#1
Ive been playing for 4 years, and have developed many skills, but when i play Rocksmith i tottally suck, i lose all motivation, do i suck at guitar?
#4
Like no way this isn't complete troll bait.

On the off-chance that it isn't, no, sucking at rocksmith doesn't mean you suck at guitar.
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#5
Rocksmith is just a game and should be treated as such. Don't treat it as a serious practicing/teaching tool because it just isn't one.
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Just remember that there are no boring scales, just boring players.

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#6
I remember an interview with either Dragonforce or Shadows Fall or some such from a few years ago. One of the guitarists spoke up about how he couldn't win on one of those guitar video games, even playing his own band's songs,

So, no- there's no hard correlation between your skill and talent as a guitarist and your ability to play a guitar-themed video game.
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Log off and play yer guitar!

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#7
Rocksmith or Rocksmith 2014?

The original Rocksmith (2010 I think) is fun but the tracking isn't as good as in Rocksmith 2014.
The lessons (basic as they are) definitely help get the feel of the game and the minigames help with learning the game as well.
It could also be an issue with your settings as you're playing the game because sometimes there can be audio latency depending on your setup.
As someone who really digs in when I play, sometimes the notes don't register properly even if I played them correctly because I'm hitting the string just a bit too hard or something, but it's a rarer problem as I've adjusted my picking a bit to compensate. It isn't a bad thing, as now I find I can play faster and cleaner IRL where my heavy handedness was holding me back.

Quote by MaggaraMarine
Rocksmith is just a game and should be treated as such. Don't treat it as a serious practicing/teaching tool because it just isn't one.
+1
#8
The problem I see with Rocksmith is that it only cares about playing the right notes when the game tells you to play them. And you need to play everything exactly like the game tells, otherwise it's a mistake. (And while I think learning to play stuff like it's on the record is a good thing, I don't think Rocksmith teaches it the right way - you can't figure out the exact phrasing by just following what the game tells you. You need to use your ears for that.) If you get 95% of the notes correct, that may seem like a good performance, but it may actually sound like complete crap (I have seen plenty of Youtube videos of Rocksmith guitar covers and most of them just don't sound good). Playing the right notes is not everything there is to music, and playing the right notes is really all Rocksmith teaches (and it doesn't necessarily even teach it well, because when people see "95% correct", they will most likely ignore the incorrect 5% of notes and be like "who cares, I got the vast majority of the notes correct, so good enough").

Rocksmith teaches you to play guitar as much as SingStar teaches you to sing. Both are fun games, but that's pretty much it. Sure, you can make progress by playing Rocksmith a lot, but I would not suggest using it for that. Playing Rocksmith has nothing to do with practicing.

This video pretty much sums up my thoughts about Rocksmith:

Quote by AlanHB
Just remember that there are no boring scales, just boring players.

Gear

Bach Stradivarius 37G
Charvel So Cal
Fender Dimension Bass
Hartke HyDrive 210c
Ibanez BL70
Laney VC30
Tokai TB48
Yamaha FG720S-12
Yamaha P115
Last edited by MaggaraMarine at Feb 6, 2017,
#9
The way Rocksmith presents stuff and scores you is, for the most part, counter-intuitive to actually playing the guitar so I'm not surprised you're struggling with it.If you can actually play then trying to react to visual clues is incredibly difficult, and when you think about it is not even a skill you need to develop.
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#10
There is video on YouTube where Gene Simmons is at some game store trying to play "Rock and Roll All Night" on Guitar Hero and he can't do it. Funny, and Eric Singer is with him and can't play the little electronic drum set on the song either. Since Gene wrote and played the song originally I don't think not being able to play it on a game whether it is Guitar Hero or Rocksmith means anything in reference to a real instrument.
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#11
Quote by MaggaraMarine
The problem I see with Rocksmith is that it only cares about playing the right notes when the game tells you to play them. And you need to play everything exactly like the game tells, otherwise it's a mistake. (And while I think learning to play stuff like it's on the record is a good thing, I don't think Rocksmith teaches it the right way - you can't figure out the exact phrasing by just following what the game tells you. You need to use your ears for that.) If you get 95% of the notes correct, that may seem like a good performance, but it may actually sound like complete crap (I have seen plenty of Youtube videos of Rocksmith guitar covers and most of them just don't sound good). Playing the right notes is not everything there is to music, and playing the right notes is really all Rocksmith teaches (and it doesn't necessarily even teach it well, because when people see "95% correct", they will most likely ignore the incorrect 5% of notes and be like "who cares, I got the vast majority of the notes correct, so good enough").

Rocksmith teaches you to play guitar as much as SingStar teaches you to sing. Both are fun games, but that's pretty much it. Sure, you can make progress by playing Rocksmith a lot, but I would not suggest using it for that. Playing Rocksmith has nothing to do with practicing.

This video pretty much sums up my thoughts about Rocksmith:



Just watching that guy butcher and sort of vibrato. The thing with Rocksmith is that it doesn't teach accuracy, but with a software. Majority of these Rocksmith Guitar Covers that I see on YouTube are by players that can hardly play decently, regardless. It's essentially Guitar Hero with an actual guitar for a controller.
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