#1
This may sound like a dumb question but Is there any rule to follow about how low a saddle (acoustic) can be or should be apart from fret buzz etc. I think I can shave a good few thou more off but the saddle will drop really low in the bridge.
When the blue light flashes I am kidding.
#2
At a certain point the high strings will start walking across the saddle from insufficient tension. The "break angle" becomes too shallow. Tony Done insists you can saw steeper angles into the bridge from the saddle to the pin holes, which should help.

However once the saddle nears flush with the bridge, the low strings will buzz against the bridge itself.

At some point of lowering the saddle, you will have to come to grips with the fact the neck angle has rotated to far upward. announcing it's time for a reset.
Last edited by Captaincranky at Jan 28, 2017,
#3
Quote by Captaincranky
At a certain point the high strings will start walking across the saddle from insufficient tension. The "break angle" becomes too shallow. Tony Done insists you can saw steeper angles into the bridge from the saddle to the pin holes, which should help.

However once the saddle nears flush with the bridge, the low strings will buzz against the bridge itself.

At some point of lowering the saddle, you will have to come to grips with the fact the neck angle has rotated to far upward. announcing it's time for a reset.


I have read that filing a small slot in the saddle is frowned on as a means of lowering the string. Would it deal with the strings walking across the saddle?
When the blue light flashes I am kidding.
#4
helijohn

One fix is to cut a ramp between the pin hole and saddle so that the break angle of the string over the saddle is increased. You can see them in this pic, most obviously on the 1st and 2nd strings:



However, assuming that the neck relief is good, if there in very little saddle left and the action is still too high, it means that the neck angle is too low.
#5
Quote by Tony Done
helijohn

One fix is to cut a ramp between the pin hole and saddle so that the break angle of the string over the saddle is increased. You can see them in this pic, most obviously on the 1st and 2nd strings:



However, assuming that the neck relief is good, if there in very little saddle left and the action is still too high, it means that the neck angle is too low.


Yes I see the slots. It might be the angle of the pic but that saddle looks really low especially at the 1st and 2nd.

I am happy that the top strings are adequate - just 3 or 4 to 6th could be lowered.

How do you cut the ramp slots?
When the blue light flashes I am kidding.
Last edited by helijohn at Jan 28, 2017,
#6
The saddle isn't as low as it looks there, it is over 1 mm. That brass pin is the attachment for a flying brace, like a JLD Bridge Doctor, which will hopefully stop the top from bulging any further.

I used a fine burr in a Dremel. I suitable needle file might work, and I think that Stewmac sell a special little saw for the job.
#7
Quote by Tony Done
The saddle isn't as low as it looks there, it is over 1 mm. That brass pin is the attachment for a flying brace, like a JLD Bridge Doctor, which will hopefully stop the top from bulging any further.

I used a fine burr in a Dremel. I suitable needle file might work, and I think that Stewmac sell a special little saw for the job.


I am using my Dremel all of the time these days. How low would the saddle be - height off bridge - to warrant doing this?

I might use my nut files rather than Dremel as the Dremel can be rather fast.
When the blue light flashes I am kidding.
Last edited by helijohn at Jan 28, 2017,
#8
It depends on the distance between the saddle and the pin hole, as in my pic. The slots are longer and deeper on the treble side, because the pin holes are further from the saddle. The objective is to get a few degrees string break angle over the saddle. Frank Ford's (frets.com) standard is that you shouldn't be able to lift the string off the saddle when the string is at full tension. I would go a bit more angle than that. Also, if you have a UST installed, it might need a fairly big break angle, and the same angle for each string, to get the downward pressure to make it work properly.
#9
Quote by Tony Done
Also, if you have a UST installed, it might need a fairly big break angle, and the same angle for each string, to get the downward pressure to make it work properly.


Oh yes there is so it's getting more complex but in fairness it is only played as acoustic.
When the blue light flashes I am kidding.