#1
I have messed with the saddle height of my guitar trying to get rid of fret buzz now im not sure how to bring it back into original position help
#2
kharelius
Hi, please, provide information about your guitar model, type of bridge, what exactly you've done and give pictures, that can show the current state of the bridge.
#3
^This.

Usually its as simple as turning whichever screws you adjusted the same number of turns in the opposite direction, but not always.
Rig Winter 2017:

Fender Jazzmaster/Yamaha SG1000
Boss TU-3, DS-2, CS-3, EHX small stone, Danelectro delay
Laney VC30-112 with G12H30 speaker, or Session Rockette 30 for smaller gigs
Elixir Nanoweb 11-49 strings, Dunlop Jazz III XL picks
Shure SM57 mic in front of the amp
#6
kharelius
As I don't quite understand from your photo what exactly you've done I can only recommend watching videos about correct setting string action and setting up bolts screws for best floating performance:

#7
Udjine ive adjusted every single saddle height but now i am not sure if the radius is still good, i need the radius
#8
To answer the questions you've posted in a bunch of other threads:

No, you can't damage a guitar by having the radius set wrong or having the saddles set too high, it just might not be as comfortable for you to play as you might want it to be. J Mascis actually does both of these things on purpose on all of his guitars - I guess he likes his guitars to put up a fight. Seriously, he uses a 12" fixed radius bridge on a guitar with a 7.25" radius and he sets the strings so high you can't help but wonder how he even manages to play them at all.

Which version of the Fender Stratocaster do you have? There are loads of different variations these days with all kinds of different specifications. It's most likely that your guitar has a 9.5" radius unless it's a vintage spec reissue ('50s, '60s etc.) then it'll probably be 7.25". As long as you don't have certain strings that feel noticeably out of alignment with the others you shouldn't have any problem - but if you really want to make sure the radius is perfectly matched, you'll need a radius gauge that matches your guitars fingerboard radius. The cheapest and easiest way to get one is to find a printable one on the internet (just google "printable radius gauge" and you'll surely find them!), print it and cut it to shape with some scissors! It's a little crude, but it works!
Rig Winter 2017:

Fender Jazzmaster/Yamaha SG1000
Boss TU-3, DS-2, CS-3, EHX small stone, Danelectro delay
Laney VC30-112 with G12H30 speaker, or Session Rockette 30 for smaller gigs
Elixir Nanoweb 11-49 strings, Dunlop Jazz III XL picks
Shure SM57 mic in front of the amp