#1
Is it just me or its 2x harder when you descend to a scale? It's much more easier if I do it ascending...
#3
Yeah but I always sorta blamed it on me not knowing the scale enough.
It's sorta hard to conceptualize but I like to practice my scales in a linear way- meaning that I want to start from point A and end with point B.
So after I finish with getting to point B(the end of the scale), i'm usually like, "hell yeah" and I forget everything.
It's hard to walk backwards lol
"ba doo doo ba doo doo ba doo daa"
- earth,wind, and fire
#4
For most people a certain direction works better than the other. As you get faster your preferred direction might also change. :-) In the end you have to practice both directions independently, just like you practiced two different exercises...
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The Smarter Way to Practice Guitar
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#6
vayne92 don't be a jackass

eajuncloud1, it can be, really whatever you've practiced most and best is what you're going to find easiest. That's always going to be true, over the years I've played for I've found all sorts of things easy, which have become more difficult again later as I got bored of them or whatever. If you really want to be able to do something then practice it well, and practice it a lot. It'll become easy in time.
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#7
Hey Tony Done, the physiological reason resides in the brain and is called muscle memory. Muscle memory is memory for muscles, rather than memory in muscles. Repetition creates new neural pathways in the brain, which literally becomes hardwired to perform the practiced activity. The brain no longer has to work hard to make it happen, so the activity feels easy to you. You just do it automatically, without having to think about it.

By the way, some researchers believe it takes between 1.000 and 30.000 repetitions of an activity for it to become second nature to you. :-)
Fretello - Amplify your Skills
The Smarter Way to Practice Guitar
www.fretello.com
#9
Tony Done
you're definitely right

imo I think it's really based on the person. Of course muscle memory has a lot to do with it but I don't believe that it's a concrete concept in which you do 1,000-30,000 repetitions and instantaneously it's 2nd nature. There are so many extraneous variables that make it so difficult to actually answer this question to a full truth.
"ba doo doo ba doo doo ba doo daa"
- earth,wind, and fire