#1
for example on a sheet music there is a high F i can play it by plucking the first fret on the high E or the sixth fret on the B string, how do i know which one of those two i pluck?
#2
It doesn't really matter. They are the same note and will sound the same (well, technically playing the same note on a different string sounds slightly different, but it's such a small difference that nobody will notice it, unless we are talking about notes on open strings). Which position you should choose depends on what comes before and after that note. It's all about what is the most convenient way of playing it.
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#3
If you are reading from a sheet, you will have to play that pitch note, and ok for this you can have some options as you say. In this cases you will have to see where is more conformable to you, and from where you come playing and where you are going.

Some more specific sheets (specially those for practice) says in which box of the fretboard you'll have to play.

Cheers,
#4
Whichever works for what you're playing. The primary considerations are technique - is that note reachable from the other notes in the melody?; and timbre - does the note's tone fit with the rest of melody?
#5
Quote by dieteroni
for example on a sheet music there is a high F i can play it by plucking the first fret on the high E or the sixth fret on the B string,
Not to mention 10th fret G string, 15th fret D string, and 20th fret A string.
Quote by dieteroni
how do i know which one of those FIVE i pluck?
As mentioned, it depends on (a) what other notes you need to play (where does the whole phrase sit most easily under the fingers?), and (b) where it sounds best.
#6
Sometimes you got to trust your gut as much as your ear. There's only one rule in music, "If it sounds right/good, it is good." It's okay to play the melody on bass or play the written bassline. For lead, play what sounds right to you.
"I don't know what you're trying to suggest. There's no shame in taking what you need to hold your position!"

Super Buu (DBZ) on assimilation (it could also apply to blues guitar and guitar soloing in general).
#8
That's one advantage (accurate) guitar tablature has over sheet music, you'll always know which fret and string you're supposed to play for every note.
#9
Quote by NSpen1
That's one advantage (accurate) guitar tablature has over sheet music, you'll always know which fret and string you're supposed to play for every note.


The advantage to working out positions from the staff is that it forces you to deal with the music on a technical level. Simply being told doesn't help you nearly as much in developing a natural sense of positioning. It's a pretty essential point of technique for anyone trying to move beyond intermediate skill.

How you approach positioning in classical guitar vs other styles is a major distinction, but if you're reading something like a jazz chart, you really need to have a good sense of where to play each phrase so you don't end up in awkward place. It's a skill in itself, and it ties into fundamental aspects of your playing, such as phrasing, dynamics, and overall tone.
#10
cdgraves
Fair point but I think you also learn a feel for the 'correct' positioning just from playing a lot of music, and a tab which is correct in that regard will help you to see where people typically play certain types of things. Like you'll learn that a lot of rock/blues playing is in the typical pentatonic box positions - conversely I have seen tabs on here which have some strange positioning, when it seems obvious that they should be in those box positions!
To be honest I would expect someone to have developed "a natural sense of positioning" by the time or before they had reached an intermediate skill level.
#11
Sometimes the question is not being a blind follower of tab, regardless of correctness claims. Tab can definitely be used instructively. However, it comes down to sound: not what the editor wants the player to play, but what the player wants the audience to hear as a result of aspects like finger positions and dexterity at the time of performance.

Sound and finger position are related concepts, and a good player will adapt their playing to the desired sound effect and not be constrained by a tab prescription of finger position correctness.
#12
NeoMvsEu
Sure, I just wanted to put the case for tab, i.e. it has its value, it's not just a case of "sheet music good; tab bad".
And the editor versus player thing you mention is exactly what I meant with "(accurate) guitar tablature", a really good, accurate tab should show the exact position the guitar player played it in as far as is possible.
#13
NSpen1

I think there is a large mindset gap between classical and popular playing, especially when it comes to covers. I'm not always looking to play things exactly the way composers wrote them; there is a signature "me" sound when I'm playing (at least on piano). There are definitely easier ways to play any line; however, it is ultimately up to the player to decide how they will ultimately play, not a tab prescription. This is not to say that there are no rules; it is just that there are many routes to the general destination of playing a song, and one tab imposes just one route instead of justified exploration.

Copying what the artist is doing articulation for articulation may have its uses; however, the player might want to create a different aural effect than the original, and with just the notes to play from (regardless of position), that is much easier to achieve. This is part of the reason why many classical pieces have largely different interpretations despite the same notes being written on the page.

My point: it is the sound that matters over the exact position of playing, and it doesn't matter what the original player played as long as you can justify any changes with your own playing

(I suppose that this is a counterpoint to MaggaraMarine, in that the sound matters a lot more, particularly in classical circles)
#14
NeoMvsEu
ok, I misunderstood you, you were meaning any player interpreting a piece as opposed to what the original player was playing, which is what I was thinking of.
I mean if I'm tabbing something then I try to get it as close to how it was originally played as possible. It depends what you want to achieve of course, whether you want to learn a song 'faithfully' or whether you want to put your own interpretation on it. Though probably if you are making your own interpretation you're going to be changing much more than just the position of the notes, if all you change is the position then it's not going to sound wildly different.
(Also not so sure that popular playing has less variation in interpretation when it comes to covers! assuming I didn't misunderstand your point again)
#15
Quote by NSpen1
cdgraves
To be honest I would expect someone to have developed "a natural sense of positioning" by the time or before they had reached an intermediate skill level.


For a lot of music, yes, especially music where the melodies are often created by noodling in a "box" scale pattern. In many cases, if you hear a bunch of hammer/pull on certain notes, there's only one position that actually makes sense for it, and that's because most rock was made by and for guitarists. But pick up a jazz chart and you'll find that everything knew about position-based patterns goes out the window. It's a very different challenge when you actually have a lot of options within a single phrase, and you really have to go through and see which positions accommodate the many various considerations.

And where position really matters is in improvisation. That's when you have to actively make decisions about timbre and phrasing and technique, and you have to develop that sixth sense of where your notes are even if you're changing positions every other beat. Stuff like 4 note per string scales and 2 nps arpeggios are great for working up that skill.