#1
Hello all, I've been taking private guitar lessons for almost two years now and am quite happy with the knowledge I've gained. My playing has sort of plateaued but I'm certain with the right approach I can easily break that barrier. Usually my week to week routine looks like this.

-I'll go to my lesson every Tuesday

-Learn a music theory concept and or work on a previous concept or composition

-Not touch my guitar for the rest of that day (usually not intentional)

-Every other day of the week I might do a chops exercise for 2-5 minutes at time, sight-read, improvise to a backing track, noodle, or some combination of those.

I have a binder full of everything I've learned since I've started including but not limited to scales, chord vocabulary, functional harmony concepts such as secondary dominants, scale degrees, circle of fifths worksheets, classical pieces which I perform harmonic analysis on, and so on ETC.

So basically if you can get the idea, I have so much I've learned it's almost impossible to practice it all in a single day without burning myself out mentally. My drive to sit there for at least an hour and practice in the first place is also an issue for me. Usually my approach has been to take these things in small doses as I progress to my next lesson. However, I'm getting into composing my own material and since I haven't really applied most of the information I've learned such as common chord modulation, and familiarizing myself with chords in each major and minor key family, I'm kind of falling behind.

What should I focus on as far as a daily practice routine on things that absolutely every guitar player should tackle day to day?

Obviously chops work is a given, but aside from that what else?
Last edited by anthonymarisc at Jan 18, 2017,
#2
How is your repertoire? Can you play a lot of songs, if you go to a band audition and they ask you to play some popular song, is there a good chance you'd know how to play that song? That's one of the key things that in my opinion is missing from your routine, actually learning songs and expanding your own personal library of pieces you can perform well. Learning songs also helps a lot with composing, you can see for yourself how things like harmony, melody, rhythm and song structure work in context.

Quote by anthonymarisc
What should I focus on as far as a daily practice routine on things that absolutely every guitar player should tackle day to day??


Ear training. Learn music by ear, and learn to recognize intervals and chords by ear. It's an indispensable skill for any musician and one of the most important tools you can have, that sadly gets often overlooked. Ear training will help you immensely in improvisation and composing, as your ears are the judge of what sounds good and what doesn't.

Those are two things that I would include. You can also ask your teacher for opinions on this, that is what teachers are for.
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#3
Quote by Kevätuhri
How is your repertoire? Can you play a lot of songs, if you go to a band audition and they ask you to play some popular song, is there a good chance you'd know how to play that song? That's one of the key things that in my opinion is missing from your routine, actually learning songs and expanding your own personal library of pieces you can perform well. Learning songs also helps a lot with composing, you can see for yourself how things like harmony, melody, rhythm and song structure work in context.


Ear training. Learn music by ear, and learn to recognize intervals and chords by ear. It's an indispensable skill for any musician and one of the most important tools you can have, that sadly gets often overlooked. Ear training will help you immensely in improvisation and composing, as your ears are the judge of what sounds good and what doesn't.

Those are two things that I would include. You can also ask your teacher for opinions on this, that is what teachers are for.


Hmmmm to be honest not really, I know sections, riffs, and pieces of solos to certain songs. Though not many songs in their entirety, my ear training could use some work as well I can recognize the distance of intervals from a given root and can identify major/minor/augmented/diminished sounds but that's about it.