#1
Hi Members,

I'm thinking about purchasing a Pedal board and effects linked together.

Ultimately I want to sound like Killswitch, Underoath, Metallica, Chimaria, AC/DC and The Devil Wears Prada.

Also because I am new to the pedal world some terminology's I don't know what they do and how important they are.

Preamp Processor?
Noise Reduction?
Remote Foot Controller?

If you can explain those for me I would appreciate it a lot. I normally use a an effects processor from ZOOM with built in but I want to explore more and sound close to my favourite bands. Rob Arnold from Chimaria uses an expensive ISP Decimator Noise Reduction which is £150.

Another note because I don't have rob Arnold's AMP or AMP Head would that also effect how I sound similar to him or is it down to the pedals. I am using this as an example so I get a good understanding of the situation.

I appreciate all your help on this matter.

Best regards,
Zeussrapidfire
#6
Your amp is the problem. You'll not get those tones through that amp.

I'm not even sure if that will take pedals well.

You're trying to get professional tones from a beginner amp.

I'm not trying to be a dick or mean, I'm just being honest.
#7
When I started out I didn't know a tremolo from a phaser to a reverb. Got a cheap multi fx unit and learned what I liked and then started getting higher end pedals. Now I use some of those pedals with a better multi fx unit. It probably saved me a lot of money in the long run.
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VHT Special 6
Phonic 620 Power Pod PA
Wampler Super Plextortion
Line 6 Pod HD
#8
Starting with the terminology:
Preamp processor is a generic term that just means "tone shaping device." A preamp is just tone shaping, and the "processor" could mean a few things depending on the context. In most cases "preamp processor" is likely to include tone shaping options (volume, gain, EQ, maybe modeled preamp sounds) and effects (reverb, delay, chorus, etc). Some might have only one or the other, or more focus on one than the other, but again it's a pretty flexible term.
Noise reduction is a pedal or algorithm that removes hiss and hum from your signal. If you play with a lot of distortion, or single coil pickups, you'll notice that when you're not playing there's white noise instead of silence. A noise reduction circuit removes that.
Remote foot controller is exactly what it says. It's a foot controller that's...remote. Usually this is just a little footswitch that lets you click effects or settings on and off. For example, if you want to change the channel on your amp, a "remote foot controller" (more commonly just called a footswitch) is a box that you plug into your amp to turn channels on and off quickly, without using your hands or fiddling with the settings on the amp itself. There are lots of different kinds of these, some of them get pretty sophisticated with digital preset banks for amps or multi-effects processors. Footswitches just send messages telling the amp or preamp what to do. That makes them different from effects pedals, which alter the signal themselves.

It's important to reiterate that pedals and foot controllers are totally different things. A foot controller or footswitch can't make your amp sound any different than it already does. It just makes it easier to change settings or presets or channels. It doesn't plug into the signal. A pedal or preamp is inserted into the signal path and will change the sound.

The amp makes a big difference to how you sound. Pedals can change that to some extent but the amp is basis of what you sound like and is super important. Adding pedals to an amp that isn't right for your needs is usually a waste of money. That's why Grawgos asked what amp you have. Usually you want to upgrade the amp before adding pedals, in a situation like yours.
#9
That's great guys any good pedals you could recommend for my amp or is there nothing?

If I did purchase a better amp which amp would you consider to work with the professional pedals?

Best regards,
Zeussrapidfire

Preferably 30watt maximum if choosing a better amp
Last edited by zeussrapidfire at Feb 4, 2017,
#11
Gonna have to decide what your budgets going to be. classic 30, delta blues, blues Jr all take pedals pretty well, but there are literally dozens and dozens that will. You need to decide if you want head\cab or combo. How loud do you want to get etc.
Dean Icon PZ
Line 6 Variax 700
Dean V-Wing
Dean ML 79 SilverBurst
MXR M 108
H2O Chorus/Echo
Valve Junior (V3 Head/Cab and Combo)
VHT Special 6
Phonic 620 Power Pod PA
Wampler Super Plextortion
Line 6 Pod HD
#12
Definitely get an amp and don't even think about pedals until you've done that. I did the same when i was starting out and wasted like $300 on pedals which sounded awful with my beginner amp and i ended up selling them later on. What guitar are you using out of curiosity and as said above what is your budget for an amp?
Last edited by vayne92 at Feb 5, 2017,
#13
Quote by zeussrapidfire
That's great guys any good pedals you could recommend for my amp or is there nothing?

If I did purchase a better amp which amp would you consider to work with the professional pedals?

Best regards,
Zeussrapidfire

Preferably 30watt maximum if choosing a better amp

30 watts is a strange parameter, especially if it's the only one you mention. Something like the 6505 112 might be perfect for you, there's not much point in artificially constricting yourself. A 50 watt amp still has a volume knob, and isn't going to be noticeably louder than a 30 watt. It'll just have a tad more headroom.

As mentioned above, a budget will help us narrow down some suggestions for you. If you're not ready for a new amp, it's not the end of the world to pick up a pedal or two, and they probably will sound a little better than just the amp alone, but I'd suggest improving the amp situation first, you'll get a lot more out of that upgrade. Plus, unless your musical style relies heavily on effects, a great amp and no pedals is usually a lot more rewarding than a bunch of effects and an amp that doesn't quite cut it.

In fact, depending on which Zoom unit you have, you might be totally set for effects. Some of the newer Zoom modelers are quite good.
#14
What Zoom effects pedal do you have?
So long as its from the later ranges, you already have a great pedal with more than enough effects and amp sims to figure out what you need.
Experiment with it. Make a note of what amp sims you like, then add your favourite amp to your shopping list. Do the same with pedals.
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