#1
http://acousticguitar.com/martin-guitar-unveils-its-titanium-core-acoustic-guitar-strings-winter-namm-2017/
So what do guys think? I thought about gettings some but they looks like they are going run 40 bucks a pop.
"Music became a healer for me. And I learned to listen with all my being. I found that it could wipe away all the emotions of fear and confusion relating to my family." Eric Clapton
#2
Dunno, nickel wound titanium core doesn't sound like the kind of thing I would want. Electric strings with nickel windings sound dull to me on acoustics. Titanium core was tried years ago, and as far as I can tell, they didn't catch on. I won't be queuing up to try them, I've gone the other way, EB Aluminium Bronze, bright and aggressive and supposedly long-lived.
#3
Quote by Blackwaterson89
...[ ]...So what do guys think? I thought about gettings some but they looks like they are going run 40 bucks a pop.
From a trivia standpoint, the extravagant cost of machining and obtaining titanium, was a contributing factor in the retirement of the US spy plane, the SR-71. After a certain point of inflation it became scarily enough, cheaper to launch satellites.

As for using the stuff for guitar strings, I'm of the opinion the majority of the tonal character, comes from the windings, not from the core.

If you want to experiment with the sound of nickel, I'd opt for the "newly re-released", "Monel" nickel alloy, with standard cores.

I suppose a titanium core could make its own peculiar addition to the sound of an instrument string, although it might be better blended into a tow chain to pull your car out of a ditch...

(The vast difference in tone between 80/20 brass and phosphor bronze, gives a great deal of credence to my, "the tone is in the windings", theory).
Last edited by Captaincranky at Jan 31, 2017,
#4
Titanium strings would be the bomb, assuming they sound alright. After they go dead, you can use them as ligatures!
#5
Nah. I'll stay with cheap but good 80/20 with regular string changes. Works for me.