#1
Hey everyone,

I have a cheap Harley Benton bass that I use to record bass tracks for my songs, it still has the factory strings and I use it for Eb/Drop C#, the strings are kind of thin for the tuning, and the low E string has lots of fret buzz. This didn't really bother me until recently, I started using all of the strings while recording to avoid going too high up the neck and having the bass sound boomy and unconsistent as fuck.

Now the problem is that I've realized, that the A string actually has more bass in the recording than the low E, because of the tension/fret buzz, so raising the action on the low E string would solve this to some extent right?

Any advice on setting up the bass is welcome too, I've never set up basses but I have set up some guitars pretty good.

Also, sorry, can't buy new strings.

Thanks
#4
Most manufacturers list stock string gauges on their website.
Guitar/Bass:
Schecter: Damien 6/Stilletto Extreme 5, Squier: Bullet HSS*, Washburn RX10*/WG-587, Agile Septor 727
*mods

Amps/FX
Peavey: Vypyr 30/Max 112 (200W), ISP: Decimator

Quote by dannyalcatraz
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#7
First address the fret buzz, that isn't just about action it's also about neck relief. With the string fretted at the first and last fret there should just be space to slide a thin pick or the edge of a credit card just under the string in the middle. That slight curve in the neck will mean the string just clears the end of the neck as you fret. To get that curve you need to adjust the truss rod which is a simple procedure but google it, there are plenty of demo's on You Tube.

You need new strings probably, so start saving.

Your E string should be bassier than the A string whatever tuning you use. How did you record the bass? Miking the cab isn't simple and you may have to experiment with mic placement to get the deeper notes coming through properly. If the bass was DI'd then how were you picking the strings? Picking near the bridge makes them less bassy, near the neck more bassy
#8
I record everything with DI.

Nahh the reason why the A string has more bass than the E string is because the E string is too loose, keeps hitting the fretboard, loses sustain, etc. I guess the stock strings can handle Eb tuning but when I drop the Eb string 1 step down it becomes to loose. I was asking about the action because I did that trick with a cheap guitar with issues, I only did it for recording though.

Truss rod adjustments I have done before on some guitars and holy shit I used to be scared of doing it, but it's okay if you're careful I guess, I heard that with bases I have to go slower as it takes more time for the wood to settle to the adjustment, I'll have to google it again just to be sure though.

Save up and new strings it is then I guess!
#9
Quote by VStratto Music


Now the problem is that I've realized, that the A string actually has more bass in the recording than the low E, because of the tension/fret buzz, so raising the action on the low E string would solve this to some extent right?



Lessee. You have a really cheap bass with old strings and you've tuned those skinny old strings to near slackness and you've likely got nothing on the output end that would reproduce low bass anyway. And no, raising the action on the low E string wouldn't solve any of this to any extent.
#11
Just be careful when raising the action. if you go too high, your notes will actually go sharp when you fret them.
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