#1
I've raised the action as high as it'll go but the action is still so low that towards the end of the neck the strings are literally touching the fingerboard, is there any other way to raise the action? Also worth mentioning that the B string isn't as high as possible because the key just spins in the screw (used bass, came like this)
#2
Is the neck screwed into the body at the correct angle? Loosen off the strings and take off the neck and see if there's any shims or spacers in the neck pocket and remove them.

Ideally, if you lay a long straight edge down the guitar's fretboard towards the bridge, the end of the straight edge should meet up at the bridge at the exact same height with the bridge set to its lowest action possible. It doesn't necessarily have to be to work fine, but that's the ideal if you want your bridge to have maximum action adjustability.
Quote by Axelfox
Reeeeeeeeeeeeeeee
#4
It could be that the nut slots are too deep for the strings that you are using. Check to see how deep the strings sit in them.
"Maybe this world is another planet's hell?" - Aldous Huxley
#5
In order...

Look along the neck and see if it's twisted; if it is then there's a problem!

Whilst looking, if the frets themselves are uneven, then they need sorting out.

Next, put a capo on the 1st fret and press a string against the highest fret, there should be something like a credit card gap between string and neck at the 12th; if there is no gap then the truss rod needs loosening, whereas if there's too big a gap then it needs tightening. (If it's a really big gap then there could be a problem!)

If it is a bolt-on neck then you can take off the strings and take off the neck (be sure to use an exact fitting screwdriver or you'll mash the screw heads) and see if there are any shims there (shims are pieces of card/wood/whatever which are put at one end of the neck pocket to slightly change the angle of the neck to the body when it's all tightened up again); if there's one at the body-end of the pocket then try taking it out and see how that goes.

Finally get to the bridge height adjustment...
#8
PurpleMoon
That's what the truss rod is for - tightening it bends the neck backwards, to oppose the pull of the strings, whereas loosening it allows it to relax forwards with the pull of the strings.

If it's really pronounced, then it seems strange; perhaps it's been left with no strings on it, perhaps it was set up for heavy strings and it's been changed to lighter ones, or perhaps it's been over-tightened.

If you're not confident of doing it yourself, a guitar specialist might charge you £30 or so for a setup.

With my instruments I happily mess about with the cheapies, but for my more expensive ones I'll go to a professional.
#9
Unless the neck is terminally distorted prowla is right, it's a simple truss rod adjustment. A credit card movement is a bit much though, I'd think more in terms of a guitar pick, it does depend upon the bass though a little.

your problem will be if the truss rod hasn't been adjusted for a while, it gets sticky and easy to damage the allen socket or screw thread. I'd go and get a pro to do it first time, my local guy only charges £15 so you might be lucky, They'll also adjust the action and intonation and check out any other problems. Your bass will then play much better, it'll feel like a new instrument.

Meanwhile go on Youtube where there are loads of videos telling you how to do this yourself. It's a simple DIY job if all the various screw threads are running freely.
#10
Quote by Phil Starr
Unless the neck is terminally distorted prowla is right, it's a simple truss rod adjustment. A credit card movement is a bit much though, I'd think more in terms of a guitar pick, it does depend upon the bass though a little.

your problem will be if the truss rod hasn't been adjusted for a while, it gets sticky and easy to damage the allen socket or screw thread. I'd go and get a pro to do it first time, my local guy only charges £15 so you might be lucky, They'll also adjust the action and intonation and check out any other problems. Your bass will then play much better, it'll feel like a new instrument.

Meanwhile go on Youtube where there are loads of videos telling you how to do this yourself. It's a simple DIY job if all the various screw threads are running freely.
(I just checked and my plectrum is thicker than my credit card!) :-)
#11
prowla ha ha, I don't use a pick on bass so mine is a 0.7, my cards aren't all the same thickness so I guess you were right. I aim for about a 0.4-0.6mm relief on my necks. It depends upon which bass and which strings I'm using. Floppy strings need a bigger relief. In practice I set them up by eye then adjust the action/bridge height and check for buzzing, maybe tweek the relief a little and then the action. I know one of my basses (Fender Highway One) doesn't have the frets completely level so it buzzes on the final fret if the relief isn't slightly higher than the rest of my basses. Must fix that I suppose for the OP it isn't an exact science, just a matter of practicality, if he can afford it I suggest he asks a pro to set it up for him the first time and ask if he can watch it being done.
#12
I use the EB purple picks for guitar and bass, or fingers if I feel like it, whichever suits. But right now my right index fingertip has split with the cold and it's painful!

I guess the difference between a card or a pick is not the primary concern if the neck is bending the wrong way! :-)
#17
Quote by prowla
On a good bass, I like a hint of buzz on every fret!


Then you need a Pedulla Buzz Bass!

"Maybe this world is another planet's hell?" - Aldous Huxley
#18
PurpleMoon
Quote by PurpleMoon
mobidguitar that will only remove the force pulling it back, it won't do anything to bend it forward again

You've probably had a chance to think it through since posting this particular comment and realized that the string tension will pull it forward once you alleviate the force that is pulling it back. Now all you need to do is find a #3 Allen wrench (plus a small phillips head screwdriver to remove the truss rod cover) and a couple minutes of free time. A few counter-clockwise turns of the truss rod and you will know immediately whether or not that was your problem. It'll take you longer to get the cover off then to make the adjustment. The truss rod is an widely misunderstood component of guitars and basses, but you're not going to hurt anything.