really can't afford the $60 for it and are not willing to just use it for free, Garage Band)

4.With that software could i make it to where i can have one track for the right ear and another for the left while also being able to have a single track go across both. (idk the technical words for it)

Yes, any DAW can do anything like this.
#6
For a super tight budget, consider finding a decent mic that will work with your phone or tablet and find a compatible recording app to get used to the process and develop your skills. Using an irig or similar device for inputs, no mic or amps are needed because you can get great results by recording direct. No sense in spending a bunch of $$ now for gear you have not learned how to use. Pretty excellent stuff can be recorded on a phone with a little skill.

"Your sound is in your hands as much as anything. It's the way you pick, and the way you hold the guitar, more than it is the amp or the guitar you use." -- Stevie Ray Vaughan

"Anybody can play. The note is only 20 percent. The attitude of the motherfucker who plays it is 80 percent." -- Miles Davis

Guthrie on tone: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zmohdG9lLqY
Last edited by Cajundaddy at Jan 17, 2017,
#7
It'll go a bit beyond your budget, but not much... and if you just want to do guitar and bass, consider getting an iRig and getting JamUp app for the iPad/iPhone.

The free version of JamUp includes a few basic amps, tuner, and some other cool tools (tempo and pitch shifter, etc.). The extra amp models are in-app purchases, but the entire suite is about $35. I love it. I use it live and no longer use an actual amp. I use it here in the studio too, depending on the project.

CT
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I know it sounds crazy, but try to learn to inhale your voice. www.thebelcantotechnique.com

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#8
thanks for all the comments, i only expected tops 1 guy but this is cool. After all these comments i've decided on a used sm57 and a used Presonus audiobox usb interface, and i have just one more question. a couple people were saying i should plug the bass directly into the interface and use a simulator, but idk how i would do that anyone to explain? sorry for all the questions haha thanks again.
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#10
Most of us record bass direct because it is easier to get great tone that way. Lots of compression, EQ, and I sometimes use a tone patch like "Ampeg SVT" or something to get the shape and punch we want. It depends on what is available with your software.
"Your sound is in your hands as much as anything. It's the way you pick, and the way you hold the guitar, more than it is the amp or the guitar you use." -- Stevie Ray Vaughan

"Anybody can play. The note is only 20 percent. The attitude of the motherfucker who plays it is 80 percent." -- Miles Davis

Guthrie on tone: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zmohdG9lLqY
Last edited by Cajundaddy at Jan 17, 2017,