#1
So I've just bought a second hand Dean Razorback 7 255, I've wanted one for yearssssss and finally managed to get one second for a very good price, so I was more than happy to take it. Aside from needing a little love and sorting out, its a beast!

One thing however I'm a little stuck on is how to clean the Floyd rose hardware. UNFORTUNATELY I am one of those people who likes to keep their guitars looking in as good condition as possible...always! (get over it). I'll attach some photos below so y'all can see what I'm dealing with:










free image upload

So basically, rust grime and all that nasty ish...I cant stand it! Now the intonation screws and the M4 bolts which lock in the string blocks are not a problem for me to change as I've done them before on another guitar. The problem really is with fine tuners (I dont know how the f*ck to get them off, not sure they're supposed to now, so unless I can I cant replace em), and the main floyd bridge piece itself.

Would it be wise to take the entire thing out and use something like barkeepers friend or WD40 and let it soak in em, or use a toothbrush to clean up/get ride of all the rust/discolouration/grime etc, or at least get me close? Someone mentioned steel wool on a Dremel? Unsure of this though...

If these ideas are a straight up NO, can anyone recommend me anything else I can do/use? If its a product, its availability in the UK or somewhere in Europe would be ideal.

Any help would be appreciated guys, thanks
#2
My first thought would be to try some 0000 steel wool, but that does involve a lot of fibers all over the place, and not something you probably want mucking up an FR. You wouldn't need to use a Dremel with it, might just be something by hand...at least at first.
Guitar/Bass:
Schecter: Damien 6/Stilletto Extreme 5, Squier: Bullet HSS*, Washburn RX10*/WG-587, Agile Septor 727
*mods

Amps/FX
Peavey: Vypyr 30/Max 112 (200W), ISP: Decimator

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#3
Quote by bjgrifter
My first thought would be to try some 0000 steel wool, but that does involve a lot of fibers all over the place, and not something you probably want mucking up an FR. You wouldn't need to use a Dremel with it, might just be something by hand...at least at first.


+1 to the steel wool. don't do it near the pickups though.

also i would not use a dremel either, that would be my last course of action.
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#4
I restrung my Damien and shined up the volume and tone knobs. Dey real shiney now.
Guitar/Bass:
Schecter: Damien 6/Stilletto Extreme 5, Squier: Bullet HSS*, Washburn RX10*/WG-587, Agile Septor 727
*mods

Amps/FX
Peavey: Vypyr 30/Max 112 (200W), ISP: Decimator

Quote by dannyalcatraz
Understood- I waste money on amps*, too.

justinguitar.com is the answer
#5
I would remove it from the guitar, dis-assemble, then use a toothbrush and some cleaning agent. Then polish with a hand polish and re assemble.
"Well reeeer to you too sir...Its the internet. Do you really expect it to be completely serious?" - mcraddict81592
#6
To remove dirt, you can take the trem off the guitar and drop it into one of those sonic jewelry cleaners (appropriate size, of course). Works great. No need to disassemble anything. It is possible to deal with corrosion at a gun shop, where there are buckets of "dip" that can remove it, but that's pretty drastic. After that, a treatment with a light mineral or sewing machine oil is appropriate to keep screw threads, etc., lubricated.