Page 1 of 2
#1
Hi, I'm a beginner and my guitar (Epiphone dr-100 sunburst) doesn't sound as bright as before, so I want to know which strings I should buy. Thanks for reading and helping.
#2
SIMGH:

Lots of different string lovers around here. I prefer Elixirs....they last a long, long time. I've had the Elixirs on my guitar for 15 months so far, and I don't know if they were new when I got it (probably not...was a display model). With the brightness gone, my Cargo sounds a lot like a Martin.

My instructor prefers el cheapo D'addario Bronze wounds (I think it was) which run about $5.99. They sound great, but don't last long (no protective coating).
#4
Quote by Tony Done
String choice is a personal thing. I use John Pearse phosphor bronze, and I think that you would want them in light (12-53) gauge.


OP, please ignore Tony Done. He's a savage from the under Hemisphere. Their strings are cobbled together from Dingo gut and yarn.
#5
TobusRex
(sniff) I suppose you would recommend Elixirs or something equally limp-wristed in 10-46.

I had to buy D'Addario a couple of days a ago. The coloured string balls look garish to me, though I have to admit that the packaging is better than JP.
Last edited by Tony Done at Jan 26, 2017,
#6
Quote by SIMGH
Hi, I'm a beginner and my guitar (Epiphone dr-100 sunburst) doesn't sound as bright as before, so I want to know which strings I should buy. Thanks for reading and helping.
That's an inherent issue with all laminate guitars. New string add the "chime" people expect, but once the strings break in, this type of guitar loses quite a bit of resonance.

To forestall that, you'd make the best of the situation by using some type of coated string.

"Phosphor bronze", are "warm sounding", are are often used to tame overly bright guitars. Granted "overly bright", is quite subjective. I have a laminate Ibanez which suffers from just what you're describing. My "solution", is to use a "brass alloy", packaged as "80/20" (it's actually "bell bronze".).

So, I suggest trying an 80/20 brass coated string, Either EXP-11 (D.Addario), or the comparable Elixir brand 80/20.

Either one of those strings will outlast whatever the Epiphone shipped with. I think the Elixirs would last somewhat longer, but they're a couple dollars more a pack. Elixir uses a jacket type coating, while the D'Addario's are "treated" (?).

80/20 strings are strident and lack bass new. There is at least a chance you might like the guitar better AFTER they break in, but not before.

Here's the Elixirs: http://www.musiciansfriend.com/accessories/elixir-80-20-bronze-acoustic-guitar-strings-with-nanoweb-coating-light-.012-.053

D'Addario: http://www.musiciansfriend.com/accessories/daddario-exp11-coated-80-20-bronze-light-acoustic-guitar-strings
Last edited by Captaincranky at Jan 26, 2017,
#7
I agree with CC's dscussion of 80/20 bronze, but I wonder about longevity. They used to have a reputation for being short lived, but maybe coating them has changed that.

I forgot to mention that I have recently tried Ernie Ball Aluminium Bronze. They are bright and aggressive, and supposedly long lasting. They would be worth a try.
#8
Quote by Tony Done
I agree with CC's dscussion of 80/20 bronze, but I wonder about longevity. They used to have a reputation for being short lived, but maybe coating them has changed that.
Well, they stay brighter than PB until their demise. I've sort of gravitated toward 80/20's. Perhaps one might say PB is dull a whole lot longer. I've gravitated toward 80/20 on 6 strings. 12 Strings have plenty of bright, and would be unnecessarily strident with brass. In fact, Taylor ships the 150e with PB Elixirs, which may be a change away from brass after the first batch(es?) were delivered.


A couple of things favor brass, even when tonal quality is completely ignored. They're easier on frets! (Bell bronze is much softer than PB), and, they're easier to fret. 80/20 alloy actually is easier to bend than PB, and what are we doing when we try to push a string down, if not "bending it"?

There is a negligible difference in tension, lower in brass by at most 5 lbs., gauges being equal. I don't think the slight drop in tension is responsible for the fretting and bending difference, I believe it is material based.
Quote by Tony Done
I forgot to mention that I have recently tried Ernie Ball Aluminum Bronze. They are bright and aggressive, and supposedly long lasting. They would be worth a try.
A nickel alloy "Monel", has also been resurrected. It's allegedly from , "the early days". Reviews all all over the map on its tonal quality, so "caveat emptor" on those.

I think the guy in whose name the strings are branded says, "the magic is back", but then he would...
#9
Captaincranky

Having used electric strings on acoustics, I've got absolutely no enthusiasm for Monels. The aluminium Bronze are good stuff though if you want bright.

All this stuff is interactive, I like phos bronze, so I tend to end up with guitars on which they work well.
#10
Quote by SIMGH
Hi, I'm a beginner and my guitar (Epiphone dr-100 sunburst) doesn't sound as bright as before, so I want to know which strings I should buy. Thanks for reading and helping.


The "bright" tone of new strings doesn't last very long. I change strings on my main acoustics about every 3 weeks.

Which strings you use is entirely up to you. I would recommend that you try different strings to find ones you like.

FWIW I use cheep and cheerful (but actually very good quality) 80/20s.
#11
I'm sure every guitarist is going to have their own personal preference for strings and I think it does tend to be fairly subjective in terms of what is bright sounding to a person. You may have to try a few different brands and see how they sound.

I've been using D'addario on electric for many years, because they work well for me. I did once try Ernie Ball, but not a great experience for me.
Last edited by V3n0m777 at Jan 27, 2017,
#12
Quote by V3n0m777
I'm sure every guitarist is going to have their own personal preference for strings and I think it does tend to be fairly subjective in terms of what is bright sounding to a person. ..[ ]...
While subjectivity is always an issue between players, 80/20 brass will always be brighter than phosphor bronze, both across the same brand, and comparing the two different alloys between different brands. The tonal difference comparing D'Addario to Ernie Ball of the same alloy will be less, while comparing the tonal difference of the different alloys of the same brand, will be greater.

I hope that's clear, it's late.
Last edited by Captaincranky at Jan 27, 2017,
#13
Strings are an interesting topic. I remember asking in this forum awhile back about how long strings could last and some guys were saying they'd had strings on their instrument for well over a year, and they still sounded okay.

If I wasn't so lazy I'd swap the strings out on mine, but they really do sound okay. I wonder if my strings are lasting so well because the guitar rarely needs tuned? I play anywhere from 30 minutes to a couple hours a day, generally. Oh, plus I never use picks (unless I break a nail), that must help as well.
#15
I've left my spruce/maple jumbo 12 string with the same strings for years before. They were pretty grungy by that point, but still sounded good, but I did finally change them. Generally do 6-12 months with Elixir Nanoweb on my 6 strings.
#17
Quote by FrogstarWorldA
I've left my spruce/maple jumbo 12 string with the same strings for years before. They were pretty grungy by that point, but still sounded good, but I did finally change them....[ ]...
Well that's the trick with 12 strings, they're so naturally chimey, you almost never have to change the strings. I only change strings on my twelves when the frets go through the windings of the G-3 prime. In fact, 12 strings sound better with dead strings (IMHO, of course). The Epi DR-100, which is the subject of this thread, is likely a far different animal.
Last edited by Captaincranky at Jan 27, 2017,
#18
Quote by Tony Done


I think that old string are more obvious on some guitars than others. A lot of Martins I've tried sound like the strings are old to me even when they are fairly new. I hear it first in the 6th string sounding dull.
My first experience with Martin was about 1970. I played an electric at the time. There were nothing but standard strings around then. You can't imagine how unimpressed I was was with that nasty dull ass dreadnought.

Later that same "era", I bought a hunnerd dollar "Crown" dread. I dunno if it was solid or laminate. Anyway, it sounded great with its brand new strings. So, I did what any red blooded hippy would have done, swallowed a fistful of bennies, played it for about 2 hours until the strings went dead, and sold it 3 weeks later 'cause I needed the money...
Last edited by Captaincranky at Jan 27, 2017,
#19
Captaincranky

"Imagine"? Yes I can. I played Japanese cheapos for about 13 tears before I bought a "name" guitar - a Maton FG-100 - not long after I emigrated to Oz. I've played a few Martin's I thought were very good - 000-18s, D-18s, and D-28s - but the majority have left me unimpressed. I haven't bothered trying one in years.
#21
fahmisaif13061

i love the coated strings theyare using nowadays, i'm using elixirs coated and they last so long!
And also it's so much less painful to slide up and down the fretboard.
"ba doo doo ba doo doo ba doo daa"
- earth,wind, and fire
#22
So many choices out there. Of course, as has been said before. Try a few different ones and work out what you prefer.

For me, I have a bunch of guitars including a couple of Martins, a Cole Clark, a Maton and a Gibson. I used to try and match the sound I wanted from the particular guitar with the strings. Heavier strings for the dreads etc. I used to spend time thinking about coatings too. These days I just get buy a three pack of Elixr 12s - Poly coated and that's that!! Just seem to sound great and last!
#23
D'Addario EJ16-3D Phosphor Bronze Acoustic Guitar Strings. I been using them for a year. You can get a three pack for 12.99 on amazon.I changed them about every 2-4 months depending on guitar I have them on. I would say light gauge if you are a new player.D'addarios also have coated with ones as well but one pack run about 13 dollars on those. I am going try those next to see if they are about the same. One guy at work though swears by those Martin Bluegrass ones.
"Music became a healer for me. And I learned to listen with all my being. I found that it could wipe away all the emotions of fear and confusion relating to my family." Eric Clapton
#24
martin phosphor bronze extra lights(10-47) for me.
best sounding string for my taylor oddly enough.
VHT Special 6 ultra
TC HOF Reverb
Line 6 DL4
EHX OD Glove
Fender standard Tele
Ibanez Rga121
Taylor GA 214E
#25
Quote by the_white_bunny
martin phosphor bronze extra lights(10-47) for me.
best sounding string for my taylor oddly enough.


Well "oddly enough" perhaps - especially when you see all the comments about how you need to use 12's minimum to get a reasonably sound (which is nonsense if applied universally) - but I've found the same. I use 10's (but 80/20) on my Crafter dreadnought which is as close to a Taylor as it's possible to get - but lots and lots cheaper
#27
"Music became a healer for me. And I learned to listen with all my being. I found that it could wipe away all the emotions of fear and confusion relating to my family." Eric Clapton
#28
Quote by Blackwaterson89


Yeah. I posted that vid in the "Making an acoustic play like an electric" thread a week or so ago. Not a lot of difference, is there?
#29
Quote by Tony Done
Garthman

Hmm. There's a reason why most US-style steel strings come equipped with 12s or even 13s. There are exceptions, in terms of both sound and what players like, eg Bert Jansch, but IMO they are exceptions rather than the rule.


The reason most guitars come fitted with 12s (or "lights") is that they are the average gauge between extra lights and heavies.Sensible players fit the gauge they prefer in terms of sound and playability.
#30
Garthman

I see it more as a compromise between what feels acceptable (lights) and what sounds good (mediums) to the potential buyer.

I mentioned recently somewhere that when I try big guitars in shops they often sound "stringy" or "bouncy" (like a rubber band) to me, because the strings are too light, but also because I don't like the Elixirs that are often fitted.
#31
Quote by Garthman
Yeah. I posted that vid in the "Making an acoustic play like an electric" thread a week or so ago. Not a lot of difference, is there?

We have different ears my friend. Mediums are darker.
"Music became a healer for me. And I learned to listen with all my being. I found that it could wipe away all the emotions of fear and confusion relating to my family." Eric Clapton
#32
Quote by Blackwaterson89
We have different ears my friend. Mediums are darker.


Darker, eh?
#33
Yes, more bass and less bright. They sound dull to me as they start to die and lose volume as they die as well.
"Music became a healer for me. And I learned to listen with all my being. I found that it could wipe away all the emotions of fear and confusion relating to my family." Eric Clapton
#34
I like nearly every Martin I've played. They are quite well behaved instruments. A bit overpriced, maybe.

Except for the Lil Martin. It's way overpriced for what you get. Martin slaps a red "X" on it and have no shame in asking $500 or more. LOL!! They are trying to become Gibson 2.0
#35
Re Martins. I have had four, and the only one I really liked for tone was made in 1925. Unfortunately it didn't have a truss rod, and I couldn't get on with the skinny strings that were needed to insure against mechanical damage.

Just a quick follow-up on string gauges. Yesterday I replaced the 13-56 on my reso with 14-58*. I have it tuned to open D, and that change in gauge is equivalent to tuning up about half a step. It made a world of difference to both the feel and the tone - less rubbery, more piano-like.

* The low six from an 11-58 7-string EB Cobalt set.
Last edited by Tony Done at Jan 29, 2017,
#36
Decades ago I bought a set of Adamas Phosphor Bronze strings purely on a whim. I instantly liked them and so just kept buying them. I must be weird though because they actually got a little hard to find in stores. Fortunately, all it takes now is the click of a mouse,
#38
Quote by Tony Done
....[ ].....Just a quick follow-up on string gauges. Yesterday I replaced the 13-56 on my reso with 14-58*. I have it tuned to open D, and that change in gauge is equivalent to tuning up about half a step. It made a world of difference to both the feel and the tone - less rubbery, more piano-like.
I shudder to think, but am wildly curious to find out, what in god's name will happen, if you start recommending that gauge set to D-d tuning noobs.

Quote by Tony Done
* The low six from an 11-58 7-string EB Cobalt set.
Don't D'Addario "Acoustic heavies" , already contain an .058 E-6? (Those aren't available in Oz maybe)?
Last edited by Captaincranky at Feb 1, 2017,
#39
Captaincranky

If you like 13-56 in E standard, 14-58 would have a similar feel and tension (a little less) in D standard. I wouldn't say "You gotta use 14-58 in D standard", but it might suit me, depending on the guitar. The difference between the two in open D on this particular reso (a National Estralita) is quite striking. OTOH, my Bourgeois was designed for dropped tunings, and sounds plenty good enough with 13-56 in D standard. - It is a big slope D, but it has one tone bar less than a Martin or Gibson, so I wouldn't push my luck with high string tension on it. I've had it for about 15 years, tuned in open D with 13-56, and the action hasn't moved at all.

I could likely get those D'Adds, but it has a magnetic pickup designed for electric strings, and I can get EB 7-string sets locally.
#40
Tony Done

I changed the wording of my previous post from "when" to "if" to align it with your reply.

Still, I plan on enjoying the show, no personal affront intended
Page 1 of 2