#1
I'd decided to get back into playing and bought a brand new Epiphone G400 about a month ago. Felt great, loved the faded red. Replaced the store strings right away with Daddario lights. Reset intonation. Stretched multiple times. Played every night. It will not stay in tune. I don't mean day to day either. It goes in and out of tune while I play. I have: tightened the tuner handle screws (a little better --Grover tuners btw), installed a Graphtech nut (again, a little better), removed the bridge and discovered that the saddles have a lot of forward-backward play -- I replaced the wire with e-clips and actually put some springs on the screws to hold the saddles in place (again, a little better). I can almost play asong now without it changing tune. My question is, has anyone found the chinese epiphone to have sloppy bridge saddles? I have my eye on a roller bridge with locking saddles. - my last effort to fix this. The real sucks is that I have an $80 Squier Strat has had nothing but strings and an intonation set, and it stays in tune for days! Thanks for input.
#2
Most tuning problems happen at the nut. The slots may not be wide enough, might have sharp edges, or there may be other things catching the string. Try running some fine sandpaper (600 grit) through them and lubricate them (pencil lead, chapstick...). The second most common problem is how the string is wound around the tuner post. There are several ways to string your guitar, but this is the method I use, and is probably the best way to assure the string doesn't slip on the post. http://guitartreats.com/2011/08/how-to-restring-a-guitar.html

It could be your bridge saddles... I would run some fine sandpaper through the notches. Very unlikely that the tuners are at fault.
#4
Quote by stormin1155
Most tuning problems happen at the nut. The slots may not be wide enough, might have sharp edges, or there may be other things catching the string. Try running some fine sandpaper (600 grit) through them and lubricate them (pencil lead, chapstick...). The second most common problem is how the string is wound around the tuner post. There are several ways to string your guitar, but this is the method I use, and is probably the best way to assure the string doesn't slip on the post. http://guitartreats.com/2011/08/how-to-restring-a-guitar.html

It could be your bridge saddles... I would run some fine sandpaper through the notches. Very unlikely that the tuners are at fault.

+1 Good suggestions.

I've found getting a set of welding torch tip cleaners to be really useful. You can get a set of them for >$5 and they're essentially a dozen tiny little needle files that are near perfectly sized for refining the width of the nut slots to keep binding at the nut to a minimum. Writing a pencil into the nut slots helps too.
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I also have to do that. Cottaging this weekend