#1
That title is one of my favorite quotes and Ozzy Osborne lyrics by the way! So, I'm new 'round here but not to guitar. I've playing country and finger style guitar since I was about 12 years old and have never had any formal training. Just friends, family and a lot of tabs and YouTube since the internet has become such a huge tool in the last 15 years or so. I'd call my skill level on some aspects of the guitar to be intermediate to advanced. However, this brings me to why I'm here and my problem.

I'm ashamed to admit that when it comes to the fundamentals of guitar, I'm nothing like I should be (hence the quote about walking before I ran). I simply never learned the proper way. I don't have a full knowledge of the basics like all the chords, chord positions and names, scales or any of the really important stuff that makes for a good guitar player. However, if you give me a tab and about a week there really is no solo or finger style arrangement I can't learn. I'm totally working backwards at this point. I guess it's because I'm a fast learner and I can pick that stuff up.

Which brings me to the point; I'm tired of this and I want to become the guitar player I always wanted to be. I want to start back at square one and really learn the stuff I need, like understanding how to improv anywhere on the fretboard for any song using scales, the theory behind how guitar players can jam in any position and just everything I should have learned from the ground up years ago. But I don't know where to start. I don't want to go through things that are too simplistic and waste time, but I do need a crash course in the fundamentals.

I've looked online for guitar courses that have structured curriculum and training courses, but not found anything that is truly appealing that I feel will get me where I need to be. I even thought about taking online courses at the University of Berkeley music department, but a year costs around $4,0000 and I truly believe I can educate myself if I just had the right direction/tools.

Can anyone give me a good jumping off point where I can get started with my re-education (preferably something that has a clear path of progression and goals)?
#2
Perhaps due to your current skill level, you feel like the beginner stuff is inadequate for you, but in reality, it might be a great starting point to push you in the direction you want. Or maybe you already know this stuff and you just don't know it or need that push.
#3
Perhaps you would consider a guitar tutor who can go through all the fundamentals that you're missing, but without forcing you to learn techniques you already know?

Other than that, you could dedicate yourself to each individual area that you feel you need to learn and teach yourself with any online resources you can find. Considering that you can already play well it probably wouldn't take you too long to learn. There are plenty of books for chord progressions, scales and music theory if you wanted to take this route.

You're probably not going to learn to improvise from a book or online course, but playing over backing tracks will help you to experiment with the chords and scales that you will be learning.
Last edited by V3n0m777 at Jan 19, 2017,
#4
don't they have that video game where u can plug your guitar into the thing and learn guitar?
"ba doo doo ba doo doo ba doo daa"
- earth,wind, and fire
#5
Quote by drive_sw

I don't have a full knowledge of the basics like all the chords, chord positions and names, scales or any of the really important stuff that makes for a good guitar player.

That's all just music theory, which is something that I recommend learning, but at the end of the day it's not actually a requirement for being a good guitarist.

Quote by drive_sw
However, if you give me a tab and about a week there really is no solo or finger style arrangement I can't learn.

No solo you can't learn? I'd like to test that theory.

Quote by drive_sw
Which brings me to the point; I'm tired of this and I want to become the guitar player I always wanted to be. I want to start back at square one and really learn the stuff I need, like understanding how to improv anywhere on the fretboard for any song using scales, the theory behind how guitar players can jam in any position and just everything I should have learned from the ground up years ago. But I don't know where to start.

1. Get a teacher. Nothing will help any musician more than 1-on-1 sessions with someone who knows their instrument and can convey their knowledge efficiently. Many teachers do teach music theory, but some do not. So look into that too.
2. If lessons aren't an option for whatever reason, I suggest starting at www.musictheory.net . It's a great resource to help you learn the fundamentals of music and how it works. Also, you should learn the notes of the fretboard. A free PC program called "Fretboard Warrior" can help you with that.

Quote by hecks
don't they have that video game where u can plug your guitar into the thing and learn guitar?

Yeah, Rocksmith. In my experience it's a decent way to learn songs, but it's not really a good way to actually learn guitar.
Quote by Geldin
Junior's usually at least a little terse, but he knows his stuff. I've always read his posts in a grouchy grandfather voice, a grouchy grandfather with a huge stiffy for alternate picking.
Besides that, he's right this time. As usual.
#6
However, if you give me a tab and about a week there really is no solo or finger style arrangement I can't learn.


Godless Times by Rings of Saturn. The "official" tab by the artists is all over the internet, as well as a playthrough on youtube. Do itttt!!!

But nah, I know what you mean. I had the same problem, so I went and learned a bunch of theory and scales and stuff, and it didn't make a difference. I still write music the same. It does help when you're learning new songs though. Gets you accustomed to utilizing the whole neck instead of staying in a box.
#7
1) learn the C major scale
2) learn the harmonized c major scale in triads
3) learn how intervals are named in relation to the major scale ( i.e learn what a 3rd or 4th or flat 5th is)
4) learn how chords are named from the major scale intervals ( cmajor 7 has the 7th etc.) Learn the cmajor scale harmonized with 7th chords.
5) learn how progressions are named with roman numerals ( learn what a II,V,I is) using the major scale degrees.
6) learn the A minor scale - learn why it's called the relative minor scale of C major.

It all starts there. You can google any of these things and some site will explain it. Each of these steps should take a lot of time.

If you have a lot of experience playing, then these things will be like putting names to the faces - you already know a lot of this instinctively, but it will help organize things for you.
Last edited by reverb66 at Jan 25, 2017,
#8
You need to learn theory. How chords are constructed, how chords fit into a scale, voice leading, playing chords as arpeggios, building chords around the neck. Plenty to work on. Look into intervals, everything in music is built on intervals (the C major chord, for example, is the 1, 3, and 5 notes of the scale). You sound like you have good technique, so it shouldn't take you too long to get to the point where you are having some fun with this.