#1
Sorry for taking your time guys,
I'm trying to form a homestudio and i want to use some rackmount units, not anything like poweramp, preamp etc but just some effects, noisegate, equalizer etc. so, i'm hoping to record my guitar my directly plugging into a audio interface. But in that case, how can i use these rackmount units?
Sorry if it's like the dumbest question on earth, but i'm really new to this kind of stuff.
thanks in advace
#2
Some recording programs have latency compensation for external effects, so in essence if you have more than two outputs on your interface you can take out pre fx feed and bring back on another input. You can use them for tonal shaping of individual instruments either on input or solo instrument or mix, bus out and record back in with effects applied.
If you have mixer you can get more creative and bus out multitrack outputs of your session and mix on the fly.
#3
Most DAW software has excellent native EQ, compression, noise gate, reverb, and delay plugins available that are a lot cleaner and more versatile than outboard effects. I would try those first. If you really want to use a favorite outboard effect I usually use a small mixer and run through them B4 the interface input. This way all your analog signal gets processed B4 the AD converter for best results.
"Your sound is in your hands as much as anything. It's the way you pick, and the way you hold the guitar, more than it is the amp or the guitar you use." -- Stevie Ray Vaughan

"Anybody can play. The note is only 20 percent. The attitude of the motherfucker who plays it is 80 percent." -- Miles Davis

Guthrie on tone: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zmohdG9lLqY
#4
Thank you guys so much. Excuse me but, if i can directly connect rack units to my interface, what is the purpose of a mixer?
#5
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mixing_console

and more seriously - if you wand all your effects to be permanently connected to the AI and not to get lost in the wiring the mixer is a good idea.

But like Cajun Daddy said it's much easier to work with onboard effects of your DAW and what's more important you always record an un-effected signal so you can change the effect later on in the mixing process if you have a new idea, for example you do not like the chorus or delay anymore in that best take you laid down
Last edited by Dominant7 at Jan 21, 2017,
#6
Quote by Cajundaddy
Most DAW software has excellent native EQ, compression, noise gate, reverb, and delay plugins available that are a lot cleaner and more versatile than outboard effects. I would try those first.


This. 100x this. Your rackmount guitar gear is great for live stuff, but for studio... they are usually of substandard quality to even most built-in plugins these days.

Quote by Cajundaddy
If you really want to use a favorite outboard effect I usually use a small mixer and run through them B4 the interface input. This way all your analog signal gets processed B4 the AD converter for best results.


I'm not sure what point there would be in putting a mixer between the guitar and the first input of your FX chain would be. However, yes, you could put that FX processor first, before your interface, and record the wet signal. The disadvantage there is that you can't change it later.

An alternative would be to Record your guitar the way you like it - minus the FX - to your software. Then, run a line out from your interface to the line in on the FX rack, do your processing, and record it back via a line out from the FX rack back into your interface. The advantage here is that you can sit there and monkey with FX as much as you like until it is perfect before you commit to recording it. And if you decide later it is still not right, you can hook it up again and just run it through the fX again and not have to re-record it. The only caution with that, though, is that this does take some time to process, so your guitar part might be 20ms out or whatever. Solution: click and drag the part backwards in time so it matches up perfectly with the originally recorded guitar part without the FX.

CT
Could I get some more talent in the monitors, please?

I know it sounds crazy, but try to learn to inhale your voice. www.thebelcantotechnique.com

Chris is the king of relating music things to other objects in real life.
#7
Quote by boranathema
Thank you guys so much. Excuse me but, if i can directly connect rack units to my interface, what is the purpose of a mixer?


A mixer gives you two options that may or may not be useful to you. The first is to normalize your gain through sometimes-finicky outboard effects to preserve the highest S/N ratio. The other is to allow you to run a live dry signal to one channel and a wet effects signal to another channel pre-interface with zero latency or other A/D/A artifacts. This way you can always mix your wet effects channel later in post within the DAW in perfect sequence. There are other ways to accomplish these things but sometimes an analog mixer is the simplest tool.
"Your sound is in your hands as much as anything. It's the way you pick, and the way you hold the guitar, more than it is the amp or the guitar you use." -- Stevie Ray Vaughan

"Anybody can play. The note is only 20 percent. The attitude of the motherfucker who plays it is 80 percent." -- Miles Davis

Guthrie on tone: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zmohdG9lLqY