#1
I have been trying to figure out a way to quickly go from standard tuning to half step down.

It got me thinking...couldn't I put something in the cavity to simulate depressing the term bar down 1/2 step?

I use dive only.

So add black to drop 1/2 step...remove block to return to standard.

Would this work?
#2
Unfortunately, there are no guarantees that a Floyd will drop all strings exactly the same amount.
#3
I heard that evh had some sort of stepped Floyd that had some sort of locks...I can't find it again.
#4
Quote by rs_herhuth
I heard that evh had some sort of stepped Floyd that had some sort of locks...I can't find it again.


The D-Tuna changes ONE string and needs to be calibrated expressly for that string.
#5
Quote by dspellman
The D-Tuna changes ONE string and needs to be calibrated expressly for that string.


I didn't like the dtuna on my Wolfgangs. and OP, keep in mind that you can't pull up with it, as the trem is decked.
#6
Yeah I have the dtuna and tremol-no. That's what gave me the idea is locking the teen for dive only...it restricts the trem to return to the standard tuning. If could move that forward it would lower the tuning no?
#7
Quote by rs_herhuth
Yeah I have the dtuna and tremol-no. That's what gave me the idea is locking the teen for dive only...it restricts the trem to return to the standard tuning. If could move that forward it would lower the tuning no?


Once again, there's no guarantee that all the strings will lower the same amount. In fact, when I tried this on my Floyds, none of them dropped a half step equally (in tune). I use a Variax, which will easily do alternate tunings with a Floyd (though the only guitar they sell that has a Floyd is the JTV-89F). String tension never changes. You could also use one of the drop tuning pedals, which track the existing tuning and drop it in half-step increments. You could also attempt this with one of the motorized tuners, like the Tronical, but you'd be limited to a very short range of drop before the whole thing got so floppy it was unusuable (these things change the string tension).
#8
Yeah I just tried it to...not to mention the intonation kind of goes whack too. I can't believe no one has figured out a way to do this yet.
#9
Quote by rs_herhuth
Yeah I just tried it to...not to mention the intonation kind of goes whack too. I can't believe no one has figured out a way to do this yet.


It's really not that surprising that nobody has figured out how to do it. It's physically impossible. That's why most people don't use their Floyd guitars for multiple tunings, and have more than one guitar.
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#10
Quote by rs_herhuth
Yeah I just tried it to...not to mention the intonation kind of goes whack too. I can't believe no one has figured out a way to do this yet.


I have the answer. buy another guitar
#11
Quote by trashedlostfdup
I have the answer. buy another guitar



I second the motion. The Variax seems pretty cool, but if you don't want to spend $500-600 for a used one, finding an extra axe for another tuning should be pretty easy. I mean, a Squier Bullet runs around $60-70 used.
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#12
It seems to me that, if it is only used for dive bombing, then SIX of the EVH drop tuners would work...

...however, they would be more than you might get a 2nd guitar for!

Incidentally, I've built a guitar and it had a cheap Chinese "Licensed" Floyd; the trem arm fitting was rubbish, so I replaced it with a Schaller one (actually, the seller refunded me my £11 when I contacted them, so it just cost me £9 for the Schaller arm!). I'm not sure if it's up to the rigours of the road, but it might be good for a one-off song.
#13
Quote by rs_herhuth
Yeah I just tried it to...not to mention the intonation kind of goes whack too. I can't believe no one has figured out a way to do this yet.


Actually Steinberger figured it out 30 years ago

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/TransTrem

Actually called Mark!

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#14
Quote by steven seagull
Actually Steinberger figured it out 30 years ago

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/TransTrem



Forgot about them. I did try one however, and it worked pretty much as advertised. What I didn't like was the fact that the string tension changed each time (as did bending, etc.) -- and it was fairly limited. That may be part of the reason that it was never wildly successful. In addition (as I recall) it required double ball end calibrated strings, which weren't cheap and weren't easy to find. I think the newest version (probably eight or nine years old now) eliminated the need for double-ball end strings and changed a few other things. Alan Holdsworth had one on one of his headless guitars for a long time.
#15
Okay I locked the tremol-no loosened the nut tuned down 1/2 step locked the nut loosened the tremol-no fine tuned it a worked like magic. No spring adjustment necessary. Now for standard tuning I capo the first fret.

And I do have 3 other guitars but they don't scream like my evh.
#16
Quote by trashedlostfdup
I have the answer. buy another guitar


That's what I did. There's just no easy way to change tunings with a floating FR.
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#17
Quote by rs_herhuth
Now for standard tuning I capo the first fret.


Seriously. You used a capo.
#18
Quote by DarthV
That's what I did. There's just no easy way to change tunings with a floating FR.


Other than a pedal or a Variax.