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#121
LazyUsername Believe it or not, it's the side shape which gives the dreadnought i characteristic bass peak. Larger guitars, which have a waisted design, go down deeper, but lack that mid bass "boom". So, IMO the cutaway does have an very slight effect on the sound, but not enough to turn someone away from buying a guitar without one.

If I were you, I'd also have a look at what Taylor calls a "Grand Auditorium" body, which is just a bit bigger than the old standard "concert" size.They carry a xx4 in the model number (IE 114). E= electric C =cutaway

Many people who finger pick exclusive, opt for the smaller "Orchestra" size. These are bright and responsive, but do lack some deep bass.
Last edited by Captaincranky at Sep 20, 2017,
#122
Down to 3 choices of AE guitars.  Which would be the best in your opinion?

Fender T Bucket 300CE

Epiphone Hummingbird Pro

Dean Exotica Quilt Ash AE

Don't want to make a bad purchase.  HELP!
#123
jasonwomble86 Anything but that Dean! Please, not the Dean. Ash, Maple, Birch, any of those truly dense hardwoods aren't worth a crap for a guitar top. The fact that they're laminated, (IMO), only makes it worse.

However, Dean was pushing the "Aphex Aural Exciter" system in those guitars. If you're going to play plugged all the time, or perform, it would be worthwhile to at least listen to the effect through a decent amp before you make up your mind.

Ibanez "Exotic Wood Series", carries a top notch chorus on board. However, simply a chorus isn't enough to redeem those guitars, too many amps have them on board nowadays, and there are many great stomp boxes available I would like to hear what the Aphex system does though. Linda Ronstadt used it on her, "Simple Dreams" album, which sounded great, at least for its time.

Myself, sight unseen, I'd go for the Epiphone.

The "T Bucket" has a decent reputation, but it is a small body and would be a bit bass light. A friend of mine had one of those Hummingbirds decades ago, and she kicked ass with it
Last edited by Captaincranky at Sep 21, 2017,
#124
Captaincranky Thanks ...I appreciate it...friend has an Epi and it is great...friend has a dean...its ok...didn't know on the t bucket...kinda my holdup.  I always liked the Epiphone anyways.  Just needed an outside opinion.  Preciate it man!
#126
I jog on a treadmill each morning, and I am listening to the radio at the same time, and sometimes, every once in a while there is music playing where I can get to match the pacing of the foot steps, with the tempo of the music, and then.. I often find that the song seem to have an uneven tempo.

Lol, forgive me for this perhaps silly question, but, I can't help but wondering, could I right about this? Thinking that some songs when performed having this uneven (bad) tempo occasionally as the song is playing, sometimes normal tempo, then it slows down a little bit, hardly noticeable, as if out of tempo compared to my regular running tempo on a treadmill. As if the artists simply seem to have an uneven tempo playing their song.
Last edited by LazyUsername at Sep 26, 2017,
#127
LazyUsernameWell, different parts of the same musical piece can certainly be at a different tempo or time signature. The terms on sheet music are traditionally written in Italian. Thus you'll sometimes see, "poco ritardando" which means "slow down a little". You'll also see, "ritardando poco a poco", which means, "slow down little by little. This is often found at he end of a piece..

Now, Jethro Tull songs were often in mixed time signatures. You might find something like, "4/4", then the next measure might be "7/4".

The same holds true for modern heavy and symphonic metal. Or in fact, all sub-genres of metal.contain this device to one extent of another.

Now, if you want true , even time signatures, and steady tempos while you're hoofin' it on the treadmill, you have to find stuff in "2/4", which is even called, "march time". Although in reality, 4/4, "cut time", and even 6/8 & 12/8 can also be made workable. Stay away from 3/4 though, that would be "waltz time".
Last edited by Captaincranky at Sep 26, 2017,
#128
I've had a little parlor size classical guitar for some time now but I've never really bothered to play it. So I was wondering what you guys think a good classical song might br to start off on. And also will ANY of the techniques I've learned playing metal apply to classical ?
#129
dametalstratguy Virtually none of the technique you've learned playing metal are appllcable to classical guitar. What I'm calling "classical guitar", involves nylon string instruments, (of an certain approximate size), played finger style only. And I realize this may seem a little sarcastic, but we both know you're not going to be at all entertaining sitting around either doing chug rhythms, or electric style single line leads

Although, I have heard a number of metal guitarists play some really beautiful music on nylon strung instruments. But, if you've never played finger style before, get ready for a rude awakening when you try to switch over from flat picking.

If you can read standard notation, one of those "1000 Popular Songs" fake books, could possibly guide you to arranging melodies into the chord structure of pop music. Classical style guitar guitar arrangements have some commonality with piano material . Granted, your right hand is playing both hands of the piano, but that's because your left hand has to constantly tune the damned thing. (Dear god, I hope that makes at least some sense to you).

You could also try working out some of Fleetwood Mac's material. Lindsey Buckingham is probably the most notorious finger style guitarist in all of rock.
Last edited by Captaincranky at Oct 2, 2017,
#130
Captaincranky Ok thanks man. I've messed around with finger-style a lot lately which is why I want to maybe learn some classical stuff. I play multiple instruments so I can read SN but I also have really crappy vision so I usually convert it to tab and memorize it. I didn't really get the part about the piano. I sort of got the right hand part but not the left hand part.

Thank you for your help 


(rip dimebag)
#131
Quote by dametalstratguy
I've had a little parlor size classical guitar for some time now but I've never really bothered to play it. So I was wondering what you guys think a good classical song might br to start off on. And also will ANY of the techniques I've learned playing metal apply to classical ?


If you're serious about learning the classical way of playing, and not just playing "classical" songs by any means necessary, then I strongly recommend that you either find a teacher and take lessons, or at least get yourself a reputable method book and work your way through the basics of the methodology, techniques, and repertoire.

That's a steeper learning curve, for sure, but it's ultimately the best way of going about it, and a good instructor will multiply your progress immensely.
My God, it's full of stars!
#132
Dreadnought OK I'll talk to my grandfather about it. He has played classical for quite awhile and will probably be willing to help me out. I have a lot of theory and method books lying around the house and I'm sure one of them focuses on classical style. When I was just starting on guitar I thought anyone who played a standard acoustic was weird but now here I am trying to learn classical. I guess I just needed some motivation to try something new. Anyways thanks for the help and of course stay metal dudes


(rip dimebag)
#133
Hello buddies,

I would like to attach an audio file and ask  if you know the musical  composition 's name. 
Please tell me can do it or I have to upload it using youtube?
Thanks in advance
Frank 
Last edited by fbfortune at Oct 7, 2017,
#136
Hello buddies,

Here is the link of the musical fragment. Please click to listen and if any one knows, please tell me its name. Thanks in advance:

https://clyp.it/g4yealyq

Best regards,
Frank  
Last edited by fbfortune at Oct 7, 2017,
#139
Quote by dametalstratguy
Just a quick question about capos:

Will a capo like this:


work on a nylon strung guitar?
In all honesty, those things are the biggest, most inconvenient pieces of crap, to ever clutter up a music store display case

This is what you really want, you just don't know it yet:

http://www.musiciansfriend.com/accessories/daddario-planet-waves-ns-classical-guitar-capo/360399000000000?cntry=us&source=3WWRWXGP&gclid=EAIaIQobChMIs6OI5tTv1gIVzAOGCh198wDWEAQYAyABEgIMwfD_BwE&kwid=productads-adid^221957295803-device^c-plaid^323968368423-sku^360399000000000@ADL4MF-adType^PLA
#140
Captaincranky Well I'm trying to find a capo that will work well on both my nylon and my electric. The nylon is not a classical and I believe it does not have a flat neck. I'm also trying to keep a REALLY REALLY tight budget because there a lot of more important things I need to spend my money on for my recording project that I need the capo for.
#141
dametalstratguy Do what you must. But, the same NS capos are available with curved jaws. All will capo a 12 string well up the neck. The standard string width of a 12 strings is 1 7/8"

If you "classical" does have a radiused fret board, then is it possible it is what people are calling "a crossover nylon". It would help to know the brand.

A decent capo is a long term investment. Barring theft or loss, a good one can last several years.
#142
Quote by dametalstratguy
Captaincranky Well I'm trying to find a capo that will work well on both my nylon and my electric. The nylon is not a classical and I believe it does not have a flat neck. I'm also trying to keep a REALLY REALLY tight  budget because there a lot of more important things I need to spend my money on for my recording project that I need the capo for.

If your nylon string guitar has a radiused fretboard a normal acoustic guitar capo should work OK (but most hybrid nylon string guitars have wider fretboards than steel string acoustics so you need to be careful that the capo bar is long enough).

 A reasonably good capo that is designed for universal use is the TGI Universal C9. One edge of the capo is flat and the other is curved so they work on all guitars. The ratchet strap is also adjustable so it will fit all necks.

See here: https://www.alangregory.co.uk/music/TGI_C9_Universal_Guitar_Capo.html

I always keep one in my guitar case for emergency use by musicians at folk clubs  
Last edited by Garthman at Oct 18, 2017,
#143
Garthman Our "caller" is from West Palm Beach Florida. I've never seen that particular capo stateside. I'll qualify that by saying, I never actually looked for one either.

FWIW,, the Planet Waves "NS" style capos should be available on both sides of the pond.

The standard NS model will capo my 12 strings up to the 9th fret. Those are 17/8" nut width. I really appreciate thew vernier screw adjustment, especially for my purposes. The octave strings on the 12 still buzz long after the prime strings have sufficient tension to quiet them.

I don't think all crossover guitars have full width classical necks on them, but this is where a model number and or a ruler could shed quite a bit more light on the issue.
#145
Quote by Tony Done
Captaincranky

The Cordoba "Fusion" is 1 7/8".

Yeah. Most of them are around that width.
#146
I'm new to playing guitar. Can someone tell me how to play this? Like do i need to pick the snares at the same time? Why are the 4s bigger than the other numbers and stuff like that.
#147
I'm new to playing guitar. Can someone tell me how to play this? Like do i need to pick the snares at the same time? Why are the 4s bigger than the other numbers and stuff like that. 
Last edited by klm.251023 at Oct 30, 2017,
#150
Dreadnought Hey I put on some elixir custom light 11/52s and restrung the low E string, and began to play a few notes real quick, and I noticed no matter what I did, i couldnt make any noise come from the 1st fret but buzzing and the sound of the second fret, which makes no sense to me because I was playing the first fret. Its also insanely hard to press down on the first fret but the rest of the notes are fine and play normal. This was my first time restringing by myself and it looked exactly as it should so Im super lost.
#151
IWantToDie The cause of difficulty pressing down strings at the 1st fret is the strings are too high, and the string to nut clearance has to be reduced by filing the grooves deeper in the nut. The measurments are critical to thousandths of an inch, so I don't recommend the you flly into the job if you don't have any experience, and don't know what those measurements should be.

Then too, if you're simply not strong enough to press the strings firmly against the 1st fret, buzzing is bound to happen. I'm thinking it's a combination of both factors causing your problem. In other words the strings are too high, and you're not strong enough, at least as of now.

Another possibility, (but less likely), is that the 2nd fret is a bit high, and the strings are buzzing against it.

Whatever the case may be, it's time you learned the mechanics of setting up an acoustic, with measurements being of paramount importance.

So, read this: http://thbecker.net/guitar_playing/guitars_and_setup/setup_page_01.html You'll be much better prepared to diagnose and discuss your problems after you do.
#152
IWantToDie What gauge strings did you have before?

I'll second everything that Captaincranky has said, with the caveat that I think it's more likely that you have fret or neck issues as opposed to the string fitting in the groove. Since you put custom lights on, I'm assuming that you had a thicker gauge on there before, and if that were the case the custom light's should not necessitate groove work in the nut.
My God, it's full of stars!