#1
Hi All

I have no idea what this technique is actually called, or how to do it (which is what I'm here for), but I've heard it a few songs recently.

Anyway, its a artificial harmonic which I know how to do. However it sounds like the guitarist hits a simple note (not harmonic-ed) and then holding that note (sustaining) it then turns into a artificial harmonic of that same note.

From what I can hear, there is no extra picking or anything going on, the simple note is sounding out and then something happens and it goes up to the high pitch artificial harmonic of that same note.

I have no idea how they do it haha.

A few examples I can think of is BLS - Angel of Mercy Solo:

Note happens at 2.43 and even after watching zakk I can't see how it happens lol (yes I know there is a bend, but it sounds like it goes to a harmonic to me)

Zakk also does it on No More Tears, but a bunch of other people do it to.

Anyway, any ideas on how to do this? It sounds awesome haha.

Cheers
Guitars:
Ashcustomworks: Phoenix RRV
ESP LTD: M200FM - With EMG 81/81
ESP LTD: M50 - With EMG HZ's
ESP LTD: EX50
Fender: Strat

Amps:
Peavey: Vypyr 60 Tube - 1x12
Marshall: AVT100 - 1x12 & 4x12
Last edited by Stildawn at Jan 31, 2017,
#2
I've posted this exact question years ago on these forums and I still don't know the answer, but that being said i do know how to do it..
I initially discovered this same thing by listening to A LOT of Synyster Gates guitar work, and he has those same new wave American metal roots that you find in other guitarists like Zakk Wylde himself, Dimebag etc.
I can't explain it, but I'm quite positive it comes from the actual pick attack and the way in which you sustain the note. It also seems to work better on frets with an actual harmonic node or whatever you call it. Basically it comes from the fingers as they say..

I'm genuinely curious as to what other people have to say about this though, because although I can do it I've never fully understood it, and from what I've gathered over the years it's definitely a lot more technical than it may seem.

Best of luck
Last edited by vayne92 at Jan 31, 2017,
#3
You know... this is really weird, I honestly can't figure out for sure how this works. I feel like it might be some combination of feedback, wah, and maybe a touch harmonic (that is a harmonic where you sound a note and then touch the harmonic node while the note is ringing), but I am pretty far from sure at this point. Interesting to note that it looks like for the most part, while this is a solo that Wylde seems to reproduce faithfully live, that exact transition to a harmonic is pretty inconsistent. Also interesting to note that even the most ardent of Zakk's youtube devotees doesn't seem to worry about it very much.

Still, this is probably going to plague me so I may have some kind of revelation later and come back!
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#4
Quote by vayne92
I've posted this exact question years ago on these forums and I still don't know the answer, but that being said i do know how to do it..
I initially discovered this same thing by listening to A LOT of Synyster Gates guitar work, and he has those same new wave American metal roots that you find in other guitarists like Zakk Wylde himself, Dimebag etc.
I can't explain it, but I'm quite positive it comes from the actual pick attack and the way in which you sustain the note. It also seems to work better on frets with an actual harmonic node or whatever you call it. Basically it comes from the fingers as they say..

I'm genuinely curious as to what other people have to say about this though, because although I can do it I've never fully understood it, and from what I've gathered over the years it's definitely a lot more technical than it may seem.

Best of luck


yeah i sometimes manage it too (i don't play that solo, i just mean in general). if you hit the vibrato just right and also get the pick attack just right, it sort of segues into a harmonic. I can kind of do it deliberately (not with 100% success though) but at the same time, like you, i'm not entirely sure what i'm doing to make it happen.
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#5
I'd agree it's a sort of half pinched harmonic, so the pick attack is likely the key there. Can't say for sure, but I think the bending probably has something to do with it. Maybe he's striking the harmonic position of the bent note?

Of course the active pickups and boosted mids help, too.
#6
^ does the node move when the string is bent? (genuine question, I'm not sure )

and yeah i sometimes wonder too if it's just like a semi-pinch, because of the pick attack... but i'm not sure if it is. it doesn't feel like i'm really pinching, just attacking the string a bit more aggressively. but maybe that would do the same thing

now i think of it i think there's a similar one in the solo to i remember you by skid row.
I'm an idiot and I accidentally clicked the "Remove all subscriptions" button. If it seems like I'm ignoring you, I'm not, I'm just no longer subscribed to the thread. If you quote me or do the @user thing at me, hopefully it'll notify me through my notifications and I'll get back to you.
Quote by K33nbl4d3
I'll have to put the Classic T models on my to-try list. Shame the finish options there are Anachronism Gold, Nuclear Waste and Aged Clown, because in principle the plaintop is right up my alley.

Quote by K33nbl4d3
Presumably because the CCF (Combined Corksniffing Forces) of MLP and Gibson forums would rise up against them, plunging the land into war.

Quote by T00DEEPBLUE
Et tu, br00tz?
#7
So no definitive technique I can watch a youtube video on haha damn.

Any one of you who know how to do it, would you be able to really spell out the steps for me? From what I'm reading, I find the pinched harmonic area (pick attack area) for the bent note to harmonic, then I hit that and bend up until it harmonics out?
Guitars:
Ashcustomworks: Phoenix RRV
ESP LTD: M200FM - With EMG 81/81
ESP LTD: M50 - With EMG HZ's
ESP LTD: EX50
Fender: Strat

Amps:
Peavey: Vypyr 60 Tube - 1x12
Marshall: AVT100 - 1x12 & 4x12
#8
I kept trying to reproduce what Zakk is doing and I can't find the solution from playing around on my guitar. I'm pretty sure that is a pinched harmonic, which has to be picked.

I am wondering if the song was played live while the band were being filmed or if he played it slightly differently from what we can see and hear.
#9
Quote by Dave_Mc
^ does the node move when the string is bent? (genuine question, I'm not sure )

and yeah i sometimes wonder too if it's just like a semi-pinch, because of the pick attack... but i'm not sure if it is. it doesn't feel like i'm really pinching, just attacking the string a bit more aggressively. but maybe that would do the same thing

now i think of it i think there's a similar one in the solo to i remember you by skid row.


Well the node is a function of the length, so it would move a tiny bit... but when I tried to recreate the effect, I couldn't really get anything. But then I'm playing through a strat, so I got no mids to squeal with.

I did remember, though, that a compressor really moves harmonics and overtones to the fore, so maybe he's just got a ton of compression on there and it brings out the overtones. In that case it wouldn't be a harmonic per se, just something that happens when you have a lot of gain and compression with the right EQ. Add the active pickups and I'd chalk this up to gear and production more than a specific technique. Maybe a bit of aggressive pinchy pick attack, which does help emphasize the the higher tones of a note.
#10
cdgraves that's kind of my thoughts on it as well, all that plus Wylde's pretty consistent use of a wah left about half way through its range would really emphasize those overtones...
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Quote by Master Foo
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#11
Interesting. I can't explain it technique-wise so I'll bring it into something that I could explain. Some guitars have certain notes that have high harmonic overtones almost instantly when picked. If I were to throw out a theory I would say he was just below that note and bent into it. Cool solo.
#12
I don't think it's what's going on here due to the speed of the transition, but you can get similar kind of things happening on sustained passages utilising amp feedback. To do this you just need to create enough volume so that your strings vibrate - gain and maybe some compression will help.

Depending on the position of the strings compared to the cab you can kind of emphasis different harmonic overtones, so experiment with moving your guitar around the room and pointing it in different directions. I've heard people like Vai, Hendrix and Santana tape markers on the stage floor prior to shows, corresponding to points where different harmonics can be found for controlling feedback.

Perhaps experimenting with different pick attacks and maybe some wah can help grant some more control and approximate something like this video
For instance, if you slightly deaden the note whilst bending [with your fretting hand, nearing like a hammer on but on the already fretted note], and are standing in a position where feedback happens easily it might aid the speed of the transition - too much deadening will be audible and the notes will sound separate and sloppy though.
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